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The Taliban and the Crisis of Afghanistan

The Taliban and the Crisis of Afghanistan Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Taliban remain one of the most elusive forces in modern history. A ragtag collection of clerics and madrasa students, this obscure movement emerged out of the rubble of the Cold War to shock the world with their draconian Islamic order. The Taliban refused to surrender their vision even when confronted by the United States after September 11, 2001. Reinventing themselves as part of a broad insurgency that destabilized Afghanistan, they pledged to drive out the Americans, NATO, and their allies and restore their "Islamic Emirate."

The Taliban and the Crisis of Afghanistan explores the paradox at the center of this challenging phenomenon: how has a seemingly anachronistic band of religious zealots managed to retain a tenacious foothold in the struggle for Afghanistan's future? Grounding their analysis in a deep understanding of the country's past, leading scholars of Afghan history, politics, society, and culture show how the Taliban was less an attempt to revive a medieval theocracy than a dynamic, complex, and adaptive force rooted in the history of Afghanistan and shaped by modern international politics. Shunning journalistic accounts of its conspiratorial origins, the essays investigate broader questions relating to the character of the Taliban, its evolution over time, and its capacity to affect the future of the region.

Offering an invaluable guide to "what went wrong" with the American reconstruction project in Afghanistan, this book accounts for the persistence of a powerful and enigmatic movement while simultaneously mapping Afghanistan's enduring political crisis.

Review:

"Observers in the 1990s marveled to see the Taliban bring order to a chaotic Afghanistan after the Soviet withdrawal. Admiration vanished as the Taliban proceeded to oppress men as well as women and massacre opponents. When they refused to surrender Osama bin Laden after 9/11, the U.S. invasion helped sweep them from power. Then dismissed as reactionary zealots, the Taliban have since been revived and are now steadily expanding their influence. Historian Crews and reporter Tarzi have assembled eight revealing essays on this widely reviled movement. The Taliban are ethnic Pashtuns who make up perhaps half the country's population and whose elite have traditionally ruled the country. This ragtag army of Islamic clerics and religious students presented itself as a superior alternative to ruling Pashtun elites and successfully manipulated tribal politics. Despite accusations of being a medieval throwback, the Taliban are Islamic 'counter modernists.' Their use of mass spectacle, surveillance, the media and even their strict regulation of gender roles is consistent with other modern totalitarian movements. The authors' 58-page introduction adds additional clarity and context to Afghanistan's tortured history, making for an engrossing read that is more accessible than most academic collections." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Offering an invaluable guide to "what went wrong" with the American reconstruction project in Afghanistan, this book accounts for the persistence of a powerful and enigmatic movement while simultaneously mapping Afghanistans enduring political crisis.

About the Author

Robert D. Crewsis Assistant Professor of History at <>Stanford University.Amin Tarziis the Director of Middle East Studies, <>Marine Corps University.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Robert D. Crews and Amin Tarzi

1. Explaining the Taliban's Ability to Mobilize the Pashtuns
Abdulkader Sinno

2. The Rise and Fall of the Taliban
Neamatollah Nojumi

3. The Taliban, Women, and the Hegelian Private Sphere
Juan R.˚I. Cole

4. Taliban and Talibanism in Historical Perspective
M. Nazif Shahrani

5. Remembering the Taliban
Lutz Rzehak

6. Fraternity, Power, and Time in Central Asia
Robert L. Canfield

7. Moderate Taliban?
Robert D. Crews

8. The Neo-Taliban
Amin Tarzi

Epilogue: Afghanistan and the Pax Americana
Atiq Sarwari and Robert D. Crews

Notes

Contributors

Acknowledgments

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674026902
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Terrorism
Editor:
Crews, Robert D.
Editor:
Tarzi, Amin
Author:
Crews, Robert D.
Author:
Tarzi, Amin
Subject:
World - General
Subject:
Islamic Studies
Subject:
History
Subject:
Afghanistan
Subject:
World
Subject:
Asia - Central Asia
Subject:
Taliban
Subject:
Afghanistan - History - 1989-2001
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
February 2008
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
4 maps
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Asia » Afghanistan
History and Social Science » World History » Asia » General

The Taliban and the Crisis of Afghanistan
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 448 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674026902 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Observers in the 1990s marveled to see the Taliban bring order to a chaotic Afghanistan after the Soviet withdrawal. Admiration vanished as the Taliban proceeded to oppress men as well as women and massacre opponents. When they refused to surrender Osama bin Laden after 9/11, the U.S. invasion helped sweep them from power. Then dismissed as reactionary zealots, the Taliban have since been revived and are now steadily expanding their influence. Historian Crews and reporter Tarzi have assembled eight revealing essays on this widely reviled movement. The Taliban are ethnic Pashtuns who make up perhaps half the country's population and whose elite have traditionally ruled the country. This ragtag army of Islamic clerics and religious students presented itself as a superior alternative to ruling Pashtun elites and successfully manipulated tribal politics. Despite accusations of being a medieval throwback, the Taliban are Islamic 'counter modernists.' Their use of mass spectacle, surveillance, the media and even their strict regulation of gender roles is consistent with other modern totalitarian movements. The authors' 58-page introduction adds additional clarity and context to Afghanistan's tortured history, making for an engrossing read that is more accessible than most academic collections." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Offering an invaluable guide to "what went wrong" with the American reconstruction project in Afghanistan, this book accounts for the persistence of a powerful and enigmatic movement while simultaneously mapping Afghanistans enduring political crisis.
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