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1 Beaverton Children's Young Adult- General

Godless

by

Godless Cover

ISBN13: 9780689862786
ISBN10: 0689862784
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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Awards

Winner of the 2004 National Book Award in Young People's Literature

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"'I refuse to speak further of the Ten-legged One...but the more I think about it, the more I like it. Why mess around with Catholicism when you can have your own customized religion? All you need is a disciple or two...and a god.'"

Fed up with his parents' boring old religion, agnostic-going-on-atheist Jason Bock invents a new god — the town's water tower. He recruits an unlikely group of worshippers: his snail-farming best friend, Shin, cute-as-a-button (whatever "that" means) Magda Price, and the violent and unpredictable Henry Stagg. As their religion grows, it takes on a life of its own. While Jason struggles to keep the faith pure, Shin obsesses over writing their bible, and the explosive Henry schemes to make the new faith even more exciting — and dangerous.

When the Chutengodians hold their first ceremony high atop the dome of the water tower, things quickly go from merely dangerous to terrifying and deadly. Jason soon realizes that inventing a religion is a lot easier than controlling it, but control it he must, before his creation destroys both his friends and himself.

Pete Hautman, author of Sweetblood and Mr. Was, has written a compelling novel about the power of religion on those who believe, and on those who don't.

Review:

"'Why mess around with Catholicism when you can have your own customized religion? All you need is a disciple or two. And a god.' So says narrator Jason Bock, a high schooler rebelling against the church 'outreach' program his father insists he attend. On the spur of the moment, he starts his own church, the Chutengodians, who worship the 'Ten-legged God' their town's water tower. It begins as a joke, with Jason and his friends creating rules that he thinks are as arbitrary as the rules of the Catholic Church (they observe Sabbath on Tuesday, the first commandment is 'thou shalt not be a jerk'), but Jason's 'followers' begin taking the new religion seriously. Many teens will likely recognize or identify with Hautman's (Sweetblood; Mr. Was) religious critiques; others may be offended (discussing Holy Communion, Jason describes the host as 'a sliver of Jesus meat. But they make the host as different from meat as they can, so that even though communion is a form of cannibalism, nobody gets grossed out'). However, while Hautman pushes his satirical story line to the limit, he doesn't bring to it the depth or subtlety of his previous works (for example, Jason's dare to others to disprove that the water tower is God doesn't elicit the obvious response that the tower is man-made). The result is a provocative plot, but not an entirely challenging novel. Ages 12-up. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Anyone who has questioned his or her religion, especially as a teenager, will respond to Jason's struggles with belief. Many individuals, upon reading this, will consider their own questions once more." Booklist (Starred Review)

Review:

"[T]hought-provoking and disturbing." School Library Journal

Review:

"[T]he real strength of this novel lies in Hautman's sympathetic rendering of the everyday anarchy of adolescence." Children's Literature

Review:

"Inventive, frequently funny and sometimes scary, this...novel has a lot to offer readers." KLIATT

Review:

"Jason's explorations of faith, belief, and religion, told in a compelling and imaginative voice, will leave him a solitary, ostracized prophet. Thought-provoking and unique." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"The book expertly captures the blend of snarky humorousness and seriousness with which young people often launch ideas — though Jason doesn't believe in the Ten Legged God per se, he's making a genuine inquiry into the nature of belief, and he's also sincerely struggling with questions about the consequences of his actions." Deborah Stevenson, Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Synopsis:

As a joke, agnostic-going-on-atheist Jason Bock invents his own religion: the worship of his town's water tower. But what starts as a loose congregation of Jason's friend Shin and some classmates soon takes on a power of its own.

Synopsis:

"I refuse to speak further of the Ten-legged One...but the more I think about it, the more I like it. Why mess around with Catholicism when you can have your own customized religion? All you need is a disciple or two...and a god."

Fed up with his parents' boring old religion, agnostic-going-on-atheist Jason Bock invents a new god — the town's water tower. He recruits an unlikely group of worshippers: his snail-farming best friend, Shin, cute-as-a-button (whatever that means) Magda Price, and the violent and unpredictable Henry Stagg. As their religion grows, it takes on a life of its own. While Jason struggles to keep the faith pure, Shin obsesses over writing their bible, and the explosive Henry schemes to make the new faith even more exciting — and dangerous.

When the Chutengodians hold their first ceremony high atop the dome of the water tower, things quickly go from merely dangerous to terrifying and deadly. Jason soon realizes that inventing a religion is a lot easier than controlling it, but control it he must, before his creation destroys both his friends and himself.

Pete Hautman, author of Sweetblood and Mr. Was, has written a compelling novel about the power of religion on those who believe, and on those who don't.

About the Author

andlt;Bandgt;Pete Hautmanandlt;/Bandgt; is the author of andlt;Iandgt;Godlessandlt;/Iandgt;, which won the National Book Award, and many other critically acclaimed books for teens and adults, including andlt;Iandgt;Blank Confessionandlt;/Iandgt;, andlt;Iandgt;All-Inandlt;/Iandgt;, andlt;Iandgt;Rashandlt;/Iandgt;, andlt;Iandgt;No Limitandlt;/Iandgt;, andlt;Iandgt;Invisibleandlt;/Iandgt;, and andlt;Iandgt;Mr. Wasandlt;/Iandgt;, which was nominated for an Edgar Award by the Mystery Writers of America. Pete lives in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Visit him at PeteHautman.com.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com, January 14, 2014 (view all comments by Courtesy of Mother Daughter Book Club com)
If Henry Stagg would not have hit him, Jason Bock would not have been lying on his back staring up at his town’s water tower. And if he would not have looked up at the water tower, he may never have gotten the idea to create a new religion built around his newly created god, the Ten-Legged One. But when he does, he recruits a strange mix into the fold��"his buddy Shin, a collector of snails and other gastropods, cute Magda Price, the preacher’s son Dan, and the bully Henry.

