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1 Beaverton Literature- A to Z

Bird Cloud: A Memoir

by

Bird Cloud: A Memoir Cover

ISBN13: 9780743288804
ISBN10: 0743288807
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $4.50!

 

Staff Pick

Annie Proulx's love of research transforms this tale of home-building into a chronicle of its Wyoming locale — the wildlife, weather, Native American history, and present-day ranchers. Seasoned with stories from Proulx's own French Canadian roots, Bird Cloud is a fascinating book.
Recommended by Kelly L., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Bird Cloud is the name Annie Proulx gave to 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie and four-hundred-foot cliffs plunging down to the North Platte River. On the day she first visited, a cloud in the shape of a bird hung in the evening sky. Proulx also saw pelicans, bald eagles, golden eagles, great blue herons, ravens, scores of bluebirds, harriers, kestrels, elk, deer and a dozen antelope. She fell in love with the land, then owned by the Nature Conservancy, and she knew what she wanted to build on it — a house in harmony with her work, her appetites, and her character, a library surrounded by bedrooms and a kitchen.

Proulx's first work of nonfiction in more than twenty years, Bird Cloud is the story of designing and constructing that house — with its solar panels, Japanese soak tub, concrete floor and elk horn handles on kitchen cabinets. It is also an enthralling natural history and archaeology of the region — inhabited for millennia by Ute, Arapaho and Shoshone Indians — and a family history, going back to nineteenth-century Mississippi riverboat captains and Canadian settlers.

Proulx, a writer with extraordinary powers of observation and compassion, here turns her lens on herself. We understand how she came to be living in a house surrounded by wilderness, with shelves for thousands of books and long worktables on which to heap manuscripts, research materials and maps, and how she came to be one of the great American writers of her time. Bird Cloud is magnificent.

Review:

"The Pulitzer Prize winner and author of 'Brokeback Mountain' portrays her flawed paradise in the majestic, hardscrabble West in this vibrant memoir. Proulx bought a 640-acre nature preserve by the North Platte River in Wyoming and started building her dream house, a project that took years and went hundreds of thousands of dollars over budget. In her bustling account, Proulx salivates over the prospect of a Japanese soak tub, polished concrete floor, solar panels, and luxe furnishings that often turn into pricey engineering fiascoes. The meticulous master builders she dubs the James Gang are the book's heroes. Though the house never quite lives up to its promise, it does inspire the author's engrossing natural history of the locale. Proulx drives cattle off of the overgrazed terrain; finds stone arrowheads; recounts the lore of the Indians, ranchers, and foppish big-game hunters who contested the land; and documents the antics of the eagles, magpies, mountain lions, and other critters who tolerate her presence. Like her fiction, Proulx's memoir flows from a memorable landscape where 'the sagebrush seems nearly black and beaten low by the ceaseless wind'; the result is a fine evocation of place that becomes a meditation on the importance of a home, however harsh and evanescent. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Review:

"A low-key, pleasing account of finding home...by an accomplished storyteller." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"With a scientist's exactitude, an artist's attunement to beauty, and a storyteller's enchantment, Proulx takes us through the building of a home, intimacy with place, and reclamation of the past." Booklist (starred review)

Review:

"When reality confronts dream and one must notice the rocks, stones, sticks, and bones of everyday life, when Proulx relates the history, prehistory, and natural history of the land, that's when this memoir takes wing upon the Wyoming wind. Recommended for all builders of the Western dream." Library Journal

Review:

"Bird Cloud is part personal memoir, part construction adventure, part diary about noble animals, but all of it comes together like the ingredients of a glorious meal. The reader is lucky to be invited to her table." The San Francisco Chronicle

Synopsis:

Part autobiography, part natural history, Bird Cloud is the glorious story of Annie Proulx's piece of the Wyoming landscape and her home there.

Synopsis:

In her first work of nonfiction in more than 20 years — part family history, part naturalist's journal — Proulx delivers a vivid chronicle of building a house on a spectacularly beautiful piece of land in Wyoming.

Synopsis:

“Bird Cloud” is the name Annie Proulx gave to 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie and four-hundred-foot cliffs plunging down to the North Platte River. On the day she first visited, a cloud in the shape of a bird hung in the evening sky. Proulx also saw pelicans, bald eagles, golden eagles, great blue herons, ravens, scores of bluebirds, harriers, kestrels, elk, deer and a dozen antelope. She fell in love with the land, then owned by the Nature Conservancy, and she knew what she wanted to build on it—a house in harmony with her work, her appetites and her character, a library surrounded by bedrooms and a kitchen.

Proulx’s first work of nonfiction in more than twenty years, Bird Cloud is the story of designing and constructing that house—with its solar panels, Japanese soak tub, concrete floor and elk horn handles on kitchen cabinets. It is also an enthralling natural history and archaeology of the region—inhabited for millennia by Ute, Arapaho and Shoshone Indians— and a family history, going back to nineteenth-century Mississippi riverboat captains and Canadian settlers.

Proulx, a writer with extraordinary powers of observation and compassion, here turns her lens on herself. We understand how she came to be living in a house surrounded by wilderness, with shelves for thousands of books and long worktables on which to heap manuscripts, research materials and maps, and how she came to be one of the great American writers of her time. Bird Cloud is magnificent.

