Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | April 11, 2014

Paul Laudiero: IMG Shit Rough Draft



I was sitting in a British and Irish romantic drama class my last semester in college when the idea for Shit Rough Drafts hit me. I was working... Continue »
  1. $9.07 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

Undue Risk: Secret State Experiments on Humans

Undue Risk: Secret State Experiments on Humans Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Unethical experimentation will always be with us, Dr. Moreno wrote, but if secrecy is limited and good model experimental programs can be developed, the abuses may be limited.

--Philip J. Hilts, New York Times

In 1994, Jonathan Moreno became a senior staff member of a special commission created by President Clinton to investigate allegations of government-sponsored radiation research on unknowing citizens during the cold war. The top secret documents he helped to declassify revealed a shocking truth-- that human experimentation played an extensive role in this country's attempts to build and protect against weapons of mass destruction.

In Undue Risk, Moreno presents the first comprehensive history of the use of human subjects in atomic, biological, and chemical warfare experiments from World War II to the twenty-first century. From the courtrooms of Nuremberg to the battlefields of the Gulf War, Undue Risk explores a variety of government policies and specific cases, including plutonium injections into unwitting hospital patients, U.S. government attempts to recruit Nazi medical scientists, the subjection of soldiers to atomic blast fallout, secret LSD and mescaline studies, and the feeding of irradiated oatmeal to children. It is also the first book to go behind the scenes and reveal the government's struggle with the ethics of human experimentation and the evolution of agonizing policy choices on unfamiliar moral terrain.

As the threat of foreign and domestic terrorist attack continues to grow, the need for our country to defend itself against insidious weapons is greater than ever. Can a democracy justify using humans in potentially risky experiments in order to answer scientific questions vital to national security? Exploring the possibilities, Undue Risk highlights a program of human experimentation that is a moral model for all others, civilian and military.

JONATHAN MORENO, a former senior staff member of President Clinton's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, is Kornfeld Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University if Virginia. He is also Senior Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University, a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, an Adjunct Associate of the Hastings Center, and a member of the board of directors of the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics. A regular bioethics columnist for abcnews.com, Moreno is the author of Deciding Together: Bioethics and Moral Consensus. He lives in Charlottesville, Virginia and Washington, D.C.

Book News Annotation:

Moreno (biomedical ethics, U. of Virginia) was a former staff member of president Clinton's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments in 1994 and 1995. When the committee was finished, he continued his inquiry and expanded it to encompass biological and chemical testing. He reveals experiments from the end of World War II to the Gulf War and the Balkans, and explores the evolution of government policy. He does not include lurid photographs.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Moreno presents the shocking history on the use of human subjects in atomic, biological and chemical warfare experiments, from plutonium injections to LSD and mescaline studies.

Synopsis:

Praise for Undue Risk

From the horrific Nazi experiments of the concentration camps to the egregious efforts in the United States to research radiation and biological warfare, Jonathan Moreno presents a compelling historical narrative of how the claims of military science have often warped the ethics of human experimentation. Undue Risk is a powerful and human call for moral vigilance as we face complex issues of medical research in the present and future.

--Allan M. Brandt, Kass Professor of the History of Medicine, Harvard University

Moreno has accomplished something rare in Undue Risk. Its value lies not only in the care with which he has dug deep into primary sources to add significant details to familiar events-- such as the Nuremberg trials-- but in the way it reveals to scholars, politicians, and the public the role that bioethical thought may play in the future construction of domestic and foreign policy.

--Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., Executive Director, National Bioethics Advisory Commission

Jonathan Moreno has written a thoughtful, balanced, and much needed account of the different forces that in recent decades have caused various saints and devils to overlook or set aside the moral status of persons recruited (voluntarily or involuntarily) into medical experiments. Undue Risk should be mandatory reading for all those concerned with not only the protection of human subjects but the appropriate moral underpinnings of government action in a liberal democracy.

--Harold T. Shapiro, President, Princeton University; Chairman, National Bioethics Advisory Commission

Synopsis:

In 1994, Jonathan Moreno became a senior staff member of a special commission created by President Clinton to investigate allegations of government-sponsored radiation research on unknowing citizens during the cold war. The top secret documents he helped to declassify revealed a shocking truth-- that human experimentation played an extensive role in this country's attempts to build and protect against weapons of mass destruction.

In Undue Risk, Moreno presents the first comprehensive history of the use of human subjects in atomic, biological, and chemical warfare experiments from World War II to the twenty-first century. From the courtrooms of Nuremberg to the battlefields of the Gulf War, Undue Risk explores a variety of government policies and specific cases, including plutonium injections into unwitting hospital patients, U.S. government attempts to recruit Nazi medical scientists, the subjection of soldiers to atomic blast fallout, secret LSD and mescaline studies, and the feeding of irradiated oatmeal to children. It is also the first book to go behind the scenes and reveal the government's struggle with the ethics of human experimentation and the evolution of agonizing policy choices on unfamiliar moral terrain.