The five of them create an uneasy alliance that reflects their general restlessness and willingness to embrace a radical idea just to shake things up. Jason in particular is questioning his belief in God, especially as his dad has an unwavering faith and requires Jason to attend teen classes at their church. He wonders that with all the religions in the world how anyone can know that theirs is right. It’s the next leap he takes��"that it’s better to make up your own��"that get’s the ball rolling for creating sacraments, commandments and converts. Soon, they are all taking the risk of climbing to the top of the tower to worship their new god.

Jason realizes that he is no longer in control of what he has created. Shin in particular seems to be caught up in the fervor of it all as he writes out a scripture for the new church, and tension builds between the members. Can their issues be resolved without anyone getting hurt?

Godless by Pete Hautman is a thoughtful book that examines religious belief, the sway that peer pressure and suggestion holds over teens, and the risky behavior they may undertake because of that pressure. Readers will be inspired to look at their own beliefs about God and religion and think about why they hold those beliefs. It’s a bold subject for mother-daughter book clubs to take on, but those that do may find possibilities for rich discussion. I recommend Godless for groups with girls aged 14 and up.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
toojoyous, April 17, 2007 (view all comments by toojoyous)
I couldn't stop reading the book. Good humor even for an adult.
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(11 of 14 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780689862786
Author:
Hautman, Pete
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Author:
Pritzker, Burton
Location:
New York
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - General
Subject:
Religious - General
Subject:
Social Situations - General
Subject:
Social Situations - Adolescence
Subject:
Social Situations - Peer Pressure
Subject:
Children's 12-Up - Fiction - Religious
Subject:
Water towers.
Subject:
Situations / Adolescence
Subject:
Children s All Ages - Religion - Contemporary Issues
Subject:
Social Issues - General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Hardback
Series Volume:
13
Publication Date:
June 2004
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
f/c jkt
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 10.57 oz
Age Level:
12-17

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Situations » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship
Young Adult » General

Godless Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing - English 9780689862786 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'Why mess around with Catholicism when you can have your own customized religion? All you need is a disciple or two. And a god.' So says narrator Jason Bock, a high schooler rebelling against the church 'outreach' program his father insists he attend. On the spur of the moment, he starts his own church, the Chutengodians, who worship the 'Ten-legged God' their town's water tower. It begins as a joke, with Jason and his friends creating rules that he thinks are as arbitrary as the rules of the Catholic Church (they observe Sabbath on Tuesday, the first commandment is 'thou shalt not be a jerk'), but Jason's 'followers' begin taking the new religion seriously. Many teens will likely recognize or identify with Hautman's (Sweetblood; Mr. Was) religious critiques; others may be offended (discussing Holy Communion, Jason describes the host as 'a sliver of Jesus meat. But they make the host as different from meat as they can, so that even though communion is a form of cannibalism, nobody gets grossed out'). However, while Hautman pushes his satirical story line to the limit, he doesn't bring to it the depth or subtlety of his previous works (for example, Jason's dare to others to disprove that the water tower is God doesn't elicit the obvious response that the tower is man-made). The result is a provocative plot, but not an entirely challenging novel. Ages 12-up. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Anyone who has questioned his or her religion, especially as a teenager, will respond to Jason's struggles with belief. Many individuals, upon reading this, will consider their own questions once more."
"Review" by , "[T]hought-provoking and disturbing."
"Review" by , "[T]he real strength of this novel lies in Hautman's sympathetic rendering of the everyday anarchy of adolescence."
"Review" by , "Inventive, frequently funny and sometimes scary, this...novel has a lot to offer readers."
"Review" by , "Jason's explorations of faith, belief, and religion, told in a compelling and imaginative voice, will leave him a solitary, ostracized prophet. Thought-provoking and unique."
"Review" by , "The book expertly captures the blend of snarky humorousness and seriousness with which young people often launch ideas — though Jason doesn't believe in the Ten Legged God per se, he's making a genuine inquiry into the nature of belief, and he's also sincerely struggling with questions about the consequences of his actions."
"Synopsis" by , As a joke, agnostic-going-on-atheist Jason Bock invents his own religion: the worship of his town's water tower. But what starts as a loose congregation of Jason's friend Shin and some classmates soon takes on a power of its own.
"Synopsis" by , "I refuse to speak further of the Ten-legged One...but the more I think about it, the more I like it. Why mess around with Catholicism when you can have your own customized religion? All you need is a disciple or two...and a god."

Fed up with his parents' boring old religion, agnostic-going-on-atheist Jason Bock invents a new god — the town's water tower. He recruits an unlikely group of worshippers: his snail-farming best friend, Shin, cute-as-a-button (whatever that means) Magda Price, and the violent and unpredictable Henry Stagg. As their religion grows, it takes on a life of its own. While Jason struggles to keep the faith pure, Shin obsesses over writing their bible, and the explosive Henry schemes to make the new faith even more exciting — and dangerous.

When the Chutengodians hold their first ceremony high atop the dome of the water tower, things quickly go from merely dangerous to terrifying and deadly. Jason soon realizes that inventing a religion is a lot easier than controlling it, but control it he must, before his creation destroys both his friends and himself.

Pete Hautman, author of Sweetblood and Mr. Was, has written a compelling novel about the power of religion on those who believe, and on those who don't.

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