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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

Boomsday

by

Boomsday Cover

ISBN13: 9780446697972
ISBN10: 0446697974
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $1.95!

 

Staff Pick

If your introduction to Christopher Buckley was the hilarious film of his novel Thank You for Smoking, you owe it to yourself to read Buckley's latest book and see how excruciatingly funny he is on the page. Like so many of his works, Boomsday chases each laugh with a small shudder, causing the reader to wonder if this actually could happen someday. Read it while it's still fiction!
Recommended by Hank, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Boomsday's heroine is Cassandra Devine, a charismatic 29-year-old blogger who incites massive political turmoil when, outraged over mounting Social Security debt, she politely suggests that Baby Boomers be given government incentives to kill themselves by age 75. Her modest proposal catches fire with millions of her outraged peers (Generation Whatever) and an ambitious Senator seeking to gain the youth vote in his presidential campaign.

With the help of Washington's greatest spin doctor, the blogger and the politician try to ride the issue of euthanasia for Boomers (they call it Transitioning) all the way to the White House, over the forceful objections of the Religious Right and, of course, Baby Boomers, who are deeply offended by demonstrations on the golf courses of their retirement resorts.

Review:

"[Signature] Reviewed by Jessica Cutler It's the end of the world as we know it, especially if bloggers are setting the national agenda. In his latest novel, Buckley imagines a not-so-distant future when America teeters on the brink of economic disaster as the baby boomers start retiring. Buckley takes on such pressing (however boring) topics as Social Security reform and fiscal solvency, as does his protagonist. And get this: she's a blogger.Buckley's heroine is 'a morally superior twenty-nine-year-old PR chick' who blogs at night about the impending Boomsday budget crisis. Of course, 'she was young, she was pretty, she was blonde, she had something to say.' She has a large, doting audience that eagerly awaits her every blog entry. And her name? Cassandra. And the name of her blog? Also Cassandra. Of course, Buckley doesn't let his allusion get by us:'She was a goddess of something,' another character struggles to remember, which gives his heroine the opportunity to educate us about the significance of her namesake.'Daughter of the king of Troy. She warned that the city would fall to the Greeks,' she explains. 'Cassandra is sort of a metaphor for catastrophe prediction. This is me. It's what I do.' So Cassandra, doing what she does, starts by calling for 'an economic Bastille Day' and her minions take to destroying golf courses in protest. Cassandra grabs headlines and magazine covers, and the president starts wringing his hands over what she might blog about next. Her follow-up: a radical but tantalizingly expedient solution to that most vexing of issues, the Social Security problem — Cassandra proposes that senior citizens kill themselves in exchange for tax breaks. Buckley, author of Thank You for Smoking, shows great imagination as he fires his pistol at the feet of his straw women and men. In 300-plus pages, though, it would be nice if he had found a way to endear us to at least one of his characters. Yes, we know that Washington is 'an asshole-rich environment,' as one puts it, but some Tom Wolfe-style self-loathing might be good for characters who use the word touch. Full disclosure: I'm a blogger of Cassandra's generation, and at times the totally over-the-top, relentlessly us-against-them scenario reminded me that I was reading a book written by someone not of the blogging generation, someone who Cassandra would want put down. Oh, the irony in these generationalist feelings. Then again, maybe that's exactly Buckley's point. (Jessica Cutler is the author of The Washingtonienne.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Does government-sanctioned suicide offer the same potential for satire as, say, the consumption of children? Possibly. One need only look to Kurt Vonnegut's story 'Welcome to the Monkey House,' with its 'Federal Ethical Suicide Parlors' staffed by Juno-esque hostesses in purple body stockings. Or the recent film 'Children of Men,' in which television commercials for a suicide drug mimic, to an unsettling... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"[O]ne of Mr. Buckley's fizziest satires." Janet Maslin, New York Times

Review:

"A farcical romp, the novel offers a fresh take on everything from presidential politics to political correctness to religious pomposity. Add to this Buckley's bright writing, his right-on metaphors...and you'll have maybe not an answer to fiscal and religious foibles but, at the very least, a good laugh at their expense." Baltimore Sun

Review:

"It would be more fun (and more interesting) to read Buckley if he were meaner and more profound. But if you're looking for a lighter, frothier version of Tom Wolfe...Boomsday is your ticket." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"The ideal review of a Buckley novel would consist simply of a string of his witty, biting, insightful comments and dialogue." Chicago Sun-Times

Review:

"Character development and plot are not Buckley's strong suits, although there is no requirement for them in a book like this....But these are quibbles, not serious flaws. Buckley is so right on with his satire that his (venial) sins can be forgiven." Providence Journal

Synopsis:

A charismatic 29-year-old blogger incites massive political turmoil when she politely suggests that Baby Boomers be given government incentives to kill themselves by age 75. Her modest proposal catches fire with millions of her outraged peers and an ambitious Senator.

