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The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA

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The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA Cover

ISBN13: 9780809089475
ISBN10: 0809089475
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Lets face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an asexual alien race threatened by disease, whos been charged with researching the fundamentals of human DNA and evolution and laying it all out in clear, simple language so that even his slow-to-grasp-the-point leader can get it. In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloorts predicament becomes the means of giving even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics thats as easy to understand as it is entertaining to read.
Mark Schultz has written for DC Comics and Marvel Comics, and his scripts and illustrations—most notably for his tour-de-force series Xenozoic Tales (also known as Cadillacs and Dinosaurs) and Superman—have garnered five Harvey Awards, two Eisners, and an Inkpot.
 
Illustrators Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon have worked for clients ranging from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to DC Comics, collaborating on such titles as The Replacement God and Smax and winning two Eisners for their work on Top 10.
A YALSA Great Graphic Novel for Teens

A Seed Magazine Best Book of the Year

A Texas Library Association Young Adult Round Table Recommended Graphic Novel

Lets face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an asexual alien race threatened by disease, whos been charged with researching the fundamentals of human DNA and evolution and laying it all out in clear, simple language so that even his slow-to-grasp-the-point leader can get it.

 
In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloorts predicament becomes the means of giving even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics thats as easy to understand as it is entertaining to read.
“With the graphic novel gaining status as a form of serious storytelling, The Stuff of Life makes a case for the graphic-novel textbook . . . The illustrations are simultaneously cute and explanatory, and the texts oversimplifications and techno-utopianism are justified for a cartoon treatment of one of the most complex stories in science.”—Seed magazine
"I bought this book because I am always looking for new ways to teach things to my high school students. After reading it, I went to my department head and (after he looked at the book) had little trouble convincing him to buy a classroom set to use to teach the basics of genetics . . . The students all seem to enjoy taking some time out to read (no mean feat in and of itself), and some have even said that seeing the pictures in the book has helped them with topics they were having trouble with . . . Some of the words used that are unrelated to science are a bit advanced (a great opportunity to teach more vocabulary), but the terms related to genetics are well explained and there is even a glossary to help students still having trouble."—Shawn Stewart, Science Teacher, Northeast Magnet High School, Wichita, Kansas

"With the graphic novel gaining status as a form of serious storytelling, The Stuff of Life makes a case for the graphic-novel textbook . . . The illustrations are simultaneously cute and explanatory, and the texts oversimplifications and techno-utopianism are justified for a cartoon treatment of one of the most complex stories in science."—Seed magazine

"Not too long ago, the term 'graphic nonfiction' might have referred to how-to manuals, editorial cartoons or field guides to flora and fauna. But recently, Farrar, Straus and Giroux has released several works by nonfiction writers using pictures to help tell a story—to leaven a dense topic or to help the information flow. The topics are as varied as the U.S. Constitution, modern dancer Isadora Duncan and the human genetic code . . . Genetic mutation is at the core of countless comic books, resulting in superhuman powers and responsible for heroes and villains alike. That concept gets its due in Mark Schultz, Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon's The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA. But this is a serious book, not one that explores whether exposure to high doses of radiation might result in super strength, X-ray vision or the ability to stretch and flow like molten plastic. Fortunately, it's not without its comic-book conventions. It's structured as 'a detailed translation of the report of Bloort 183, interplanetary biologist of the Glargal Royal Science Academy.' The story begins five billion years ago with the formation of Earth and leaps from there to the creation of life in one page. Evolution from basic life forms to humans takes another two pages. Then Bloort 183 starts to tell the story of life on Earth and how every living thing shares the ability to pass on characteristics via what Earthlings call DNA. Mark Schultz is the star of the book, using the otherworldly naiveté of the aliens to get laughs, as well as to break down facts of life into introductory building blocks, like the idea of sex—'a strategy that allows for the sharing of genetic information between individuals within a species.' The book is dense with information like a good textbook. But Schultz's wit and the alien-report device make it easier to learn what you didn't understand in high school."—Michael Gill, The Cleveland Free Times

"What's the solution to America's crisis in science education? More comic books. In December comes The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA, a remarkably thorough explanation of the science of genetics, from Mendel to Venter, with a strand of social urgency spliced in . . . Stuff of Life is the first in a series dedicated to the hard sciences. The author is Mark Schultz, a DC Comics veteran and creator of the postapocalyptic classic Xenozoic Tales. The 160-page work, illustrated by Kevin Cannon and Zander Cannon (improbably, no genetic relation), covers the regenerative processes of DNA, human migratory patterns, cloned apples, and stem cells. In a rapidly changing field, it's as up-to-date and accurate as possible . . . Not that this is the first time comics have been enlisted for educational purposes. The field goes back to the 1940s, when Will Eisner turned Army instructional manuals into graphic guides for soldiers. Also, there's Larry Gonick's Cartoon Guides of the '80s, with his Cartoon Guide to Genetics being the most obvious precursor here. Stuff of Life builds on Gonick, updating his science and employing a silly yet more effective narrative—alien scientist Bloort 183 presents a Power Point on human genetics to his slow-learning leader."—Barry Harbaugh, Wired