As the threat of foreign and domestic terrorist attack continues to grow, the need for our country to defend itself against insidious weapons is greater than ever. Can a democracy justify using humans in potentially risky experiments in order to answer scientific questions vital to national security? Exploring the possibilities, Undue Risk highlights a program of human experimentation that is a moral model for all others, civilian and military.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 299-333) and index.

About the Author

Jonathan Moreno, a former senior staff member of President Clinton's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, is Kornfeld Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University if Virginia. He is also Senior Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University, a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, an Adjunct Associate of the Hastings Center, and a member of the board of directors of the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics. A regular bioethics columnist for abcnews.com, Moreno is the author of Deciding Together: Bioethics and Moral Consensus. He lives in Charlottesville, Virginia and Washington, D.C.

Table of Contents

The long road to Salman Pak — The home front : our science, our boys — Nuremberg's shadow — Deals with devils — The radiation experiments — The Pentagon meets the Nuremberg Code — In the wilderness — The rules change — Once more into the Gulf.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780716731429
Subtitle:
Secret State Experiments on Humans
Author:
Moreno, Jonathan D.
Author:
Moreno
Author:
Josephson, Paul R.
Publisher:
W. H. Freeman
Location:
New York :
Subject:
History
Subject:
Ethics
Subject:
Testing
Subject:
Medical ethics
Subject:
Ethics, Medical
Subject:
Former Soviet republics
Subject:
Russia
Subject:
Nuclear energy
Subject:
Human experimentation in medicine
Subject:
Weapons of mass destruction
Subject:
Nuclear industry
Subject:
Medical ethics -- United States.
Subject:
Human experimentation.
Subject:
Informed consent.
Subject:
âEthique mâedicale
Subject:
Expâerimentation humaine en mâedecine
Subject:
Military - Weapons
Subject:
Military/Biological
Subject:
Chemical warfare
Edition Number:
1
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
State Secrets
Series Volume:
1
Publication Date:
19990911
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9.55x6.53x1.45 in. 1.47 lbs.

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine

Undue Risk: Secret State Experiments on Humans
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 368 pages W. H. Freeman - English 9780716731429 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Moreno presents the shocking history on the use of human subjects in atomic, biological and chemical warfare experiments, from plutonium injections to LSD and mescaline studies.
"Synopsis" by ,
Praise for Undue Risk

From the horrific Nazi experiments of the concentration camps to the egregious efforts in the United States to research radiation and biological warfare, Jonathan Moreno presents a compelling historical narrative of how the claims of military science have often warped the ethics of human experimentation. Undue Risk is a powerful and human call for moral vigilance as we face complex issues of medical research in the present and future.

--Allan M. Brandt, Kass Professor of the History of Medicine, Harvard University

Moreno has accomplished something rare in Undue Risk. Its value lies not only in the care with which he has dug deep into primary sources to add significant details to familiar events-- such as the Nuremberg trials-- but in the way it reveals to scholars, politicians, and the public the role that bioethical thought may play in the future construction of domestic and foreign policy.

--Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., Executive Director, National Bioethics Advisory Commission

Jonathan Moreno has written a thoughtful, balanced, and much needed account of the different forces that in recent decades have caused various saints and devils to overlook or set aside the moral status of persons recruited (voluntarily or involuntarily) into medical experiments. Undue Risk should be mandatory reading for all those concerned with not only the protection of human subjects but the appropriate moral underpinnings of government action in a liberal democracy.

--Harold T. Shapiro, President, Princeton University; Chairman, National Bioethics Advisory Commission

"Synopsis" by ,
In 1994, Jonathan Moreno became a senior staff member of a special commission created by President Clinton to investigate allegations of government-sponsored radiation research on unknowing citizens during the cold war. The top secret documents he helped to declassify revealed a shocking truth-- that human experimentation played an extensive role in this country's attempts to build and protect against weapons of mass destruction.

In Undue Risk, Moreno presents the first comprehensive history of the use of human subjects in atomic, biological, and chemical warfare experiments from World War II to the twenty-first century. From the courtrooms of Nuremberg to the battlefields of the Gulf War, Undue Risk explores a variety of government policies and specific cases, including plutonium injections into unwitting hospital patients, U.S. government attempts to recruit Nazi medical scientists, the subjection of soldiers to atomic blast fallout, secret LSD and mescaline studies, and the feeding of irradiated oatmeal to children. It is also the first book to go behind the scenes and reveal the government's struggle with the ethics of human experimentation and the evolution of agonizing policy choices on unfamiliar moral terrain.

As the threat of foreign and domestic terrorist attack continues to grow, the need for our country to defend itself against insidious weapons is greater than ever. Can a democracy justify using humans in potentially risky experiments in order to answer scientific questions vital to national security? Exploring the possibilities, Undue Risk highlights a program of human experimentation that is a moral model for all others, civilian and military.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.