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The Judgment of Paris

by

The Judgment of Paris Cover

 

Staff Pick

With consummate skill, Ross King resurrects the rivalry between the French art establishment and the artists who gave birth to the Impressionist movement. Focusing on the decade between two famous exhibitions, the shocking Salon des Refusés in 1863 and the first Impressionist showing in 1874, King centers his story on two artistic opposites, Ernest Meissonier and Edouard Manet. Filled with detail and insight, the movement brilliantly unfolds as do the culture and artists that populate its history.
Recommended by Chandler, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

From the acclaimed author of the bestsellers Brunelleschi's Dome and Michelangelo & the Pope's Ceiling.

While the Civil War raged in America, another very different revolution was beginning to take shape across the Atlantic, in the studios of Paris: The artists who would make Impressionism the most popular art form in history were showing their first paintings amidst scorn and derision from the French artistic establishment. Indeed, no artistic movement has ever been, at its inception, quite so controversial. The drama of its birth, played out on canvas, would at times resemble a battlefield; and, as Ross King reveals, it would reorder both history and culture, and resonate around the world.

The Judgment of Paris chronicles the dramatic decade between two famous exhibitions: the scandalous Salon des Refusés in 1863, and the first Impressionist showing in 1874, set against the rise and dramatic fall of Napoleon III and the Second Empire, after the Franco-Prussian War. A tale of many artists, it revolves around the lives of two, described as "the two poles of art" — Ernest Meissonier, the most famous and successful painter of the 19th century, hailed for his precision and devotion to history; and Edouard Manet, reviled in his time, who nonetheless heralded the most radical change in the history of art since the Renaissance. Out of the fascinating story of their parallel lives, illuminated by their legendary supporters and critics?Zola, Delacroix, Courbet, Baudelaire, Whistler, Monet, Hugo, Degas, and many more — Ross King shows that their contest was not just about Art, it was about how to see the world. With a novelist's skill and the perception of an historian, King recalls a seminal period when artistic expression had the power to electrify and divide a nation.

Review:

"NBCC finalist King (Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling) presents an engrossing account of the years from 1863 — when paintings denied entry into the French Academy's yearly Salon were shown at the Salon des Refuss — to 1874, the date of the first Impressionist exhibition. To dramatize the conflict between academicians and innovators during these years, he follows the careers of two formidable, and very different, artists: Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier, a conservative painter celebrated for detailed historical subjects, and douard Manet, whose painting Le Djeuner sur l'herbe caused an uproar at the Salon des Refuss. Many other artists of the day, among them Courbet, Degas, Morisot, Monet and Czanne, are included in King's compelling narrative, and the story is further enhanced by the author's vivid portrayal of artistic life in Paris during a turbulent era that saw the siege of the city by the Prussians and the fall of Napoleon III. An epilogue underscores the irony of the tale: after his death, Meissonier quickly fell from favor, while Manet, whose paintings were once judged scandalous, was recognized as a great artist who set the stage for Impressionism and the future of painting. Illus. not seen by PW." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"In 1865, no painter in France was more reviled than the 33-year-old Edouard Manet. The critics compared his brushwork to the action of a floor mop and judged his infamous 'Le Dejeuner sur l'herbe,' which features a naked woman picnicking with two clothed dandies, 'a shameful open sore.' The public laughed at anything he hung on the wall. Accustomed to such abuse, he was understandably perplexed by... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"A fluid, engaging account of how the conflicting careers of two French painters... reveal the slow emergence of Impressionism and its new view of painting and the world.... [A]n exciting chronicle about political and cultural change." Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

Review:

"In its broad outlines, a familiar story, but Mr. King... tells it with tremendous energy and skill. It is hard to imagine a more inviting account of the artistic civil war that raged around the Paris Salons of the 1860's and 70's, or of the outsize personalities who transformed the way the world looked at painting." William Grimes, New York Times Book Review.

