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Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq

by

Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq Cover

ISBN13: 9780805082401
ISBN10: 0805082409
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A fast-paced narrative history of the coups, revolutions, and invasions by which the United States has toppled fourteen foreign governments — not always to its own benefit.

"Regime change" did not begin with the administration of George W. Bush, but has been an integral part of U.S. foreign policy for more than one hundred years. Starting with the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893 and continuing through the Spanish-American War and the Cold War and into our own time, the United States has not hesitated to overthrow governments that stood in the way of its political and economic goals. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 is the latest, though perhaps not the last, example of the dangers inherent in these operations.

In Overthrow, Stephen Kinzer tells the stories of the audacious politicians, spies, military commanders, and business executives who took it upon themselves to depose monarchs, presidents, and prime ministers. He also shows that the U.S. government has often pursued these operations without understanding the countries involved; as a result, many of them have had disastrous long-term consequences.

In a compelling and provocative history that takes readers to fourteen countries, including Cuba, Iran, South Vietnam, Chile, and Iraq, Kinzer surveys modern American history from a new and often surprising perspective.

Review:

"Kinzer has written a detailed, passionate and convincing book....Most important, it helps explain why, outside of Eastern Europe, American pronouncements about spreading democracy and freedom, as repeatedly employed by the Bush administration, are met with widespread incredulity." New York Times

Review:

"To be shocked and awed by history is not a common reading experience. One usually reserves such reactions for edgy fiction, juicy memoirs or newsy exposes....Overthrow is as gripping as any of these." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"The lightning-swift invasion of Iraq and the subsequent slog through a bloody insurrection...haunts this book as yet another lesson unlearned about how much like our former colonial masters we have become." San Antonio Express-News

Review:

"I have a sad suspicion that, with Iraq's seemingly endless toll, Overthrow will likewise become required reading." Washington Post

Review:

"Citizens concerned about foreign affairs must read this book....We deposed fourteen foreign governments in hardly more than a century, some for good reasons, more for bad reasons, with most dubious long-term consequences." Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.

Review:

"Bush has had plenty of company in the past century — presidents who believe that America, as Kinzer tells us, has the right to wage war wherever it deems war necessary." Seymour M. Hersh

Review:

"Stephen Kinzer's book is a jewel....It is a tale of imperialism American-style, usually in the service of corporate interests." Chalmers Johnson

Review:

"If Overthrow sounds like an anti-American rant, it isn't. Kinzer's sources are well footnoted. He makes a thoughtful effort to present all sides." Cleveland Plain Dealer

Review:

"...Overthrow is a timely and important book whose arguments deserve extensive debate....[E]ffectively challenges our historical amnesia...in ways that can only enrich our national political discourse." Chicago Tribune

Synopsis:

A fast-paced narrative history of the coups, revolutions, and invasions by which the United States has toppled fourteen foreign governments?not always to its own benefit.

"Regime change" did not begin with the administration of George W. Bush, but has been an integral part of U.S. foreign policy for more than one hundred years. Starting with the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893 and continuing through the Spanish-American War and the Cold War and into our own time, the United States has not hesitated to overthrow governments that stood in the way of its political and economic goals. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 is the latest, though perhaps not the last, example of the dangers inherent in these operations.

In Overthrow, Stephen Kinzer tells the stories of the audacious politicians, spies, military commanders, and business executives who took it upon themselves to depose monarchs, presidents, and prime ministers. He also shows that the U.S. government has often pursued these operations without understanding the countries involved; as a result, many of them have had disastrous long-term consequences. In a compelling and provocative history that takes readers to fourteen countries, including Cuba, Iran, South Vietnam, Chile, and Iraq, Kinzer surveys modern American history from a new and often surprising perspective.

Synopsis:

Detailed, passionate and convincing . . . with] the pace and grip of a good thriller.--Anatol Lieven, The New York Times Book Review

Regime change did not begin with the administration of George W. Bush, but has been an integral part of U.S. foreign policy for more than one hundred years. Starting with the toppling of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893, the United States has not hesitated to overthrow governments that stood in the way of its political and economic goals. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 is but the latest example of the dangers inherent in these operations.