About the Author

Annie Proulx is the author of eight books, including the novel The Shipping News and the story collection Close Range. Her many honors include a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award, the Irish Times International Fiction Prize, and a PEN/Faulkner award. Her story "Brokeback Mountain," which originally appeared in The New Yorker, was made into an Academy Award-winning film. Her most recent book is Fine Just the Way It Is. She lives in Wyoming.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Chris Roberts, June 1, 2011 (view all comments by Chris Roberts)
A House is Not a House, Not a Home

A pristine acreage, many acreages has been forced upon its very nature, its verity, a project authored by a vain, nonsensical and seemingly absent-minded and paradoxically minutiae driven writer, Annie Proulx. It is a wind wasted assemblage of paper fathered by the forests that ring our odd writer out. Thoreau was unable to do it and here is a point of reference:

From my: "The Rogue Henry David Thoreau

Excerpt: What sort of evil madman goes to the American woods and builds himself an English cabin that is made out in plaster and shingles? It goes against the very grain (pun intended) of the all-American, throw-it-up, log cabin which is entirely more conducive to the sounds and smells of nature pouring through its ill-fitted logs. How quaint this English cabin, wrong on so many levels. Perhaps our man Thoreau was an English spy, plotting to overthrow the Stars and Bars with his army of muskrats, turtles and butterflies.

Thoreau eventually got it, Annie Proulx didn't and still doesn't. A failed project is destined to fail again unless you admit it, woman-up. You'll always have "The Shipping News" right?
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780743288804
Author:
Proulx, Annie
Publisher:
Scribner Book Company
Subject:
General
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Environmental Conservation & Protection - General
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Biography - General
Publication Date:
20110131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

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Related Subjects


Biography » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Reference
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment

Bird Cloud: A Memoir Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.50 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9780743288804 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Annie Proulx's love of research transforms this tale of home-building into a chronicle of its Wyoming locale — the wildlife, weather, Native American history, and present-day ranchers. Seasoned with stories from Proulx's own French Canadian roots, Bird Cloud is a fascinating book.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The Pulitzer Prize winner and author of 'Brokeback Mountain' portrays her flawed paradise in the majestic, hardscrabble West in this vibrant memoir. Proulx bought a 640-acre nature preserve by the North Platte River in Wyoming and started building her dream house, a project that took years and went hundreds of thousands of dollars over budget. In her bustling account, Proulx salivates over the prospect of a Japanese soak tub, polished concrete floor, solar panels, and luxe furnishings that often turn into pricey engineering fiascoes. The meticulous master builders she dubs the James Gang are the book's heroes. Though the house never quite lives up to its promise, it does inspire the author's engrossing natural history of the locale. Proulx drives cattle off of the overgrazed terrain; finds stone arrowheads; recounts the lore of the Indians, ranchers, and foppish big-game hunters who contested the land; and documents the antics of the eagles, magpies, mountain lions, and other critters who tolerate her presence. Like her fiction, Proulx's memoir flows from a memorable landscape where 'the sagebrush seems nearly black and beaten low by the ceaseless wind'; the result is a fine evocation of place that becomes a meditation on the importance of a home, however harsh and evanescent. (Jan.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review" by , "A low-key, pleasing account of finding home...by an accomplished storyteller."
"Review" by , "With a scientist's exactitude, an artist's attunement to beauty, and a storyteller's enchantment, Proulx takes us through the building of a home, intimacy with place, and reclamation of the past."
"Review" by , "When reality confronts dream and one must notice the rocks, stones, sticks, and bones of everyday life, when Proulx relates the history, prehistory, and natural history of the land, that's when this memoir takes wing upon the Wyoming wind. Recommended for all builders of the Western dream."
"Review" by , "Bird Cloud is part personal memoir, part construction adventure, part diary about noble animals, but all of it comes together like the ingredients of a glorious meal. The reader is lucky to be invited to her table."
"Synopsis" by , Part autobiography, part natural history, Bird Cloud is the glorious story of Annie Proulx's piece of the Wyoming landscape and her home there.
"Synopsis" by , In her first work of nonfiction in more than 20 years — part family history, part naturalist's journal — Proulx delivers a vivid chronicle of building a house on a spectacularly beautiful piece of land in Wyoming.
"Synopsis" by , “Bird Cloud” is the name Annie Proulx gave to 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie and four-hundred-foot cliffs plunging down to the North Platte River. On the day she first visited, a cloud in the shape of a bird hung in the evening sky. Proulx also saw pelicans, bald eagles, golden eagles, great blue herons, ravens, scores of bluebirds, harriers, kestrels, elk, deer and a dozen antelope. She fell in love with the land, then owned by the Nature Conservancy, and she knew what she wanted to build on it—a house in harmony with her work, her appetites and her character, a library surrounded by bedrooms and a kitchen.

Proulx’s first work of nonfiction in more than twenty years, Bird Cloud is the story of designing and constructing that house—with its solar panels, Japanese soak tub, concrete floor and elk horn handles on kitchen cabinets. It is also an enthralling natural history and archaeology of the region—inhabited for millennia by Ute, Arapaho and Shoshone Indians— and a family history, going back to nineteenth-century Mississippi riverboat captains and Canadian settlers.

Proulx, a writer with extraordinary powers of observation and compassion, here turns her lens on herself. We understand how she came to be living in a house surrounded by wilderness, with shelves for thousands of books and long worktables on which to heap manuscripts, research materials and maps, and how she came to be one of the great American writers of her time. Bird Cloud is magnificent.

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