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They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group

by

They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Fort Breendonk was built in the early 1900s to protect Antwerp, Belgium, from possible German invasion.and#160;Damaged at the start ofand#160;World War I, it fell into disrepair . . . until the Nazis took it over after their invasion of Belgium in 1940, calling it a andldquo;receptionandrdquo; camp for prisoners in transit from one camp to another. It soon became one of most brutal and smallest concentration camps in World War II.and#160;About 3,500 prisoners were held thereandndash;only about half of them survived. As one prisoner put it, andldquo;I would prefer to spend nineteen months at Buchenwald than nineteen days at Breendonk.andrdquo; and#160; and#160; and#160; and#160;and#160;
and#160; and#160; and#160;With access to the camp and its archives and with rare photos and artwork, James M Deem pieces together the story of the camp by telling the stories of its victimsandmdash;Jews, communists, resistance fighters, and even common criminalsandmdash;for the first time in an English language publication. and#160;

Review:

"In this comprehensive, accessible account, Newbery Honor author Bartoletti (Hitler Youth) draws from documentary histories, slave narratives, newspapers, congressional testimony, and other sources to chronicle the origins and proliferation of the Ku Klux Klan against the charged backdrop of Reconstruction politics and legislation. Bartoletti uses the letters and diaries of the founders of the KKK--six former Confederate officers--as well as some informed speculation to explain their incentive for starting a 'club' to, in the words of an original member, 'protect property and preserve law and order.' The author lives up to her introductory promise to avoid censoring racist language and images, and includes some horrifying descriptions of lynchings and murders perpetuated during KKK raids on freedmen's homes, churches, and schools. Copious photos, engravings, and illustrations provide a hard-hitting graphic component to this illuminating book. And while Bartoletti notes that contemporary 'hate groups wield none of the power or prestige that the Ku Klux Klan held in earlier years,' her account of attending a Klan meeting while researching the book is chilling to the core. Ages 12 — up. (Aug.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

Illustrated with archival photographs and drawings, this account reveals how this crushing evil was allowed to thrive.

Synopsis:

This absorbing and captivating nonfiction account (with never-before-published photographs) offers readers an in-depth anthropological and historical look into theand#160;lives of those who suffered and survived Breendonk concentration camp during the Holocaust of World Warand#160;II.and#160;

Synopsis:

In this clear and authoritative account, Russell Freedman illuminates for young readers the complex and rarely discussed subject of World War I, showing the ways in which the seeds of a second world war were sown in the first.

Synopsis:

Nonfiction master Russell Freedman illuminates for young readers the complex and rarely discussed subject of World War I. The tangled relationships and alliances of many nations, the introduction of modern weaponry, and top-level military decisions that resulted in thousands upon thousands of casualties all contributed to the "great war," which people hoped and believed would be the only conflict of its kind. In this clear and authoritative account, the Newbery Medal-winning author shows the ways in which the seeds of a second world war were sown in the first. Numerous archival photographs give the often disturbing subject matter a moving visual counterpart. Includes source notes, a bibliography, and an index.

Synopsis:

Boys, let us get up a club. With those words, six restless young men raided the linens at a friendand#8217;s mansion, pulled pillowcases over their heads, hopped on horses, and cavorted through the streets of Pulaski, Tennessee in 1866. The six friends named their club the Ku Klux Klan, and, all too quickly, their club grew into the self-proclaimed Invisible Empire with secret dens spread across the South. This is the story of how a secret terrorist group took root in Americaand#8217;s democracy. Filled with chilling and vivid personal accounts unearthed from oral histories, congressional documents, and diaries, this account from Newbery Honor-winning author Susan Campbell Bartoletti is a book to read and remember. A YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist.

