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1 Beaverton Children's Middle Readers- General

Lunch Money

by

Lunch Money Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Greg Kenton has always had a natural talent for making money — despite the annoying rivalry of his neighbor Maura Shaw. Then, just before sixth grade, Greg makes a discovery: Almost every kid at school has an extra quarter or two to spend almost every day. andlt;BRandgt; Multiply a few quarters by a few hundred kids, and for Greg, school suddenly looks like a giant piggy bank. All he needs is the right hammer to crack it open. Candy and gum? Little toys? Sure, kids would love to buy stuff like that at school. But would teachers and the principal permit it? Not likely. andlt;BRandgt; But how about comic books? Comic books might work. Especially the chunky little ones that Greg writes and illustrates himself. Because everybody knows that school always encourages reading and writing and creativity and individual initiative, right? andlt;BRandgt; In this funny and timely novel, Andrew Clements again holds up a mirror to real life, and invites young readers to think about money, school, friendship, and what it means to be a success.

Review:

"Clements's (Frindle) offers an uncharacteristically thin novel introducing a boy who excels at athletics and academics — and is a whiz at drawing — but whose 'greatest talent had always been money.' In preschool Greg did his older brothers' chores for pay; in nursery school he recycled his family's trash and kept the bottle and can deposit refunds; and by third grade he had 'set himself a goal. He wanted to be rich.' Now a fifth grader, Greg decides that 'school would be an excellent place to make his fortune.' Yet his business ventures selling candy and gum, novelty toys and homemade comic books land him in hot water with the principal. Though this young tycoon's ambitious aspirations and laughable arrogance are entertaining, the pace of the story slackens considerably at its midpoint, when Greg teams up with Maura, another talented artist and his longstanding rival, to launch a line of mini-comic books. Clements delivers a meaningful message about friendship, perseverance and proper priorities. But although Greg and Maura are likable and spunky, the detailed descriptions of how they create their debut books and petition the School Committee for permission to market them to fellow students grow tedious. Ages 8-12. (July)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Greg Kenton has always had a natural talent for making money — despite the annoying rivalry of his neighbor Maura Shaw. Then, just before sixth grade, Greg makes a discovery: Almost every kid at school has an extra quarter or two to spend almost every day.

Multiply a few quarters by a few hundred kids, and for Greg, school suddenly looks like a giant piggy bank. All he needs is the right hammer to crack it open. Candy and gum? Little toys? Sure, kids would love to buy stuff like that at school. But would teachers and the principal permit it? Not likely.

But how about comic books? Comic books might work. Especially the chunky little ones that Greg writes and illustrates himself. Because everybody knows that school always encourages reading and writing and creativity and individual initiative, right?

In this funny and timely novel, Andrew Clements again holds up a mirror to real life, and invites young readers to think about money, school, friendship, and what it means to be a success.

Synopsis:

Tucker MacBean's father has left and his mother is always either at work or in class, trying to finish college.and#160; This leaves Tucker to watch out for his younger brother, Beech, while they secretly try to save up enough money so that their mother can quit her job.and#160; When Tucker's favorite comic has a contest for kids to create the hero's new sidekick, he hopes he has found a way to help his mother and fix his family — all he has to do is create the winning supercomic.and#160;and#160;

and#160;and#160;and#160; With thoughtful characterizations --and#160; including Tucker's brother who has special needs — copious black-and-white comic-book-like art, and an engaging storyline, this middle grade novel has humor, an enterprising main character, and the appeal of a comic-book adventure.

About the Author

Lisa Harkrader's debut novel,AIRBALL: My Life in Briefs(Roaring Brook), was a Bank Street College Best book of the year, a Texas Lonestar Award Nominee, a Junior Library Guild Selection, and New York Public Library Best book for the Teen Age. She makes her home with her family on a farm in Kansas.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780689866838
Author:
Selznick, Brian
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Illustrator:
Selznick, Brian
Author:
Selznick, Brian
Author:
Harkrader, Lisa
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Fiction - General
Subject:
Social Situations - Friendship
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Subject:
Schools
Subject:
School & Education
Subject:
Family - Parents
Subject:
Business, Careers, Occupations
Subject:
Cartoons and comics
Subject:
Interpersonal Relations
Subject:
Family - Marriage & Divorce
Subject:
Children s humor
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
June 2005
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 4 to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
75 black-and-white illustrations
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
08-12

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Humor
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Reference » Careers

Lunch Money Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing - English 9780689866838 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Clements's (Frindle) offers an uncharacteristically thin novel introducing a boy who excels at athletics and academics — and is a whiz at drawing — but whose 'greatest talent had always been money.' In preschool Greg did his older brothers' chores for pay; in nursery school he recycled his family's trash and kept the bottle and can deposit refunds; and by third grade he had 'set himself a goal. He wanted to be rich.' Now a fifth grader, Greg decides that 'school would be an excellent place to make his fortune.' Yet his business ventures selling candy and gum, novelty toys and homemade comic books land him in hot water with the principal. Though this young tycoon's ambitious aspirations and laughable arrogance are entertaining, the pace of the story slackens considerably at its midpoint, when Greg teams up with Maura, another talented artist and his longstanding rival, to launch a line of mini-comic books. Clements delivers a meaningful message about friendship, perseverance and proper priorities. But although Greg and Maura are likable and spunky, the detailed descriptions of how they create their debut books and petition the School Committee for permission to market them to fellow students grow tedious. Ages 8-12. (July)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Greg Kenton has always had a natural talent for making money — despite the annoying rivalry of his neighbor Maura Shaw. Then, just before sixth grade, Greg makes a discovery: Almost every kid at school has an extra quarter or two to spend almost every day.

Multiply a few quarters by a few hundred kids, and for Greg, school suddenly looks like a giant piggy bank. All he needs is the right hammer to crack it open. Candy and gum? Little toys? Sure, kids would love to buy stuff like that at school. But would teachers and the principal permit it? Not likely.

But how about comic books? Comic books might work. Especially the chunky little ones that Greg writes and illustrates himself. Because everybody knows that school always encourages reading and writing and creativity and individual initiative, right?

In this funny and timely novel, Andrew Clements again holds up a mirror to real life, and invites young readers to think about money, school, friendship, and what it means to be a success.

"Synopsis" by ,
Tucker MacBean's father has left and his mother is always either at work or in class, trying to finish college.and#160; This leaves Tucker to watch out for his younger brother, Beech, while they secretly try to save up enough money so that their mother can quit her job.and#160; When Tucker's favorite comic has a contest for kids to create the hero's new sidekick, he hopes he has found a way to help his mother and fix his family — all he has to do is create the winning supercomic.and#160;and#160;

and#160;and#160;and#160; With thoughtful characterizations --and#160; including Tucker's brother who has special needs — copious black-and-white comic-book-like art, and an engaging storyline, this middle grade novel has humor, an enterprising main character, and the appeal of a comic-book adventure.

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