Master your Minecraft
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Best Books of the Year | December 7, 2014

    Gigi Little: IMG Best Kids' Books of 2014



    No, I'm sorry, it's impossible. The best kids' books of 2014? The best? Can't do it. There have been entirely too many exceptional examples of the... Continue »
    1. $11.87 Sale Board Book add to wish list

      Countablock

      Christopher Franceschelli and Peskimo 9781419713743

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$3.50
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton WREL- AMISH/MENNONITE/HUTTERITE

Amish Grace: How Forgiveness Transcended Tragedy

by

Amish Grace: How Forgiveness Transcended Tragedy Cover

ISBN13: 9780787997618
ISBN10: 0787997617
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $3.50!

 

Review-A-Day

"The writing in Amish Grace is smooth and engaging, and the stories, anecdotes, and quotes make the text sing. The exploration of Amish faith and culture is done in such a way as to make it come alive on the page; the reader doesn't have to worry about dry and turgid recitation of facts and formulae, or soulless academic prose. For the discerning and skeptical reader, no stone is left unturned..." Chris Faatz, Powells.com (read the entire Powells.com review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On Monday morning, October 2, 2006, a gunman entered a one-room Amish school in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania. In front of twenty-five horrified pupils, thirty-two-year-old Charles Roberts ordered the boys and the teacher to leave. After tying the legs of the ten remaining girls, Roberts prepared to shoot them execution with an automatic rifle and four hundred rounds of ammunition that he brought for the task. The oldest hostage, a thirteen-year-old, begged Roberts to "shoot me first and let the little ones go." Refusing her offer, he opened fire on all of them, killing five and leaving the others critically wounded. He then shot himself as police stormed the building. His motivation? "I'm angry at God for taking my little daughter," he told the children before the massacre.

The story captured the attention of broadcast and print media in the United States and around the world. By Tuesday morning some fifty television crews had clogged the small village of Nickel Mines, staying for five days until the killer and the killed were buried. The blood was barely dry on the schoolhouse floor when Amish parents brought words of forgiveness to the family of the one who had slain their children.

The outside world was incredulous that such forgiveness could be offered so quickly for such a heinous crime. Of the hundreds of media queries that the authors received about the shooting, questions about forgiveness rose to the top. Forgiveness, in fact, eclipsed the tragic story, trumping the violence and arresting the world's attention.

Within a week of the murders, Amish forgiveness was a central theme in more than 2,400 news stories around the world. The Washington Post, the New York Times, USA Today, Newsweek, NBC Nightly News, CBS Morning News, Larry King Live, Fox News, Oprah, and dozens of other media outlets heralded the forgiving Amish. From the Khaleej Times (United Arab Emirates) to Australian television, international media were opining on Amish forgiveness. Three weeks after the shooting, "Amish forgiveness" had appeared in 2,900 news stories worldwide and on 534,000 web sites.

Fresh from the funerals where they had buried their own children, grieving Amish families accounted for half of the seventy-five people who attended the killer's burial. Roberts' widow was deeply moved by their presence as Amish families greeted her and her three children. The forgiveness went beyond talk and graveside presence: the Amish also supported a fund for the shooter's family.

Amish Grace explores the many questions this story raises about the religious beliefs and habits that led the Amish to forgive so quickly. It looks at the ties between forgiveness and membership in a cloistered communal society and ask if Amish practices parallel or diverge from other religious and secular notions of forgiveness. It will also address the matter of why forgiveness became news. "All the religions teach it," mused an observer, "but no one does it like the Amish." Regardless of the cultural seedbed that nourished this story, the surprising act of Amish forgiveness begs for a deeper exploration. How could the Amish do this? What did this act mean to them? And how might their witness prove useful to the rest of us?