About the Author

Susan Campbell Bartoletti is the award-winning author of several books for young readers, including Black Potatoes: The Story of the Great Irish Famine, 1845-1850, winner of the Robert F. Sibert Medal. She lives in Moscow, Pennsylvania.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780618440337
Subtitle:
World War I
Author:
Bartoletti, Susan
Author:
Bartoletti, Susan Campbell
Author:
Deem, James M.
Author:
Freedman, Russell
Publisher:
HMH Books for Young Readers
Subject:
History - United States/20th Century
Subject:
Social Issues - Prejudice & Racism
Subject:
People & Places - United States - African-American
Subject:
United States Race relations.
Subject:
Racism -- United States -- History.
Subject:
Situations / Prejudice & Racism
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Racism
Subject:
Children s Nonfiction-US History
Subject:
Holocaust
Subject:
Military & Wars
Subject:
K.K.K.; Klu Klux Klan; Hate groups; Hate speech; Hate crimes; American South; So
Subject:
history;wars;World War I;soldiers;photography;nonfiction;Freedman;world history;
Subject:
concentration camp;germany;world war II;nazis;hitler;jews;jewish;holocaust;nonfi
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20130402
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
black and white photographs
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 12

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Related Subjects

Children's » History » United States » General
Children's » Nonfiction » African American Studies
Children's » Nonfiction » US History
Children's » Nonfiction » World Cultures
Children's » People and Cultures
Young Adult » Nonfiction » History and Sociology
Young Adult » Nonfiction » Teen Issues

They Called Themselves the K.K.K.: The Birth of an American Terrorist Group Sale Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.98 In Stock
Product details 192 pages Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) - English 9780618440337 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this comprehensive, accessible account, Newbery Honor author Bartoletti (Hitler Youth) draws from documentary histories, slave narratives, newspapers, congressional testimony, and other sources to chronicle the origins and proliferation of the Ku Klux Klan against the charged backdrop of Reconstruction politics and legislation. Bartoletti uses the letters and diaries of the founders of the KKK--six former Confederate officers--as well as some informed speculation to explain their incentive for starting a 'club' to, in the words of an original member, 'protect property and preserve law and order.' The author lives up to her introductory promise to avoid censoring racist language and images, and includes some horrifying descriptions of lynchings and murders perpetuated during KKK raids on freedmen's homes, churches, and schools. Copious photos, engravings, and illustrations provide a hard-hitting graphic component to this illuminating book. And while Bartoletti notes that contemporary 'hate groups wield none of the power or prestige that the Ku Klux Klan held in earlier years,' her account of attending a Klan meeting while researching the book is chilling to the core. Ages 12 — up. (Aug.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by ,
Illustrated with archival photographs and drawings, this account reveals how this crushing evil was allowed to thrive.
"Synopsis" by ,
This absorbing and captivating nonfiction account (with never-before-published photographs) offers readers an in-depth anthropological and historical look into theand#160;lives of those who suffered and survived Breendonk concentration camp during the Holocaust of World Warand#160;II.and#160;
"Synopsis" by , In this clear and authoritative account, Russell Freedman illuminates for young readers the complex and rarely discussed subject of World War I, showing the ways in which the seeds of a second world war were sown in the first.
"Synopsis" by , Nonfiction master Russell Freedman illuminates for young readers the complex and rarely discussed subject of World War I. The tangled relationships and alliances of many nations, the introduction of modern weaponry, and top-level military decisions that resulted in thousands upon thousands of casualties all contributed to the "great war," which people hoped and believed would be the only conflict of its kind. In this clear and authoritative account, the Newbery Medal-winning author shows the ways in which the seeds of a second world war were sown in the first. Numerous archival photographs give the often disturbing subject matter a moving visual counterpart. Includes source notes, a bibliography, and an index.
"Synopsis" by , Boys, let us get up a club. With those words, six restless young men raided the linens at a friendand#8217;s mansion, pulled pillowcases over their heads, hopped on horses, and cavorted through the streets of Pulaski, Tennessee in 1866. The six friends named their club the Ku Klux Klan, and, all too quickly, their club grew into the self-proclaimed Invisible Empire with secret dens spread across the South. This is the story of how a secret terrorist group took root in Americaand#8217;s democracy. Filled with chilling and vivid personal accounts unearthed from oral histories, congressional documents, and diaries, this account from Newbery Honor-winning author Susan Campbell Bartoletti is a book to read and remember. A YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Finalist.
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