"It takes a rare breed of graphic novelist to bring genetics and DNA out of the laboratory and onto the funny pages, but Mark Schultz was up to the task. Get ready to dive into cloning, stem-cell research, and bacteria therapy with a cast of screwball characters—from eccentric spliced DNA to bumbling bacteria to manic, genetically modified plants (‘I feel tingly all over!). Youll be so charmed that you wont even notice youve absorbed an entire scientific field (screened for accuracy by genetics professors) in 140 pages of wacked-out comics."—Tobin Hack, Plenty

"Those of us who didnt exactly fly through our science courses (theres a reason some of us turned to English) will appreciate The Stuff of Life. I imagine most everyone would, even the scientists and science enthusiasts who managed to grasp difficult theories and concepts early on. The Stuff of Life is incredibly thorough and, best of all, wonderfully accessible for experts and laymen alike. The book has already been tagged with high praise and awards (a Great Graphic Novels for Teens nominee from YALSA, a Scientific American Book Club Alternate Selection, a feature in Wired magazine). Its a bit difficult to decide where to place the book: Its scientifically accurate, a point it rightfully prides itself on, but its also a quite fictional account of an asexual alien race attempting to learn more about our planet. So, fiction it is, but keep in mind that the data is sound here. In fact, the book is the first in a planned series devoted to teaching real and accurate science through graphic novels. Writer Mark Schultz and artists Zander and Kevin Cannon deserve praise for taking such potentially dry topic material and making it not only understandable but also fresh. Its not childish (although it does have touches of that) and its not so irreverent that it misses its own point. The Stuff of Life has a daunting task: Walk the fine line between education and entertainment without veering too far off into either direction."—John Hogan, Graphic Novel Reporter

"Bone up on how genetics works with The Stuff of Life, a delightful cartoon crash course in chromosomes, cytokenesis, and the whole ball of human wax."—Anneli Rufus, East Bay Express

"The Stuff of Life is a beautifully written and lavishly illustrated example of the power of comics to communicate the wonders of the natural world. Mark Schultzs words combine with Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannons pictures in a dynamic enzymatic reaction that gives readers a glimpse at how life works. Ambitious, expansive, and completely successful, the story in The Stuff of Life starts on the invisible rungs of DNA and climbs without a misstep across the millennia of organic evolution. With the help of Bloort, an alien exploring the wonders of earthly genetics, we get to see our evolutionary and genetic heritage in a new light. Often funny and always engrossing, The Stuff of Life provides an exciting point of entry for anyone interested in how life on earth shapes and reshapes itself in the face of ever-changing conditions. Learning genetics just got a whole lot more fun."—Jay Hosler, Associate Professor of Biology at Juniata College and author and illustrator of Clan Apis and The Sandwalk Adventures

"Mark Schultzs brilliant, whacky The Stuff of Life could hardly have arrived at a better time, with advances in genetics transforming the biological sciences—from microbiology to medicine. This is serious fun."—Jessica Snyder Sachs, author of Good Germs, Bad Germs: Health and Survival in a Bacterial World

"Drawn with panache and great good humor by Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon, and scripted with exceptional clarity by Schultz, this is pretty much the best educational graphic novel in Hill and Wangs new line of them, good enough for interested nonscientists to keep handy for whenever they need a refresher on its subject. It even has a happy—well, promising—ending."—Ray Olson, Booklist

"Much is packed into this book, which includes information on molecular and cellular life, the basic mechanics of genetics, key scientists who have made discoveries in genetics and DNA, and how they have been and are applying this knowledge. Touching on topics such as genetically altered foods and cloning, Schultz is careful to acknowledge controversial subjects while maintaining an unbiased view. His writing is informative, easy to follow, and infused with humor. The detailed black-and-white illustrations are a perfect match, offering images to enhance learning while adding to the humorous aspect of the book . . . This title would do well as standard reading for science students."—Lara McAllister, Halifax Public Libraries, Nova Scotia, School Library Journal

Synopsis:

Lets face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an asexual alien race threatened by disease, whos been charged with researching the fundamentals of human DNA and evolution and laying it all out in clear, simple language so that even his slow-to-grasp-the-point leader can get it. In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloorts predicament becomes the means of giving even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics thats as easy to understand as it is entertaining to read.
Mark Schultz has written for DC Comics and Marvel Comics, and his scripts and illustrationsmost notably for his tour-de-force series Xenozoic Tales (also known as Cadillacs and Dinosaurs) and Supermanhave garnered five Harvey Awards, two Eisners, and an Inkpot.
 
