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1 Burnside Children's- Native American Stories

The Sun's Daughter

by

The Sun's Daughter Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Once there was a time when the people of the earth did not have to tend the fields, for the Suns daughters—Maize, Pumpkin, and Red Bean—walked among them, leaving lush crops wherever they stepped. But then headstrong Maize disobeyed her mother and was trapped by cold, lonely Silver, and the Sun vowed not to touch the earth again until Maize was returned.

How the tiny pewee bird saved Maize and kept the people from starving is eloquently told in this tale, which, though based on an Iroquois legend, parallels the Greek myth of Persephone and Demeter. The lovely, unusual images in the text are dramatically complemented by R. Gregory Christies masterful paintings. Afterword.

Review:

"First-timer Sherman tells a Native-American — style myth that explains the origins of winter and summer. She keeps the tale's diction authentic, even majestic: 'Once upon a time, the people of the earth did not have to dig or plant or hoe or reap, for the Sun had sent her own daughter Maize to walk among them.' In Christie's (The Palm of My Heart) full-bleed spreads, stark horizons dwarf the human figures, whose deeply-lined faces resemble ghost masks. Spontaneous-looking brushstrokes in green and yellow stand for corn stalks, and a comb dragged across the paint marks rows in a field. With a nod to Persephone and Demeter, Sherman says that Maize disobeyed Sun, wandered too far and was lured by the subterranean spirit Silver: 'Please... I saw your golden light,' he says. 'Please, I am so lonely in my home underground.' He says he will not free Maize 'until the trees weep.' Meanwhile, Sun says she will not touch the earth again until Maize returns, leaving the humans hungry and cold. Small, brave gray pewees help to find Maize. They fly among the trees, crying, 'Please weep. Please weep.' Sun relents a bit, sap flows — the trees 'weep' — and Silver must keep his promise to let Maize free for half a year. Maize's tale will sow the seeds for discussions about myths and the role they play. Ages 5-8." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Once there was a time when the people of the earth did not have to tend the fields, for the Sun's daughters—Maize, Pumpkin, and Red Bean—walked among them, leaving lush crops wherever they stepped. But then headstrong Maize disobeyed her mother and was trapped by cold, lonely Silver, and the Sun vowed not to touch the earth again until Maize was returned.

How the tiny pewee bird saved Maize and kept the people from starving is eloquently told in this tale, which, though based on an Iroquois legend, parallels the Greek myth of Persephone and Demeter. The lovely, unusual images in the text are dramatically complemented by R. Gregory Christie's masterful paintings. Afterword.

About the Author

Pat Sherman lives in Cambridge, MA. The Sun's Daughter is her first book.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780618324309
Author:
Christie, R. Gregory
Publisher:
Clarion Books
Illustrator:
Christie, R. Gregory
Author:
Christie, R. Gregory
Location:
New York
Subject:
Children's 4-8 - Picturebooks
Subject:
Legends, Myths, & Fables - Other
Subject:
Fairy Tales & Folklore - Single Title
Subject:
Fairy Tales & Folklore - Native American
Subject:
Tales
Subject:
Iroquois indians
Subject:
Tales -- New York (State)
Subject:
Children s Folk Tales-North American
Subject:
Children s-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback - picture book
Publication Date:
March 2005
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from K up to 3
Language:
English
Illustrations:
, Y
Pages:
32
Dimensions:
11 x 9 x 0.13 in 1 lb
Children's Book Type:
Picture / Wordless
Age Level:
05-09

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Native American » Stories
Children's » Picture Books » General

The Sun's Daughter Used Hardcover
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$10.95 In Stock
Product details 32 pages Clarion Books - English 9780618324309 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "First-timer Sherman tells a Native-American — style myth that explains the origins of winter and summer. She keeps the tale's diction authentic, even majestic: 'Once upon a time, the people of the earth did not have to dig or plant or hoe or reap, for the Sun had sent her own daughter Maize to walk among them.' In Christie's (The Palm of My Heart) full-bleed spreads, stark horizons dwarf the human figures, whose deeply-lined faces resemble ghost masks. Spontaneous-looking brushstrokes in green and yellow stand for corn stalks, and a comb dragged across the paint marks rows in a field. With a nod to Persephone and Demeter, Sherman says that Maize disobeyed Sun, wandered too far and was lured by the subterranean spirit Silver: 'Please... I saw your golden light,' he says. 'Please, I am so lonely in my home underground.' He says he will not free Maize 'until the trees weep.' Meanwhile, Sun says she will not touch the earth again until Maize returns, leaving the humans hungry and cold. Small, brave gray pewees help to find Maize. They fly among the trees, crying, 'Please weep. Please weep.' Sun relents a bit, sap flows — the trees 'weep' — and Silver must keep his promise to let Maize free for half a year. Maize's tale will sow the seeds for discussions about myths and the role they play. Ages 5-8." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Once there was a time when the people of the earth did not have to tend the fields, for the Sun's daughters—Maize, Pumpkin, and Red Bean—walked among them, leaving lush crops wherever they stepped. But then headstrong Maize disobeyed her mother and was trapped by cold, lonely Silver, and the Sun vowed not to touch the earth again until Maize was returned.

How the tiny pewee bird saved Maize and kept the people from starving is eloquently told in this tale, which, though based on an Iroquois legend, parallels the Greek myth of Persephone and Demeter. The lovely, unusual images in the text are dramatically complemented by R. Gregory Christie's masterful paintings. Afterword.

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