In Overthrow, Stephen Kinzer tells the stories of the audacious politicians, spies, military commanders, and business executives who took it upon themselves to depose foreign regimes. He details the three eras of America's regime-change century--the imperial era, which brought Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, Nicaragua, and Honduras under America's sway; the cold war era, which employed covert action against Iran, Guatemala, South Vietnam, and Chile; and the invasion era, which saw American troops toppling governments in Grenada, Panama, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

Kinzer explains why the U.S. government has pursued these operations and why so many of them have had disastrous long-term consequences, making Overthrow a cautionary tale that serves as an urgent warning as the United States seeks to define its role in the modern world. Stephen Kinzer is an award-winning foreign correspondent for The New York Times who has reported from more than fifty countries on four continents. He has served as the paper's bureau chief in Turkey, Germany, and Nicaragua. His previous books include All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror; Crescent and Star: Turkey Between Two Worlds; and Blood of Brothers: Life and War in Nicaragua. He is also the co-author of Bitter Fruit: The Untold Story of the American Coup in Guatemala. He lives in Chicago. Regime change did not begin with the administration of George W. Bush, but has been an integral part of U.S. foreign policy for more than one hundred years. Starting with the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893 and continuing through the entire twentieth century and into our own time, the United States has not hesitated to topple governments that stood in the way of its political and economic goals. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 is the latest, though perhaps not the last, example of these high-stakes operations. In Overthrow, Stephen Kinzer tells the stories of the audacious politicians, spies, military commanders, and business executives who took it upon themselves to depose monarchs, presidents, and prime ministers. He recounts how America's long regime-change century began in Hawaii and gained momentum during the Spanish-American War, when Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines fell to American military and political power. Soon afterward, the United States started flexing its muscles in Central America, orchestrating coups that brought down the presidents of Nicaragua and Honduras. Kinzer then shows how the Cold War rivalry with the Soviet Union led American leaders to view all political disputes through the lens of superpower competition. During this period, they arranged covert actions that led to the murder of a South Vietnamese president and the fall of democratic governments in Iran, Guatemala, and Chile. In recent years, invasions have once again become the preferred instrument of regime change, as operations in Grenada, Panama, Afghanistan, and Iraq attest. The United States usually succeeds when it sets out to depose a foreign leader, but Kinzer assesses these operations in the cold light of history and concludes that many of them have actually undermined American security. Overthrow is a cautionary tale that serves as a warning as the United States seeks to define its role in the modern world. Kinzer has written a detailed, passionate and convincing book, several chapters of which have the pace and grip of a good thriller. It should be essential reading for any Americans who wish to understand both their country's historical record in international affairs, and why that record has provoked anger and distrust in much of the world. Most important, it helps explain why, outside of Eastern Europe, American pronouncements about spreading democracy and freedom, as repeatedly employed by the Bush administration, are met with widespread incredulity.--Anatol Lieven, The New York Times Book Review Overthrow is an infuriating recitation of our government's military bullying over the past 110 years--a century of interventions around the world that resulted in the overthrow of 14 governments--in Hawaii, Cuba, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Vietnam, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras, Panama, Chile, Iran, Grenada, Afghanistan, and . . . Iraq.--The Texas ObserverIn this fascinating history, Kinzer explores the reasons for such operations and what they accomplished. The pattern of regime-change operations has followed the arc of U.S. global engagement in the twentieth century . . . Across the cases, which are recounted in lively and colorful detail, Kinzer argues that the motives for regime change have ranged from the prosaic and the pecuniary to the principled and the strategic. But in each case, action was undertaken when foreign governments refused to protect U.S. interests as defined at the moment . . . A useful portrait of the presidents who have influenced the exercise of U.S. power and the interesting judgment that interventions have often succeeded in their immediate goals but failed to advance U.S. interests in the long term.--G. John Ikenberry, Foreign Affairs To be shocked and awed by history is not a common reading experience. One usually reserves such reactions for edgy fiction, juicy memoirs or newsy exposes. Yet Stephen Kinzer's Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change From Hawaii to Iraq is as g

About the Author

Stephen Kinzer is an award-winning foreign correspondent for the New York Times who has reported from more than fifty countries on four continents. He has served as the paper's bureau chief in Turkey, Germany, and Nicaragua. His previous books include All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror; Crescent and Star: Turkey Between Two Worlds; and Blood of Brothers: Life and War in Nicaragua. He is also the co-author of Bitter Fruit: The Untold Story of the American Coup in Guatemala. He lives in Chicago.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

