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Sea Clocks: The Story of Longitude

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Sea Clocks: The Story of Longitude Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Bandgt; "For hundreds of years ships had been sailing to places far and near andlt;Iandgt;without really knowing where they were!"andlt;/Iandgt;andlt;/Bandgt; andlt;BRandgt; Sailors knew how to measure latitude, their location north or south of the equator, but they could not measure longitude, their location east or west of their home port. Because of this, many lives were lost worldwide. The key to solving this problem lay in devising a clock that could keep absolutely accurate time while at sea, unaltered by rough water or weather conditions. With such a timekeeper sailors would be able to know the time back at their home port and calculate the longitude. But no one knew how to design such a clock. andlt;BRandgt; John Harrison (1693-1776), an Englishman without any scientific training, worked tirelessly for more than forty years to create a perfect clock. The solution to this problem was so important that an award of 20,000 pounds sterling (equal to several million dollars today) was established by the English Parliament in 1714. Harrison won recognition for his work in 1773. andlt;BRandgt; Together with beautifully detailed pictures by Erik Blegvad, Louise Borden's text takes the reader through the drama, disappointments, and successes that filled Harrison's quest to invent the perfect sea clock.

Synopsis:

"For hundreds of years ships had been sailing to places far and near without really knowing where they were!"

Sailors knew how to measure latitude, their location north or south of the equator, but they could not measure longitude, their location east or west of their home port. Because of this, many lives were lost worldwide. The key to solving this problem lay in devising a clock that could keep absolutely accurate time while at sea, unaltered by rough water or weather conditions. With such a timekeeper sailors would be able to know the time back at their home port and calculate the longitude. But no one knew how to design such a clock.

John Harrison (1693-1776), an Englishman without any scientific training, worked tirelessly for more than forty years to create a perfect clock. The solution to this problem was so important that an award of 20,000 pounds sterling (equal to several million dollars today) was established by the English Parliament in 1714. Harrison won recognition for his work in 1773.

Together with beautifully detailed pictures by Erik Blegvad, Louise Borden's text takes the reader through the drama, disappointments, and successes that filled Harrison's quest to invent the perfect sea clock.

Synopsis:

John Harrison, an Englishman with no scientific training, worked for nearly 40 years to design a clock that could keep accurate time while at sea. Ultimately, he changed the course of seafaring and science forever. Full color.

About the Author

Louise Borden is the author of more than twenty books for children, whose awards include the prestigious Christopher Medal. She lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, and the Washington, D.C. metro area, and can be visited at louiseborden.com. Erik Blegvad was born in Denmark and studied at the School of Applied Arts in Copenhagen. Mr. Blegvad has illustrated more than one hundred children's books, including Twelve Tales by Hans Christian Andersen, Riddle Road by Elizabeth Spires, Hurry, Hurry, Mary Dear! by N. M. Bodecker, and Sea Clocks: The Story of Longitude by Louise Borden. The Blegvads divide their time between England, France, and Wardsboro, Vermont.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780689842160
ill.:
Blegvad, Erik,
Publisher:
Margaret K. McElderry Books
Illustrator:
Blegvad, Erik
Author:
Blegvad, Erik
Author:
Borden, Louise
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Clock and watch makers
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Science
Subject:
Inventors
Subject:
Clocks and watches
Subject:
Longitude
Subject:
Chronometers
Subject:
Clocks and watch makers
Subject:
Earth Sciences - Geography
Subject:
Exploration & Discovery
Subject:
Harrison, John
Subject:
Geography-General
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
B221
Series Volume:
965
Publication Date:
February 2004
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 2 up to 5
Language:
English
Illustrations:
f-c jacket; f-c alternating with 1-color
Pages:
48
Dimensions:
10 x 8 in 15.015 oz
Age Level:
07-10

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Related Subjects

Children's » History » World History
Children's » Nonfiction » Biographies
Children's » Nonfiction » Geography
Children's » Nonfiction » World History » General
History and Social Science » Geography » General
Young Adult » Nonfiction » Biographies

Sea Clocks: The Story of Longitude Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 48 pages Margaret K. McElderry Books - English 9780689842160 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

"For hundreds of years ships had been sailing to places far and near without really knowing where they were!"

Sailors knew how to measure latitude, their location north or south of the equator, but they could not measure longitude, their location east or west of their home port. Because of this, many lives were lost worldwide. The key to solving this problem lay in devising a clock that could keep absolutely accurate time while at sea, unaltered by rough water or weather conditions. With such a timekeeper sailors would be able to know the time back at their home port and calculate the longitude. But no one knew how to design such a clock.

John Harrison (1693-1776), an Englishman without any scientific training, worked tirelessly for more than forty years to create a perfect clock. The solution to this problem was so important that an award of 20,000 pounds sterling (equal to several million dollars today) was established by the English Parliament in 1714. Harrison won recognition for his work in 1773.

Together with beautifully detailed pictures by Erik Blegvad, Louise Borden's text takes the reader through the drama, disappointments, and successes that filled Harrison's quest to invent the perfect sea clock.

"Synopsis" by , John Harrison, an Englishman with no scientific training, worked for nearly 40 years to design a clock that could keep accurate time while at sea. Ultimately, he changed the course of seafaring and science forever. Full color.
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