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1 Burnside MEMOIR- WELLNESS

Twin: A Memoir

by

Twin: A Memoir Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Shortly after his mother's death at 99 in 2005, Allen Shawn — the son of legendary New Yorker editor William Shawn and brother of actor and playwright Wallace Shawn — began writing Wish I Could Be There, a book about phobias grounded in his firsthand experience. To his surprise, his autistic twin sister, Mary, who had been institutionalized since they were eight and marginalized in his day-to-day existence for decades, emerged as a central figure in his life story."
Heller McAlpin, Los Angeles Times (Read the entire Los Angeles Times review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A heartbreaking yet deeply hopeful memoir about life as a twin in the face of autism.

When Allen Shawn and his twin sister, Mary, were two, Mary began exhibiting signs of what would be diagnosed many years later as autism. Understanding Mary and making her life a happy one appeared to be impossible for the Shawns. At the age of eight, with almost no warning, her parents sent Mary to a residential treatment center. She never lived at home again.

Fifty years later, as he probed the sources of his anxieties in Wish I Could Be There, Shawn realized that his fate was inextricably linked to his sister's, and that their natures were far from being different.

Twin highlights the difficulties American families coping with autism faced in the 1950s. Shawn also examines the secrets and family dramas as his father, William, became editor of the New Yorker. Twin reconstructs a parallel narrative for the two siblings, who experienced such divergent fates yet shared talents and proclivities. Wrenching, honest, understated, and poetic, Twin is at heart about the mystery of being inextricably bonded to someone who can never be truly understood.

Review:

"In his previous book Wish I Could Be There, Shawn explored his agoraphobia and claustrophobia. Here, Shawn, whose father is the former New Yorker editor William Shawn and his brother the playwright/actor Wallace Shawn, focuses on his twin sister, Mary, who early on is diagnosed with both mental retardation and autism, and institutionalized by the time she is eight. Shawn knows he cannot really penetrate Mary's world, but writes movingly of the lifelong effects of Mary's absence from his. Mary's 'sudden, virtually noiseless departure' results in a kind of 'survivor guilt,' so that 'for , to grow up and flourish would mean leaving Mary irrevocably behind.' He speculates that his father's inability to face the challenge of caring for her may have been a significant reason for his 37-year affair with colleague Lillian Ross. In addition to his reflections on his own emotional growth and creative evolution, Shawn steps out of the memoir genre to contribute a long informational chapter on how the thinking about autism has changed since it was first identified by Dr. Leo Kanner as a separate disorder from schizophrenia in the 1940s. Whether he's remembering Mary, the deaths of his parents, or his studies with Nadia Boulanger and other great musicians, Shawn writes poetically with honesty and empathy. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

When Allen Shawn and his twin sister, Mary, were two, Mary began exhibiting signs of what would be diagnosed many years later as autism. Fifty years later, Allen realized that his fate was inextricably linked to his sister's, and that their natures were far from being different.

Synopsis:

The revelatory, poignantand#160;story of Rosemary Kennedy, the eldest and eventually secreted-away Kennedy daughter, and how her life transformed her family, its women especially, and an entire nation

Synopsis:

They were the most prominent American family ofand#160;the twentieth century. The daughter they secreted away made all the difference.

Joe and Rose Kennedyandrsquo;s strikingly beautiful daughter Rosemary attended exclusive schools, was presented as a debutante to the Queen of England, and traveled the world with her high-spirited sisters. And yet, Rosemary was intellectually disabled andmdash; a secret fiercely guarded by her powerful and glamorous family.and#160;

and#160;
Major new sources andmdash; Rose Kennedyandrsquo;s diaries and correspondence, school and doctorsand#39; letters, and exclusive family interviews andmdash; bring Rosemary alive as a girl adored but left far behind by her competitive siblings. Kate Larson reveals both the sensitive care Rose and Joe gave to Rosemary and then andmdash; as the familyandrsquo;s standing reached an apex andmdash; the often desperate and duplicitous arrangements the Kennedys made to keep her away from home as she became increasingly intractable in her early twenties. Finally, Larson illuminates Joeandrsquo;s decision to have Rosemary lobotomized at age twenty-three, and the familyand#39;s complicity in keeping the secret.and#160;
and#160;
Rosemary delivers a profoundly moving coda: JFK visited Rosemary for the first time while campaigning in the Midwest; she had been living isolated in a Wisconsin institution for nearly twenty years. Only then did the siblings understand what had happened to Rosemary and bring her home for loving family visits. It was a reckoning that inspired them to direct attention to the plight of the disabled, transforming the lives of millions.

Synopsis:

A heartbreaking yet deeply hopeful memoir about life as a twin in the face of autism.

When Allen Shawn and his twin sister, Mary, were two, Mary began exhibiting signs of what would be diagnosed many years later as autism. Understanding Mary and making her life a happy one appeared to be impossible for the Shawns. At the age of eight, with almost no warning, her parents sent Mary to a residential treatment center. She never lived at home again.

Fifty years later, as he probed the sources of his anxieties in Wish I Could Be There, Shawn realized that his fate was inextricably linked to his sister's, and that their natures were far from being different.