Illustrators Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon have worked for clients ranging from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to DC Comics, collaborating on such titles as The Replacement God and Smax and winning two Eisners for their work on Top 10.
A YALSA Great Graphic Novel for Teens

A Seed Magazine Best Book of the Year

A Texas Library Association Young Adult Round Table Recommended Graphic Novel

Lets face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an asexual alien race threatened by disease, whos been charged with researching the fundamentals of human DNA and evolution and laying it all out in clear, simple language so that even his slow-to-grasp-the-point leader can get it.

 
In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloorts predicament becomes the means of giving even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics thats as easy to understand as it is entertaining to read.
“With the graphic novel gaining status as a form of serious storytelling, The Stuff of Life makes a case for the graphic-novel textbook . . . The illustrations are simultaneously cute and explanatory, and the texts oversimplifications and techno-utopianism are justified for a cartoon treatment of one of the most complex stories in science.”Seed magazine
"I bought this book because I am always looking for new ways to teach things to my high school students. After reading it, I went to my department head and (after he looked at the book) had little trouble convincing him to buy a classroom set to use to teach the basics of genetics . . . The students all seem to enjoy taking some time out to read (no mean feat in and of itself), and some have even said that seeing the pictures in the book has helped them with topics they were having trouble with . . . Some of the words used that are unrelated to science are a bit advanced (a great opportunity to teach more vocabulary), but the terms related to genetics are well explained and there is even a glossary to help students still having trouble."Shawn Stewart, Science Teacher, Northeast Magnet High School, Wichita, Kansas

"With the graphic novel gaining status as a form of serious storytelling, The Stuff of Life makes a case for the graphic-novel textbook . . . The illustrations are simultaneously cute and explanatory, and the texts oversimplifications and techno-utopianism are justified for a cartoon treatment of one of the most complex stories in science."Seed magazine

"Not too long ago, the term 'graphic nonfiction' might have referred to how-to manuals, editorial cartoons or field guides to flora and fauna. But recently, Farrar, Straus and Giroux has released several works by nonfiction writers using pictures to help tell a storyto leaven a dense topic or to help the information flow. The topics are as varied as the U.S. Constitution, modern dancer Isadora Duncan and the human genetic code . . . Genetic mutation is at the core of countless comic books, resulting in superhuman powers and responsible for heroes and villains alike. That concept gets its due in Mark Schultz, Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon's The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA. But this is a serious book, not one that explores whether exposure to high doses of radiation might result in super strength, X-ray vision or the ability to stretch and flow like molten plastic. Fortunately, it's not without its comic-book conventions. It's structured as 'a detailed translation of the report of Bloort 183, interplanetary biologist of the Glargal Royal Science Academy.' The story begins five billion years ago with the formation of Earth and leaps from there to the creation of life in one page. Evolution from basic life forms to humans takes another two pages. Then Bloort 183 starts to tell the story of life on Earth and how every living thing shares the ability to pass on characteristics via what Earthlings call DNA. Mark Schultz is the star of the book, using the otherworldly naiveté of the aliens to get laughs, as well as to break down facts of life into introductory building blocks, like the idea of sex'a strategy that allows for the sharing of genetic information between individuals within a species.' The book is dense with information like a good textbook. But Schultz's wit and the alien-report device make it easier to learn what you didn't understand in high school."Michael Gill, The Cleveland Free Times

"What's the solution to America's crisis in science education? More comic books. In December comes The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA, a remarkably thorough explanation of the science of genetics, from Mendel to Venter, with a strand of social urgency spliced in . . . Stuff of Life is the first in a series dedicated to the hard sciences. The author is Mark Schultz, a DC Comics veteran and creator of the postapocalyptic classic Xenozoic Tales. The 160-page work, illustrated by Kevin Cannon and Zander Cannon (improbably, no genetic relation), covers the regenerative processes of DNA, human migratory patterns, cloned apples, and stem cells. In a rapidly changing field, it's as up-to-date and accurate as possible . . . Not that this is the first time comics have been enlisted for educational purposes. The field goes back to the 1940s, when Will Eisner turned Army instructional manuals into graphic guides for soldiers. Also, there's Larry Gonick's Cartoon Guides of the '80s, with his Cartoon Guide to Genetics being the most obvious precursor here. Stuff of Life builds on Gonick, updating his science and employing a silly yet more effective narrativealien scientist Bloort 183 presents a Power Point on human genetics to his slow-learning leader."Barry Harbaugh, Wired