Book News Annotation:

Of course you know the art of Meissonier. He was one of the most successful artists in the 19th century, a master of realism and detail.... You say you do not remember him? So do you remember Manet? King focuses on the turmoil between the Salon des Refuss of 1863 and the first Impressionist showing of 1874, a period which began with the elegant Napoleon III and ended without him after his fall in the Franco-Prussian War. Manet and Meissonier may have been marginally interested in the fate of the third Napoleon, but they were definitely interested in each other, their rivalry in how they saw their world, and how the ranks of their friends and enemies grew and changed. King also provides color pictures of the art in question, probably one of the few times you will see the work of Meissonier outside of a very quiet corner of a museum. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

While the Civil War raged in America, another revolution took shape across the Atlantic, in the studios of Paris: The artists who would make Impressionism the most popular art form in history were showing their first paintings amidst scorn and derision from the French artistic establishment. Indeed, no artistic movement has ever been quite so controversial. The drama of its birth, played out on canvas and against the backdrop of the Franco-Prussian War and the Commune, would at times resemble a battlefield; and as Ross King reveals, it would reorder both history and culture, and resonate around the world.

Synopsis:

While the Civil War raged in America, another very different revolution was beginning to take shape across the Atlantic, in the studios of Paris: The artists who would make Impressionism the most popular art form in history were showing their first paintings amidst scorn and derision from the French artistic establishment. Indeed, no artistic movement has ever been, at its inception, quite so controversial. The drama of its birth, played out on canvas, would at times resemble a battlefield; and, as Ross King reveals, Impressionism would reorder both history and culture as it resonated around the world.

The Judgment of Paris chronicles the dramatic decade between two famous exhibitions--the scandalous Salon des Refuses in 1863 and the first Impressionist showing in 1874--set against the rise and dramatic fall of Napoleon III and the Second Empire after the Franco-Prussian War. A tale of many artists, it revolves around the lives of two, described as "the two poles of art"--Ernest Meissonier, the most famous and successful painter of the 19th century, hailed for his precision and devotion to history; and Edouard Manet, reviled in his time, who nonetheless heralded the most radical change in the history of art since the Renaissance. Out of the fascinating story of their parallel lives, illuminated by their legendary supporters and critics--Zola, Delacroix, Courbet, Baudelaire, Whistler, Monet, Hugo, Degas, and many more--Ross King shows that their contest was not just about Art, it was about competing visions of a rapidly changing world.

With a novelist's skill and the insight of an historian, King recalls a seminal period when Paris was the artistic center of the world, and a revolutionary movement had the power to electrify and divide a nation.

About the Author

Born and raised in Canada, Ross King has lived in England since 1992. In 2002?03, two books of his were published in the United States, Domino, about the world of masquerades and opera in 18th century London and the New York Times bestselling Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling.

Nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award in 2003 in the category of critisicm, in Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling King tells the story of the four years — 1508-1512. — Michelangelo spent painting the ceiling of the newly restored Sistine chapel. In this extraordinary book, he presents a magnificent tapestry of day-to-day life of the ingenious Sistine scaffolding and outside in the upheaval of early 16th century Rome.

King's highly acclaimed Brunelleschi's Dome: How a Renaissance Genius Reinvented Architecture, was an instant hit in the U.S., landing on the New York Times, Boston Globe and San Francisco Chronicle bestseller lists and becoming a handselling favorite among booksellers. Brunelleschi's Dome was chosen "The 2000 Book Sense Nonfiction Book of the Year" and a Book Sense 76 top ten selection.

Anyone familiar with Ross King's writing knows that he has an astonishing knowledge of European cultural history. He originally planned a career in academia, earning his Ph.D. in English Literature and moving to England to assume a research position at the University of London.

King lives near Oxford, England, in the historic town of Woodstock, the site of Blenheim Palace. He is a devoted cyclist and hikes regularly in both the Pyrenees and the Canadian Rockies.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802714664
Author:
King, Ross
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Subject:
Artists, Architects, Photographers
Subject:
Painting, french
Subject:
Impressionism (art)
Subject:
History - Impressionism
Subject:
General History
Subject:
Impressionism (Art) -- France.
Subject:
Painting, French -- 19th century.
Subject:
Biography-Artists Architects and Photographers
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
The Revolutionary De
Publication Date:
20061128
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
30 bandw, 16 color images
Pages:
464
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Europe General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Impressionism
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Impressionism and Post Impressionism
Biography » Artists, Architects, and Photographers
History and Social Science » Europe » France » Paris