Synopsis:

One of America's most hilarious novelists and bestselling author of Thank You for Smoking takes on the plight of aging Baby Boomers in this Swiftian comedy about generational warfare.

About the Author

Christopher Buckley is the author of several books, many of them national bestsellers, including Thank You for Smoking, The White House Mess, God Is My Broker, Little Green Men, and No Way to Treat a First Lady, which won the Thurber Prize for American Humor. He has published more than fifty comic essays in the New Yorker. In 2002, he received the Washington Irving Medal for Literary Excellence. He is the editor of ForbesLife and lives in New York and Washington, D.C.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

cmcurrie2, January 28, 2012 (view all comments by cmcurrie2)
Political satire at its finest, and a wry observation of the American idiot.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780446697972
Author:
Buckley, Christopher
Publisher:
Twelve
Subject:
Political
Subject:
Baby boom generation
Subject:
Humorous fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
General Fiction
Copyright:
Publication Date:
May 2008
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.01x5.36x.93 in. .71 lbs.

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » American Studies » Popular Culture

Boomsday Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$1.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Twelve - English 9780446697972 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

If your introduction to Christopher Buckley was the hilarious film of his novel Thank You for Smoking, you owe it to yourself to read Buckley's latest book and see how excruciatingly funny he is on the page. Like so many of his works, Boomsday chases each laugh with a small shudder, causing the reader to wonder if this actually could happen someday. Read it while it's still fiction!

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "[Signature] Reviewed by Jessica Cutler It's the end of the world as we know it, especially if bloggers are setting the national agenda. In his latest novel, Buckley imagines a not-so-distant future when America teeters on the brink of economic disaster as the baby boomers start retiring. Buckley takes on such pressing (however boring) topics as Social Security reform and fiscal solvency, as does his protagonist. And get this: she's a blogger.Buckley's heroine is 'a morally superior twenty-nine-year-old PR chick' who blogs at night about the impending Boomsday budget crisis. Of course, 'she was young, she was pretty, she was blonde, she had something to say.' She has a large, doting audience that eagerly awaits her every blog entry. And her name? Cassandra. And the name of her blog? Also Cassandra. Of course, Buckley doesn't let his allusion get by us:'She was a goddess of something,' another character struggles to remember, which gives his heroine the opportunity to educate us about the significance of her namesake.'Daughter of the king of Troy. She warned that the city would fall to the Greeks,' she explains. 'Cassandra is sort of a metaphor for catastrophe prediction. This is me. It's what I do.' So Cassandra, doing what she does, starts by calling for 'an economic Bastille Day' and her minions take to destroying golf courses in protest. Cassandra grabs headlines and magazine covers, and the president starts wringing his hands over what she might blog about next. Her follow-up: a radical but tantalizingly expedient solution to that most vexing of issues, the Social Security problem — Cassandra proposes that senior citizens kill themselves in exchange for tax breaks. Buckley, author of Thank You for Smoking, shows great imagination as he fires his pistol at the feet of his straw women and men. In 300-plus pages, though, it would be nice if he had found a way to endear us to at least one of his characters. Yes, we know that Washington is 'an asshole-rich environment,' as one puts it, but some Tom Wolfe-style self-loathing might be good for characters who use the word touch. Full disclosure: I'm a blogger of Cassandra's generation, and at times the totally over-the-top, relentlessly us-against-them scenario reminded me that I was reading a book written by someone not of the blogging generation, someone who Cassandra would want put down. Oh, the irony in these generationalist feelings. Then again, maybe that's exactly Buckley's point. (Jessica Cutler is the author of The Washingtonienne.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[O]ne of Mr. Buckley's fizziest satires."
"Review" by , "A farcical romp, the novel offers a fresh take on everything from presidential politics to political correctness to religious pomposity. Add to this Buckley's bright writing, his right-on metaphors...and you'll have maybe not an answer to fiscal and religious foibles but, at the very least, a good laugh at their expense."
"Review" by , "It would be more fun (and more interesting) to read Buckley if he were meaner and more profound. But if you're looking for a lighter, frothier version of Tom Wolfe...Boomsday is your ticket."
"Review" by , "The ideal review of a Buckley novel would consist simply of a string of his witty, biting, insightful comments and dialogue."
"Review" by , "Character development and plot are not Buckley's strong suits, although there is no requirement for them in a book like this....But these are quibbles, not serious flaws. Buckley is so right on with his satire that his (venial) sins can be forgiven."
"Synopsis" by , A charismatic 29-year-old blogger incites massive political turmoil when she politely suggests that Baby Boomers be given government incentives to kill themselves by age 75. Her modest proposal catches fire with millions of her outraged peers and an ambitious Senator.
"Synopsis" by , One of America's most hilarious novelists and bestselling author of Thank You for Smoking takes on the plight of aging Baby Boomers in this Swiftian comedy about generational warfare.
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