Review:

"'When a gunman killed five Amish children and injured five others last fall in a Nickel Mines, Pa., schoolhouse, media attention rapidly turned from the tragic events to the extraordinary forgiveness demonstrated by the Amish community. The authors, who teach at small colleges with Anabaptist roots and have published books on the Amish, were contacted repeatedly by the media after the shootings to interpret this subculture. In response to the questions 'why — and how — did they forgive?' Kraybill and his colleagues present a compelling study of 'Amish grace.' After describing the heartbreaking attack and its aftermath, the authors establish that forgiveness is embedded in Amish society through five centuries of Anabaptist tradition, and grounded in the firm belief that forgiveness is required by the New Testament. The community's acts of forgiveness were not isolated decisions by saintly individuals but hard-won 'countercultural' practices supported by all aspects of Amish life. Common objections to Amish forgiveness are addressed in a chapter entitled, 'What About Shunning?' The authors carefully distinguish between forgiveness, pardon and reconciliation, as well as analyzethe complexities of mainstream America's response and the extent to which the Amish example can be applied elsewhere. This intelligent, compassionate and hopeful book is a welcome addition to the growing literature on forgiveness. (Sept. 21)' Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)"

Synopsis:

Praise for Amish Grace

"A story our polarized country needs to hear: It is still grace that saves."

Bill Moyers, Public Affairs Television

"Amish Grace tells a story of forgiveness informed by deep faith, rooted in a rich history, and practiced in real life. In an American society that often resorts to revenge, it is a powerful example of the better way taught by Jesus."

Jim Wallis, author, God's Politics; president, Sojourners/Call to Renewal

"In a world where repaying evil with evil is almost second nature, the Amish remind us there's a better way. In plain and beautiful prose, Amish Grace recounts the Amish witness and connects it to the heart of their spirituality."

Sister Helen Prejean, author, Dead Man Walking

"An inside look at a series of events that showed the world what Christ-like forgiveness is all about ? a story of the love of God lived out in the face of tragedy."

Tony Campolo, Eastern University

"Amish Grace dissects the deep-rooted pattern of Amish forgiveness and grace that, after the Nickel Mines tragedy, caused the world to gasp."

Philip Yancey, author, What's So Amazing About Grace

"Covers the subject in a superb way. It gave me a private tutorial in Amish culture and religion ? on their unique view of life, death, and forgiveness."

Fred Luskin, author, Forgive for Good; director, Stanford Forgiveness Projects

"A remarkable book about the good but imperfect Amish, who individually and collectively consistently try to live Jesus' example of love – for one another and for the enemy."

Dr. Carol Rittner, distinguished professor of holocaust and genocide studies, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

"A casebook on forgiveness valuable for ALL Christians. It drills beneath the theory to their practice and even deeper to the instructions of Jesus."

Dr. Julia Upton, provost, St. John's University

Synopsis:

"A beautiful testimony to the power and the joy of Amish grace—grace under fire, grace that wrenches something beautiful out of the jaws of tragedy. Amish Grace is also a challenge to the rest of us to more fully embody the teachings of Jesus."

—William H. Willimon, Bishop, the North Alabama Conference of the United Methodist Church

The remarkable response of the Amish community to the horrific shooting of ten schoolgirls at Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, in October 2006 stunned the larger world. Amish Grace tells the incredible story of this community's reaction to this senseless shooting and explores its profoundly countercultural practice of forgiveness.

Outsiders often hold a stereotypical view of the Amish as a stubbornly backwards people—a view rooted in the picturesque images of buggies, beards, and bonnets. But there is much more to know about the Amish as a people, as we discovered after the Nickel Mines incident. The community's collective and radical act of forgiveness—the loving and compassionate response to the shooter and his family—gives us insights into who the Amish are and how they live their faith.

Amish Grace explores the many questions the story raises about the religious beliefs that led the Amish to forgive so quickly. In a world where religion spawns so much violence and vengeance, the surprising act of Amish forgiveness begs for deeper consideration.

About the Author

Donald B. Kraybill, Ph.D., (Elizabethtown, PA) is senior fellow at the Young Center of Elizabethtown College. Among his many publications, he has authored, coauthored or edited six books on the Amish. The Young Center, where he is based, fielded hundreds of media calls in the week following the shooting. Kraybill's commentary on the Nickel Mines killing was featured in dozens of broadcast and print media sources including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian (London), The Australian, Newsweek, NBC, ABC, CBS, CNN, NPR, BBC Radio, to name a few.

