Summer Reading Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lauren Owen: IMG The Other Vampire



It's a wild and thundery night. Inside a ramshackle old manor house, a beautiful young girl lies asleep in bed. At the window, a figure watches... Continue »

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$9.95
List price: $18.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
2 Hawthorne Military- Nautical

Six Frigates: The Epic History of the Founding of the U.S. Navy

by

Six Frigates: The Epic History of the Founding of the U.S. Navy Cover

 

Staff Pick

The birth of the U.S. Navy and its coming-of-age engagements are the subject of this richly told and intriguing history. More than a maritime account, this action-filled read skillfully relates the struggles of our country in its infancy.
Recommended by Chandler, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

How a handful of bastards and outlaws fighting under a piece of striped bunting humbled the omnipotent British Navy.

Before the ink was dry on the U.S. Constitution, the establishment of a permanent military had become the most divisive issue facing the new government. Would a standing army be the thin end of dictatorship? Would a navy protect American commerce against the Mediterranean pirates, or drain the treasury and provoke hostilities with the great powers? The founders — particularly Jefferson, Madison, and Adams — debated these questions fiercely and switched sides more than once. How much of a navy would suffice? Britain alone had hundreds of powerful warships.

From the decision to build six heavy frigates, through the cliffhanger campaign against Tripoli, to the war that shook the world in 1812, Ian W. Toll tells this grand tale with the political insight of Founding Brothers and a narrative flair worthy of Patrick O'Brian. According to Henry Adams, the 1812 encounter between USS Constitution and HMS Guerriere raised the United States in one half hour to the rank of a first class power in the world.

Review:

"[A] fluent, intelligent history of American military policy from the early 1790s....But the book's real value...lies in Toll's grasp of the human dimension of his subject, often obscured in the dry tomes of naval historians." New York Times

Review:

"Toll details the process of designing, building, launching, manning and sailing these wooden-hulled ships....He gives life to such figures as commanders Stephen Decatur, Isaac Hull and ship designer Joshua Humphreys." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Sweeping in scope, full of vivid descriptions of naval battles...a masterly work." Houston Chronicle

Review:

"[W]ell-paced and smart. [Toll's] use of accurate and interesting nautical lexicon is particularly effective, and adds a nice hint of salty air to the dialogue." San Diego Union-Tribune

Review:

"[A] masterful, well-written and easily read addition to the history of the important early years of U.S. naval history." Philadelphia Inquirer

Synopsis:

"A fluent, intelligent history...give[s] the reader a feel for the human quirks and harsh demands of life at sea."--New York Times Book Review

Synopsis:

Before the ink was dry on the U.S. Constitution, the establishment of a permanent military became the most divisive issue facing the new government. The founders'"particularly Jefferson, Madison, and Adams'"debated fiercely. Would a standing army be the thin end of dictatorship? Would a navy protect from pirates or drain the treasury and provoke hostility? Britain alone had hundreds of powerful warships.

From the decision to build six heavy frigates, through the cliff-hanger campaign against Tripoli, to the war that shook the world in 1812, Ian W. Toll tells this grand tale with the political insight of Founding Brothersand the narrative flair of Patrick O'Brian.

Synopsis:

Before the ink was dry on the U.S. Constitution, the establishment of a permanent military became the most divisive issue facing the new government. The founders--particularly Jefferson, Madison, and Adams--debated fiercely. Would a standing army be the thin end of dictatorship? Would a navy protect from pirates or drain the treasury and provoke hostility? Britain alone had hundreds of powerful warships.

From the decision to build six heavy frigates, through the cliff-hanger campaign against Tripoli, to the war that shook the world in 1812, Ian W. Toll tells this grand tale with the political insight of Founding Brothers and the narrative flair of Patrick O'Brian.

About the Author

Ian W. Toll has been a Wall Street analyst, a Federal Reserve financial analyst, and a political aide and speechwriter. Six Frigates is his first book. He lives in San Francisco, California.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393330328
Author:
Toll, Ian W.
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Military - Naval
Subject:
Military - United States
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
United States History War of 1812.
Subject:
United States History, Naval 19th century.
Subject:
Military-Naval History
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20080331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
592
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Sea of Thunder: Four Commanders and... Used Trade Paper $4.95
  2. Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought... Used Trade Paper $9.95
  3. Seize the Fire: Heroism, Duty, and... Used Trade Paper $4.95
  4. Heroes of the Valley (Heroes of the...
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  5. From the Mixed Up Files of MRS Basil... Used Mass Market $2.50

Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Military » Nautical
History and Social Science » Military » Naval History
History and Social Science » Military » US Military » General
History and Social Science » US History » 1800 to 1945
History and Social Science » World History » General

Six Frigates: The Epic History of the Founding of the U.S. Navy Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 592 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393330328 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

The birth of the U.S. Navy and its coming-of-age engagements are the subject of this richly told and intriguing history. More than a maritime account, this action-filled read skillfully relates the struggles of our country in its infancy.

"Review" by , "[A] fluent, intelligent history of American military policy from the early 1790s....But the book's real value...lies in Toll's grasp of the human dimension of his subject, often obscured in the dry tomes of naval historians."
"Review" by , "Toll details the process of designing, building, launching, manning and sailing these wooden-hulled ships....He gives life to such figures as commanders Stephen Decatur, Isaac Hull and ship designer Joshua Humphreys."
"Review" by , "Sweeping in scope, full of vivid descriptions of naval battles...a masterly work."
"Review" by , "[W]ell-paced and smart. [Toll's] use of accurate and interesting nautical lexicon is particularly effective, and adds a nice hint of salty air to the dialogue."
"Review" by , "[A] masterful, well-written and easily read addition to the history of the important early years of U.S. naval history."
"Synopsis" by , "A fluent, intelligent history...give[s] the reader a feel for the human quirks and harsh demands of life at sea."--New York Times Book Review
"Synopsis" by , Before the ink was dry on the U.S. Constitution, the establishment of a permanent military became the most divisive issue facing the new government. The founders'"particularly Jefferson, Madison, and Adams'"debated fiercely. Would a standing army be the thin end of dictatorship? Would a navy protect from pirates or drain the treasury and provoke hostility? Britain alone had hundreds of powerful warships.

From the decision to build six heavy frigates, through the cliff-hanger campaign against Tripoli, to the war that shook the world in 1812, Ian W. Toll tells this grand tale with the political insight of Founding Brothersand the narrative flair of Patrick O'Brian.

"Synopsis" by , Before the ink was dry on the U.S. Constitution, the establishment of a permanent military became the most divisive issue facing the new government. The founders--particularly Jefferson, Madison, and Adams--debated fiercely. Would a standing army be the thin end of dictatorship? Would a navy protect from pirates or drain the treasury and provoke hostility? Britain alone had hundreds of powerful warships.

From the decision to build six heavy frigates, through the cliff-hanger campaign against Tripoli, to the war that shook the world in 1812, Ian W. Toll tells this grand tale with the political insight of Founding Brothers and the narrative flair of Patrick O'Brian.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.