Twin highlights the difficulties American families coping with autism faced in the 1950s. Shawn also examines the secrets and family dramas as his father, William, became editor of The New Yorker. Twin reconstructs a parallel narrative for the two siblings, who experienced such divergent fates yet shared talents and proclivities. Wrenching, honest, understated, and poetic, Twin is at heart about the mystery of being inextricably bonded to someone who can never be truly understood.

About the Author

Allen Shawn (born 1948) is an American composer, pianist, educator, and author who lives in Vermont.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780670022373
Subtitle:
The Hidden Kennedy Daughter
Author:
Shawn, Allen
Author:
Larson, Kate Clifford
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Subject:
Twins
Subject:
Autism -- Patients.
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Psychopathology - Autism
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Biography;American History;Catholic American History;Political Science;Kennedy F
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20151006
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
two 8pp inserts
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in
Age Level:
17-17

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Autism
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Memoirs

Twin: A Memoir Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Viking - English 9780670022373 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In his previous book Wish I Could Be There, Shawn explored his agoraphobia and claustrophobia. Here, Shawn, whose father is the former New Yorker editor William Shawn and his brother the playwright/actor Wallace Shawn, focuses on his twin sister, Mary, who early on is diagnosed with both mental retardation and autism, and institutionalized by the time she is eight. Shawn knows he cannot really penetrate Mary's world, but writes movingly of the lifelong effects of Mary's absence from his. Mary's 'sudden, virtually noiseless departure' results in a kind of 'survivor guilt,' so that 'for , to grow up and flourish would mean leaving Mary irrevocably behind.' He speculates that his father's inability to face the challenge of caring for her may have been a significant reason for his 37-year affair with colleague Lillian Ross. In addition to his reflections on his own emotional growth and creative evolution, Shawn steps out of the memoir genre to contribute a long informational chapter on how the thinking about autism has changed since it was first identified by Dr. Leo Kanner as a separate disorder from schizophrenia in the 1940s. Whether he's remembering Mary, the deaths of his parents, or his studies with Nadia Boulanger and other great musicians, Shawn writes poetically with honesty and empathy. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review A Day" by , "Shortly after his mother's death at 99 in 2005, Allen Shawn — the son of legendary New Yorker editor William Shawn and brother of actor and playwright Wallace Shawn — began writing Wish I Could Be There, a book about phobias grounded in his firsthand experience. To his surprise, his autistic twin sister, Mary, who had been institutionalized since they were eight and marginalized in his day-to-day existence for decades, emerged as a central figure in his life story."
(Read the entire Los Angeles Times review)
"Synopsis" by , When Allen Shawn and his twin sister, Mary, were two, Mary began exhibiting signs of what would be diagnosed many years later as autism. Fifty years later, Allen realized that his fate was inextricably linked to his sister's, and that their natures were far from being different.
"Synopsis" by ,

The revelatory, poignantand#160;story of Rosemary Kennedy, the eldest and eventually secreted-away Kennedy daughter, and how her life transformed her family, its women especially, and an entire nation

"Synopsis" by ,
They were the most prominent American family ofand#160;the twentieth century. The daughter they secreted away made all the difference.

Joe and Rose Kennedyandrsquo;s strikingly beautiful daughter Rosemary attended exclusive schools, was presented as a debutante to the Queen of England, and traveled the world with her high-spirited sisters. And yet, Rosemary was intellectually disabled andmdash; a secret fiercely guarded by her powerful and glamorous family.and#160;

and#160;
Major new sources andmdash; Rose Kennedyandrsquo;s diaries and correspondence, school and doctorsand#39; letters, and exclusive family interviews andmdash; bring Rosemary alive as a girl adored but left far behind by her competitive siblings. Kate Larson reveals both the sensitive care Rose and Joe gave to Rosemary and then andmdash; as the familyandrsquo;s standing reached an apex andmdash; the often desperate and duplicitous arrangements the Kennedys made to keep her away from home as she became increasingly intractable in her early twenties. Finally, Larson illuminates Joeandrsquo;s decision to have Rosemary lobotomized at age twenty-three, and the familyand#39;s complicity in keeping the secret.and#160;
and#160;
Rosemary delivers a profoundly moving coda: JFK visited Rosemary for the first time while campaigning in the Midwest; she had been living isolated in a Wisconsin institution for nearly twenty years. Only then did the siblings understand what had happened to Rosemary and bring her home for loving family visits. It was a reckoning that inspired them to direct attention to the plight of the disabled, transforming the lives of millions.

"Synopsis" by ,
A heartbreaking yet deeply hopeful memoir about life as a twin in the face of autism.

When Allen Shawn and his twin sister, Mary, were two, Mary began exhibiting signs of what would be diagnosed many years later as autism. Understanding Mary and making her life a happy one appeared to be impossible for the Shawns. At the age of eight, with almost no warning, her parents sent Mary to a residential treatment center. She never lived at home again.

Fifty years later, as he probed the sources of his anxieties in Wish I Could Be There, Shawn realized that his fate was inextricably linked to his sister's, and that their natures were far from being different.

Twin highlights the difficulties American families coping with autism faced in the 1950s. Shawn also examines the secrets and family dramas as his father, William, became editor of The New Yorker. Twin reconstructs a parallel narrative for the two siblings, who experienced such divergent fates yet shared talents and proclivities. Wrenching, honest, understated, and poetic, Twin is at heart about the mystery of being inextricably bonded to someone who can never be truly understood.

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