"It takes a rare breed of graphic novelist to bring genetics and DNA out of the laboratory and onto the funny pages, but Mark Schultz was up to the task. Get ready to dive into cloning, stem-cell research, and bacteria therapy with a cast of screwball charactersfrom eccentric spliced DNA to bumbling bacteria to manic, genetically modified plants (‘I feel tingly all over!). Youll be so charmed that y

Synopsis:

Lets face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an asexual alien race threatened by disease, whos been charged with researching the fundamentals of human DNA and evolution and laying it all out in clear, simple language so that even his slow-to-grasp-the-point leader can get it. In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloorts predicament becomes the means of giving even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics thats as easy to understand as it is entertaining to read.

About the Author

Mark Schultz has written for DC Comics and Marvel Comics, and his scripts and illustrations—most notably for his tour-de-force series Xenozoic Tales (also known as Cadillacs and Dinosaurs) and Superman—have garnered five Harvey Awards, two Eisners, and an Inkpot.
 
Illustrators Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon have worked for clients ranging from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to DC Comics, collaborating on such titles as The Replacement God and Smax and winning two Eisners for their work on Top 10.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

nikki monacelli, November 13, 2009 (view all comments by nikki monacelli)
It's really hard to find interesting books that both my son & I can enjoy together. Granted, I'm a permenent grade schooler who loves all thing science, while my son is actually a grade schooler, who also loves science but finds reading challenging.

Now that he's fallen in love with graphic novels, we killed two birds with one stone while reading this: reading and science together! In a form that both of us truly appreciated. If you're gonna read comics, why not gain some scientific knowledge along the way, eh?

The artwork is nothing short of fantastic, making science into almost fantasy, at least artisitcally. But this just adds to the prose, which actually more than held my attention. I wanted to keep reading more and more, long after bedtime.

This is a book for adults, I know, but it totally brought out the child in me and made me yearn for more.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(0 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780809089475
Author:
Schultz, Mark
Publisher:
Hill & Wang
Illustrator:
Cannon, Kevin
Illustrator:
Cannon, Zander; Cannon, Kevin
Illustrator:
Cannon, Zander
Author:
Cannon, Kevin
Author:
Cannon, Zander
Subject:
General science
Subject:
General
Subject:
Life Sciences - Genetics & Genomics
Subject:
Nonfiction
Subject:
Graphic Novels
Subject:
Dna
Subject:
Comic books, strips, etc.
Subject:
Biology-Genetics
Subject:
Genetics
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20090131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes Black-and-White Illustrations T
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
9.04 x 6.51 x 0.405 in

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Related Subjects


Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Alternative
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » General
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Nonfiction
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Genetics
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Genetics

The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA Used Trade Paper
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$7.95 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Hill & Wang - English 9780809089475 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Lets face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an asexual alien race threatened by disease, whos been charged with researching the fundamentals of human DNA and evolution and laying it all out in clear, simple language so that even his slow-to-grasp-the-point leader can get it. In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloorts predicament becomes the means of giving even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics thats as easy to understand as it is entertaining to read.
Mark Schultz has written for DC Comics and Marvel Comics, and his scripts and illustrationsmost notably for his tour-de-force series Xenozoic Tales (also known as Cadillacs and Dinosaurs) and Supermanhave garnered five Harvey Awards, two Eisners, and an Inkpot.
 
Illustrators Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon have worked for clients ranging from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to DC Comics, collaborating on such titles as The Replacement God and Smax and winning two Eisners for their work on Top 10.
A YALSA Great Graphic Novel for Teens

A Seed Magazine Best Book of the Year

A Texas Library Association Young Adult Round Table Recommended Graphic Novel

Lets face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an asexual alien race threatened by disease, whos been charged with researching the fundamentals of human DNA and evolution and laying it all out in clear, simple language so that even his slow-to-grasp-the-point leader can get it.