Steven M. Nolt, Ph.D., (Goshen, IN) is associate professor of history at Goshen College. He has written on the history of the Amish and their culture. In the wake of the Nickel Mines tragedy, Nolt fielded inquiries from dozens of reporters, including those of USA Today, MSNBC, CBC World News, Newsweek.com, Education Week, British Independent Television, and O Estado de S. Paulo (Brazil).

David L. Weaver-Zercher, Ph.D., (Grantham, PA) is associate professor of American religious history at Messiah College. He is the author or editor of numerous books on the Amish. In the aftermath of the Nickel Mines shooting, Weaver-Zercher was contacted by more than forty media outlets including the New York Times, the Washington Post, Newsweek, MSNBC, BBC Radio, and NPR.

Table of Contents

Preface.

PART ONE.
Chapter 1: The Nickel Mines Amish.
Chapter 2: The Shooting.
Chapter 3: The Aftermath.
Chapter 4: The Surprise.
Chapter 5: The Reactions.

PART TWO.
Chapter 6: The Habit of Forgiveness.
Chapter 7: The Roots of Forgiveness.
Chapter 8: The Spirituality of Forgiveness.
Chapter 9: The Practice of Forgiveness

PART THREE.
Chapter 10: Forgiveness at Nickel Mines.
Chapter 11: What About Shunning?
Chapter 12: Grief, Providence, and Justice.
Chapter 13: Amish Grace and the Rest of Us.

Afterword.
Acknowledgments.
Appendix: The Amish of North America.
Endnotes.
Resources for Further reading.
The Authors.
Index.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Deborah Fochler, December 15, 2007 (view all comments by Deborah Fochler)
This book is especially appropriate for this season. The fact that it actually happened is even more heart wrenching. If this was fiction it would be hard to comprehend but it is not fiction - it is the truth - pure and unvarnished, not made pretty or cleaned up. Just there in plain words and will leave your heart aching for these families. But, they have managed to forgive a person who devastated their community and their families. We have much to learn from these people and this book. Could you forgive the man who killed your child? The fact that they forgave him doesnt lessen their losses - they lost their children in a place where they should have been safe. In a school. Many many questions came to my mind as I read this book. How safe are any of us? How would I react? Could I forgive?
While the subject of this book is horrific - the end result is heartlifting and heartwarming and left me with a much different outlook for the Amish community. This book is hard to put down. I would highly recommend it.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(8 of 14 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780787997618
Subtitle:
How Forgiveness Transcended Tragedy
Author:
Kraybill, Donald B
Author:
Kraybill, Donald B.
Author:
Nolt, Steven M.
Author:
Weaver-Zercher, David L.
Publisher:
Jossey-Bass
Subject:
Doctrines
Subject:
Amish
Subject:
Christianity - History - General
Subject:
Murder - General
Subject:
Christianity - Amish
Subject:
Church History
Subject:
Forgiveness of sin
Subject:
Amish -- Doctrines.
Subject:
History
Subject:
Religion, Issues & Current Affairs
Copyright:
Publication Date:
September 2007
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.33x6.29x.95 in. .97 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Rumspringa: To Be or Not to Be Amish
    Used Trade Paper $3.50
  2. History of Christianity Used Trade Paper $7.50
  3. The Life You Save May Be Your Own:... Used Trade Paper $8.50
  4. The Barn at the End of the World:... Used Trade Paper $7.95
  5. Cost of Discipleship Used Mass Market $4.50

Related Subjects

Religion » Christianity » Amish, Mennonite, and Hutterite
Religion » Christianity » Miscellaneous Denominations
Religion » Western Religions » Denominations