John Curtin, September 25, 2011 (view all comments by John Curtin)
I put this book next to the Howard Zinn classic , a peoples history , not as great but still a great book ..I only wish a few of my friends would read it ..
The common American saying " why do they hate us " might be answered in this book
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
nehark, January 1, 2010 (view all comments by nehark)
This book, taken with Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States," should be required high school reading. Anyone who has never had a history or civics lesson outside of our disappointing educational system owes himself this read--especially if he is wondering how the heck we got where we are right now as a nation. It didn't just happen overnight.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
jpmaher, January 4, 2009 (view all comments by jpmaher)
Kinzer's book is a waste of time in one respect: he reveals all about things every informed person already knew about regime change -- from Hawaii to Iraq. By omission, however, Kinzer's OVERTHROW is a COVER-UP of America's imperial war in the Balkans. Kinzer covered the 1990s war there, but he never mentions Yugoslavia in OVERTHROW. Didn't a mendacious State Department through a compliant press, as per Kinzer's correct scenario, create bogey-men there? That war sold a lot of newspapers for the NY Times in unison with the rest of "the free press". Hearst would be envious of Kinzer.
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(4 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780805082401
Author:
Kinzer, Stephen
Publisher:
Times Books
Subject:
Military - United States
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Political History
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
US History-General
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20070231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 16-pg. insert
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
8.31 x 5.47 x 0.735 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » US Military » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » US History » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » US History » General

Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.99 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Times Books - English 9780805082401 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Kinzer has written a detailed, passionate and convincing book....Most important, it helps explain why, outside of Eastern Europe, American pronouncements about spreading democracy and freedom, as repeatedly employed by the Bush administration, are met with widespread incredulity."
"Review" by , "To be shocked and awed by history is not a common reading experience. One usually reserves such reactions for edgy fiction, juicy memoirs or newsy exposes....Overthrow is as gripping as any of these."
"Review" by , "The lightning-swift invasion of Iraq and the subsequent slog through a bloody insurrection...haunts this book as yet another lesson unlearned about how much like our former colonial masters we have become."
"Review" by , "I have a sad suspicion that, with Iraq's seemingly endless toll, Overthrow will likewise become required reading."
"Review" by , "Citizens concerned about foreign affairs must read this book....We deposed fourteen foreign governments in hardly more than a century, some for good reasons, more for bad reasons, with most dubious long-term consequences."
"Review" by , "Bush has had plenty of company in the past century — presidents who believe that America, as Kinzer tells us, has the right to wage war wherever it deems war necessary."
"Review" by , "Stephen Kinzer's book is a jewel....It is a tale of imperialism American-style, usually in the service of corporate interests."
"Review" by , "If Overthrow sounds like an anti-American rant, it isn't. Kinzer's sources are well footnoted. He makes a thoughtful effort to present all sides."
"Review" by , "...Overthrow is a timely and important book whose arguments deserve extensive debate....[E]ffectively challenges our historical amnesia...in ways that can only enrich our national political discourse."
"Synopsis" by , A fast-paced narrative history of the coups, revolutions, and invasions by which the United States has toppled fourteen foreign governments?not always to its own benefit.

"Regime change" did not begin with the administration of George W. Bush, but has been an integral part of U.S. foreign policy for more than one hundred years. Starting with the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893 and continuing through the Spanish-American War and the Cold War and into our own time, the United States has not hesitated to overthrow governments that stood in the way of its political and economic goals. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 is the latest, though perhaps not the last, example of the dangers inherent in these operations.

In Overthrow, Stephen Kinzer tells the stories of the audacious politicians, spies, military commanders, and business executives who took it upon themselves to depose monarchs, presidents, and prime ministers. He also shows that the U.S. government has often pursued these operations without understanding the countries involved; as a result, many of them have had disastrous long-term consequences. In a compelling and provocative history that takes readers to fourteen countries, including Cuba, Iran, South Vietnam, Chile, and Iraq, Kinzer surveys modern American history from a new and often surprising perspective.

"Synopsis" by , Detailed, passionate and convincing . . . with] the pace and grip of a good thriller.--Anatol Lieven, The New York Times Book Review

Regime change did not begin with the administration of George W. Bush, but has been an integral part of U.S. foreign policy for more than one hundred years. Starting with the toppling of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893, the United States has not hesitated to overthrow governments that stood in the way of its political and economic goals. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 is but the latest example of the dangers inherent in these operations.