The Judgment of Paris Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$3.95 In Stock
Product details 464 pages MACMILLAN PUBLISHING SERVICES - English 9780802714664 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

With consummate skill, Ross King resurrects the rivalry between the French art establishment and the artists who gave birth to the Impressionist movement. Focusing on the decade between two famous exhibitions, the shocking Salon des Refusés in 1863 and the first Impressionist showing in 1874, King centers his story on two artistic opposites, Ernest Meissonier and Edouard Manet. Filled with detail and insight, the movement brilliantly unfolds as do the culture and artists that populate its history.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "NBCC finalist King (Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling) presents an engrossing account of the years from 1863 — when paintings denied entry into the French Academy's yearly Salon were shown at the Salon des Refuss — to 1874, the date of the first Impressionist exhibition. To dramatize the conflict between academicians and innovators during these years, he follows the careers of two formidable, and very different, artists: Jean-Louis-Ernest Meissonier, a conservative painter celebrated for detailed historical subjects, and douard Manet, whose painting Le Djeuner sur l'herbe caused an uproar at the Salon des Refuss. Many other artists of the day, among them Courbet, Degas, Morisot, Monet and Czanne, are included in King's compelling narrative, and the story is further enhanced by the author's vivid portrayal of artistic life in Paris during a turbulent era that saw the siege of the city by the Prussians and the fall of Napoleon III. An epilogue underscores the irony of the tale: after his death, Meissonier quickly fell from favor, while Manet, whose paintings were once judged scandalous, was recognized as a great artist who set the stage for Impressionism and the future of painting. Illus. not seen by PW." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A fluid, engaging account of how the conflicting careers of two French painters... reveal the slow emergence of Impressionism and its new view of painting and the world.... [A]n exciting chronicle about political and cultural change."
"Review" by , "In its broad outlines, a familiar story, but Mr. King... tells it with tremendous energy and skill. It is hard to imagine a more inviting account of the artistic civil war that raged around the Paris Salons of the 1860's and 70's, or of the outsize personalities who transformed the way the world looked at painting."
"Synopsis" by ,
While the Civil War raged in America, another revolution took shape across the Atlantic, in the studios of Paris: The artists who would make Impressionism the most popular art form in history were showing their first paintings amidst scorn and derision from the French artistic establishment. Indeed, no artistic movement has ever been quite so controversial. The drama of its birth, played out on canvas and against the backdrop of the Franco-Prussian War and the Commune, would at times resemble a battlefield; and as Ross King reveals, it would reorder both history and culture, and resonate around the world.
"Synopsis" by ,
While the Civil War raged in America, another very different revolution was beginning to take shape across the Atlantic, in the studios of Paris: The artists who would make Impressionism the most popular art form in history were showing their first paintings amidst scorn and derision from the French artistic establishment. Indeed, no artistic movement has ever been, at its inception, quite so controversial. The drama of its birth, played out on canvas, would at times resemble a battlefield; and, as Ross King reveals, Impressionism would reorder both history and culture as it resonated around the world.

The Judgment of Paris chronicles the dramatic decade between two famous exhibitions--the scandalous Salon des Refuses in 1863 and the first Impressionist showing in 1874--set against the rise and dramatic fall of Napoleon III and the Second Empire after the Franco-Prussian War. A tale of many artists, it revolves around the lives of two, described as "the two poles of art"--Ernest Meissonier, the most famous and successful painter of the 19th century, hailed for his precision and devotion to history; and Edouard Manet, reviled in his time, who nonetheless heralded the most radical change in the history of art since the Renaissance. Out of the fascinating story of their parallel lives, illuminated by their legendary supporters and critics--Zola, Delacroix, Courbet, Baudelaire, Whistler, Monet, Hugo, Degas, and many more--Ross King shows that their contest was not just about Art, it was about competing visions of a rapidly changing world.

With a novelist's skill and the insight of an historian, King recalls a seminal period when Paris was the artistic center of the world, and a revolutionary movement had the power to electrify and divide a nation.

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