Amish Grace: How Forgiveness Transcended Tragedy Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.50 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Jossey-Bass - English 9780787997618 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'When a gunman killed five Amish children and injured five others last fall in a Nickel Mines, Pa., schoolhouse, media attention rapidly turned from the tragic events to the extraordinary forgiveness demonstrated by the Amish community. The authors, who teach at small colleges with Anabaptist roots and have published books on the Amish, were contacted repeatedly by the media after the shootings to interpret this subculture. In response to the questions 'why — and how — did they forgive?' Kraybill and his colleagues present a compelling study of 'Amish grace.' After describing the heartbreaking attack and its aftermath, the authors establish that forgiveness is embedded in Amish society through five centuries of Anabaptist tradition, and grounded in the firm belief that forgiveness is required by the New Testament. The community's acts of forgiveness were not isolated decisions by saintly individuals but hard-won 'countercultural' practices supported by all aspects of Amish life. Common objections to Amish forgiveness are addressed in a chapter entitled, 'What About Shunning?' The authors carefully distinguish between forgiveness, pardon and reconciliation, as well as analyzethe complexities of mainstream America's response and the extent to which the Amish example can be applied elsewhere. This intelligent, compassionate and hopeful book is a welcome addition to the growing literature on forgiveness. (Sept. 21)' Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)"
"Review A Day" by , "The writing in Amish Grace is smooth and engaging, and the stories, anecdotes, and quotes make the text sing. The exploration of Amish faith and culture is done in such a way as to make it come alive on the page; the reader doesn't have to worry about dry and turgid recitation of facts and formulae, or soulless academic prose. For the discerning and skeptical reader, no stone is left unturned..." (read the entire Powells.com review)
"Synopsis" by , Praise for Amish Grace

"A story our polarized country needs to hear: It is still grace that saves."

Bill Moyers, Public Affairs Television

"Amish Grace tells a story of forgiveness informed by deep faith, rooted in a rich history, and practiced in real life. In an American society that often resorts to revenge, it is a powerful example of the better way taught by Jesus."

Jim Wallis, author, God's Politics; president, Sojourners/Call to Renewal

"In a world where repaying evil with evil is almost second nature, the Amish remind us there's a better way. In plain and beautiful prose, Amish Grace recounts the Amish witness and connects it to the heart of their spirituality."

Sister Helen Prejean, author, Dead Man Walking

"An inside look at a series of events that showed the world what Christ-like forgiveness is all about ? a story of the love of God lived out in the face of tragedy."

Tony Campolo, Eastern University

"Amish Grace dissects the deep-rooted pattern of Amish forgiveness and grace that, after the Nickel Mines tragedy, caused the world to gasp."

Philip Yancey, author, What's So Amazing About Grace

"Covers the subject in a superb way. It gave me a private tutorial in Amish culture and religion ? on their unique view of life, death, and forgiveness."

Fred Luskin, author, Forgive for Good; director, Stanford Forgiveness Projects

"A remarkable book about the good but imperfect Amish, who individually and collectively consistently try to live Jesus' example of love – for one another and for the enemy."

Dr. Carol Rittner, distinguished professor of holocaust and genocide studies, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

"A casebook on forgiveness valuable for ALL Christians. It drills beneath the theory to their practice and even deeper to the instructions of Jesus."

Dr. Julia Upton, provost, St. John's University

"Synopsis" by , "A beautiful testimony to the power and the joy of Amish grace—grace under fire, grace that wrenches something beautiful out of the jaws of tragedy. Amish Grace is also a challenge to the rest of us to more fully embody the teachings of Jesus."

—William H. Willimon, Bishop, the North Alabama Conference of the United Methodist Church

The remarkable response of the Amish community to the horrific shooting of ten schoolgirls at Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania, in October 2006 stunned the larger world. Amish Grace tells the incredible story of this community's reaction to this senseless shooting and explores its profoundly countercultural practice of forgiveness.

Outsiders often hold a stereotypical view of the Amish as a stubbornly backwards people—a view rooted in the picturesque images of buggies, beards, and bonnets. But there is much more to know about the Amish as a people, as we discovered after the Nickel Mines incident. The community's collective and radical act of forgiveness—the loving and compassionate response to the shooter and his family—gives us insights into who the Amish are and how they live their faith.

Amish Grace explores the many questions the story raises about the religious beliefs that led the Amish to forgive so quickly. In a world where religion spawns so much violence and vengeance, the surprising act of Amish forgiveness begs for deeper consideration.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.