In Overthrow, Stephen Kinzer tells the stories of the audacious politicians, spies, military commanders, and business executives who took it upon themselves to depose foreign regimes. He details the three eras of America's regime-change century--the imperial era, which brought Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, Nicaragua, and Honduras under America's sway; the cold war era, which employed covert action against Iran, Guatemala, South Vietnam, and Chile; and the invasion era, which saw American troops toppling governments in Grenada, Panama, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

Kinzer explains why the U.S. government has pursued these operations and why so many of them have had disastrous long-term consequences, making Overthrow a cautionary tale that serves as an urgent warning as the United States seeks to define its role in the modern world. Stephen Kinzer is an award-winning foreign correspondent for The New York Times who has reported from more than fifty countries on four continents. He has served as the paper's bureau chief in Turkey, Germany, and Nicaragua. His previous books include All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror; Crescent and Star: Turkey Between Two Worlds; and Blood of Brothers: Life and War in Nicaragua. He is also the co-author of Bitter Fruit: The Untold Story of the American Coup in Guatemala. He lives in Chicago. Regime change did not begin with the administration of George W. Bush, but has been an integral part of U.S. foreign policy for more than one hundred years. Starting with the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893 and continuing through the entire twentieth century and into our own time, the United States has not hesitated to topple governments that stood in the way of its political and economic goals. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 is the latest, though perhaps not the last, example of these high-stakes operations. In Overthrow, Stephen Kinzer tells the stories of the audacious politicians, spies, military commanders, and business executives who took it upon themselves to depose monarchs, presidents, and prime ministers. He recounts how America's long regime-change century began in Hawaii and gained momentum during the Spanish-American War, when Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines fell to American military and political power. Soon afterward, the United States started flexing its muscles in Central America, orchestrating coups that brought down the presidents of Nicaragua and Honduras. Kinzer then shows how the Cold War rivalry with the Soviet Union led American leaders to view all political disputes through the lens of superpower competition. During this period, they arranged covert actions that led to the murder of a South Vietnamese president and the fall of democratic governments in Iran, Guatemala, and Chile. In recent years, invasions have once again become the preferred instrument of regime change, as operations in Grenada, Panama, Afghanistan, and Iraq attest. The United States usually succeeds when it sets out to depose a foreign leader, but Kinzer assesses these operations in the cold light of history and concludes that many of them have actually undermined American security. Overthrow is a cautionary tale that serves as a warning as the United States seeks to define its role in the modern world. Kinzer has written a detailed, passionate and convincing book, several chapters of which have the pace and grip of a good thriller. It should be essential reading for any Americans who wish to understand both their country's historical record in international affairs, and why that record has provoked anger and distrust in much of the world. Most important, it helps explain why, outside of Eastern Europe, American pronouncements about spreading democracy and freedom, as repeatedly employed by the Bush administration, are met with widespread incredulity.--Anatol Lieven, The New York Times Book Review Overthrow is an infuriating recitation of our government's military bullying over the past 110 years--a century of interventions around the world that resulted in the overthrow of 14 governments--in Hawaii, Cuba, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Vietnam, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras, Panama, Chile, Iran, Grenada, Afghanistan, and . . . Iraq.--The Texas ObserverIn this fascinating history, Kinzer explores the reasons for such operations and what they accomplished. The pattern of regime-change operations has followed the arc of U.S. global engagement in the twentieth century . . . Across the cases, which are recounted in lively and colorful detail, Kinzer argues that the motives for regime change have ranged from the prosaic and the pecuniary to the principled and the strategic. But in each case, action was undertaken when foreign governments refused to protect U.S. interests as defined at the moment . . . A useful portrait of the presidents who have influenced the exercise of U.S. power and the interesting judgment that interventions have often succeeded in their immediate goals but failed to advance U.S. interests in the long term.--G. John Ikenberry, Foreign Affairs To be shocked and awed by history is not a common reading experience. One usually reserves such reactions for edgy fiction, juicy memoirs or newsy exposes. Yet Stephen Kinzer's Overthrow: America's Century of Regime Change From Hawaii to Iraq is as g

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