 
In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloorts predicament becomes the means of giving even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics thats as easy to understand as it is entertaining to read.
“With the graphic novel gaining status as a form of serious storytelling, The Stuff of Life makes a case for the graphic-novel textbook . . . The illustrations are simultaneously cute and explanatory, and the texts oversimplifications and techno-utopianism are justified for a cartoon treatment of one of the most complex stories in science.”Seed magazine
"I bought this book because I am always looking for new ways to teach things to my high school students. After reading it, I went to my department head and (after he looked at the book) had little trouble convincing him to buy a classroom set to use to teach the basics of genetics . . . The students all seem to enjoy taking some time out to read (no mean feat in and of itself), and some have even said that seeing the pictures in the book has helped them with topics they were having trouble with . . . Some of the words used that are unrelated to science are a bit advanced (a great opportunity to teach more vocabulary), but the terms related to genetics are well explained and there is even a glossary to help students still having trouble."Shawn Stewart, Science Teacher, Northeast Magnet High School, Wichita, Kansas

"With the graphic novel gaining status as a form of serious storytelling, The Stuff of Life makes a case for the graphic-novel textbook . . . The illustrations are simultaneously cute and explanatory, and the texts oversimplifications and techno-utopianism are justified for a cartoon treatment of one of the most complex stories in science."Seed magazine

"Not too long ago, the term 'graphic nonfiction' might have referred to how-to manuals, editorial cartoons or field guides to flora and fauna. But recently, Farrar, Straus and Giroux has released several works by nonfiction writers using pictures to help tell a storyto leaven a dense topic or to help the information flow. The topics are as varied as the U.S. Constitution, modern dancer Isadora Duncan and the human genetic code . . . Genetic mutation is at the core of countless comic books, resulting in superhuman powers and responsible for heroes and villains alike. That concept gets its due in Mark Schultz, Zander Cannon and Kevin Cannon's The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA. But this is a serious book, not one that explores whether exposure to high doses of radiation might result in super strength, X-ray vision or the ability to stretch and flow like molten plastic. Fortunately, it's not without its comic-book conventions. It's structured as 'a detailed translation of the report of Bloort 183, interplanetary biologist of the Glargal Royal Science Academy.' The story begins five billion years ago with the formation of Earth and leaps from there to the creation of life in one page. Evolution from basic life forms to humans takes another two pages. Then Bloort 183 starts to tell the story of life on Earth and how every living thing shares the ability to pass on characteristics via what Earthlings call DNA. Mark Schultz is the star of the book, using the otherworldly naiveté of the aliens to get laughs, as well as to break down facts of life into introductory building blocks, like the idea of sex'a strategy that allows for the sharing of genetic information between individuals within a species.' The book is dense with information like a good textbook. But Schultz's wit and the alien-report device make it easier to learn what you didn't understand in high school."Michael Gill, The Cleveland Free Times

"What's the solution to America's crisis in science education? More comic books. In December comes The Stuff of Life: A Graphic Guide to Genetics and DNA, a remarkably thorough explanation of the science of genetics, from Mendel to Venter, with a strand of social urgency spliced in . . . Stuff of Life is the first in a series dedicated to the hard sciences. The author is Mark Schultz, a DC Comics veteran and creator of the postapocalyptic classic Xenozoic Tales. The 160-page work, illustrated by Kevin Cannon and Zander Cannon (improbably, no genetic relation), covers the regenerative processes of DNA, human migratory patterns, cloned apples, and stem cells. In a rapidly changing field, it's as up-to-date and accurate as possible . . . Not that this is the first time comics have been enlisted for educational purposes. The field goes back to the 1940s, when Will Eisner turned Army instructional manuals into graphic guides for soldiers. Also, there's Larry Gonick's Cartoon Guides of the '80s, with his Cartoon Guide to Genetics being the most obvious precursor here. Stuff of Life builds on Gonick, updating his science and employing a silly yet more effective narrativealien scientist Bloort 183 presents a Power Point on human genetics to his slow-learning leader."Barry Harbaugh, Wired

"It takes a rare breed of graphic novelist to bring genetics and DNA out of the laboratory and onto the funny pages, but Mark Schultz was up to the task. Get ready to dive into cloning, stem-cell research, and bacteria therapy with a cast of screwball charactersfrom eccentric spliced DNA to bumbling bacteria to manic, genetically modified plants (‘I feel tingly all over!). Youll be so charmed that y

"Synopsis" by ,
Lets face it: From adenines to zygotes, from cytokinesis to parthenogenesis, even the basics of genetics can sound utterly alien. So who better than an alien to explain it all? Enter Bloort 183, a scientist from an asexual alien race threatened by disease, whos been charged with researching the fundamentals of human DNA and evolution and laying it all out in clear, simple language so that even his slow-to-grasp-the-point leader can get it. In the hands of the award-winning writer Mark Schultz, Bloorts predicament becomes the means of giving even the most science-phobic reader a complete introduction to the history and science of genetics thats as easy to understand as it is entertaining to read.
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