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Q&A | February 27, 2014

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Describe your latest book. The Enchanted is a story narrated by a man on death row. The novel was inspired by my work as a death penalty... Continue »
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    The Enchanted

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1 Beaverton Children's Young Adult- General

Green Angel

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Green Angel Cover

ISBN13: 9780439443852
ISBN10: 0439443857
Condition: Worn Condition or Underlined
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The startling, universally acclaimed breakthrough YA novel from master bestselling author Alice Hoffman, now in paperback.

Left on her own when her family dies in a terrible disaster, fifteen-year-old Green is haunted by loss and by the past. Struggling to survive physically and emotionally in a place where nothing seems to grow and ashes are everywhere, Green retreats into the ruined realm of her garden. But in destroying her feelings, she also begins to destroy herself, erasing the girl she'd once been as she inks darkness into her skin. It is only through a series of mysterious encounters that Green can relearn the lessons of love and begin to heal enough to tell her story.

Review:

"In lean, hypnotic prose, Hoffman (Indigo) constructs a post-apocalyptic fairy tale leavened with hope. 'I was a moody, dark weed,' confides Green, a shy 15-year-old with a talent for gardening who narrates the novel. Angry at being left behind one day when her parents and younger sister go to the city to sell the family's produce, Green has 'too much pride to say good-bye.' She comes to regret her decision when a cataclysmic fire destroys the city — and her family. In an all-too-frighteningly familiar scene, Hoffman describes bystanders who 'could see people jumping from the buildings, like silver birds, like bright diamonds.' Green walls herself off from emotion. She renames herself Ash, crafts a sort of armor from her father's old leather jacket and nail-studded boots, sews thorns onto her clothes and tattoos her body. 'Blood and ink. Darkness where before there had been patience, black where there'd once been green.' But she begins to heal all the same: she leaves food for a desperate classmate for whom she had once felt only envy, and takes in a stray dog, a wounded hawk and a mysterious boy her age who keeps his face covered and does not speak. The author builds the narrative like a poem, meticulously choosing metaphors that reverberate throughout the novel. The 'diamonds,' the lives lost, become reborn in the person of the mute boy whom Green calls Diamond; sparrows knit Green a fishing net from her own hair, with which to catch supper when her food runs out. The birth of spring coincides with the rebuilding of the city — and Green's reawakening ('I could feel something green growing inside me. Green as summer in my bones'). In lesser hands, the layers of dense, lush description-apple trees 'as fruitless as fence posts'; 'mourning doves the color of tears' — might have overwhelmed the dreamy, first-person narrative. But Hoffman creates a careful balance, crafting an achingly lovely backdrop to the transfiguration of a compelling character whose very self becomes a metaphor for renewal. Ages 12-up. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

rabid reader, July 9, 2009 (view all comments by rabid reader)
Even though this book came out a year ago (or more) I only just read it, because I picked it up from a giveaway box.

I loved this book. The writing is very much like the writing of a fairytale, very lyrical and descriptive. The writing makes you feel for the girl, feel her loss and despair. When she begins to come out of her state, you feel lighter, right along with her.

I especially liked how this young girl's grieving matched the passing of the seasons. Nice touch. The way this young woman deals with her grief reminds me of some teenaged girls that I've known.

I would recommend this to others.
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(0 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
michiru215, April 8, 2008 (view all comments by michiru215)
Its good trust me I own it.
I'd write a whole two paragraphs
like everybody else but it got deleted sorry.
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(3 of 4 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780439443852
Author:
Hoffman, Alice
Publisher:
Scholastic Paperbacks
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - General
Subject:
Nature & the Natural World - Gardening
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Gardening
Subject:
Grief
Subject:
Children s-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass Market Paperbound
Publication Date:
20040501
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
128
Dimensions:
6.75 x 4.13 in
Age Level:
12-17

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Related Subjects


Children's » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Death and Dying
Young Adult » General

Green Angel Used Mass Market
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$1.50 In Stock
Product details 128 pages Scholastic Paperbacks - English 9780439443852 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In lean, hypnotic prose, Hoffman (Indigo) constructs a post-apocalyptic fairy tale leavened with hope. 'I was a moody, dark weed,' confides Green, a shy 15-year-old with a talent for gardening who narrates the novel. Angry at being left behind one day when her parents and younger sister go to the city to sell the family's produce, Green has 'too much pride to say good-bye.' She comes to regret her decision when a cataclysmic fire destroys the city — and her family. In an all-too-frighteningly familiar scene, Hoffman describes bystanders who 'could see people jumping from the buildings, like silver birds, like bright diamonds.' Green walls herself off from emotion. She renames herself Ash, crafts a sort of armor from her father's old leather jacket and nail-studded boots, sews thorns onto her clothes and tattoos her body. 'Blood and ink. Darkness where before there had been patience, black where there'd once been green.' But she begins to heal all the same: she leaves food for a desperate classmate for whom she had once felt only envy, and takes in a stray dog, a wounded hawk and a mysterious boy her age who keeps his face covered and does not speak. The author builds the narrative like a poem, meticulously choosing metaphors that reverberate throughout the novel. The 'diamonds,' the lives lost, become reborn in the person of the mute boy whom Green calls Diamond; sparrows knit Green a fishing net from her own hair, with which to catch supper when her food runs out. The birth of spring coincides with the rebuilding of the city — and Green's reawakening ('I could feel something green growing inside me. Green as summer in my bones'). In lesser hands, the layers of dense, lush description-apple trees 'as fruitless as fence posts'; 'mourning doves the color of tears' — might have overwhelmed the dreamy, first-person narrative. But Hoffman creates a careful balance, crafting an achingly lovely backdrop to the transfiguration of a compelling character whose very self becomes a metaphor for renewal. Ages 12-up. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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