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3 Remote Warehouse World History- Middle East

The End of Modern History in the Middle East (Hoover Inst Press Publication)

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The End of Modern History in the Middle East (Hoover Inst Press Publication) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For the first time in almost two hundred years, the rulers, and to some extent the peoples, of the Middle East must accept responsibility for their own affairs, to make and recognize their own mistakes, and to accept the consequences. Today, increasing numbers of Middle Easterners, disillusioned with past ideals and—in many countries—alienated from their present rulers, are turning their thoughts or their loyalties or both to one of two ideologies: liberal democracy or Islamic fundamentalism. Each offers a reasoned diagnosis of the ills of the region and a prescription for their cure. But if freedom fails and terror triumphs, the peoples of Islam will be the first and greatest victims. They will not be alone, and many others will suffer with them.

In The End of Modern History in the Middle East, Bernard Lewis looks at this new era there. With the departure of imperial powers, the region must now, on its own, resolve the political, economic, cultural, and societal problems that have held it back in the world. Lewis details the critical issues for the future of the region—not surprisingly, oil and water will be key—and the important elements that could help transform the Middle East: women, Turkey, and Israel. Women, he explains, have the strongest vested interest in social and political freedom. Turkey can and probably will play a growing role in the region because the Turks have greater political experience, a more developed economy, and a more balanced society than the Arab states. And the Arab-Israeli conflict as well, in one way or another, will profoundly influence the development of the region as a whole. If the struggle becomes more bitter, it will have a corrosive effect on both Israeli and Arab societies. Peace, in contrast, would speed the progress of the region toward a new age of advanced technology and political freedom. But the continuing struggle within the region, with the consequent diversion of energy and resources to the politics and weaponry of war, can only make likely a resumption of outside interference and domination.

Book News Annotation:

This work contains four stand-alone chapters by Lewis (emeritus, Near Eastern studies, Princeton U.) on the contemporary Middle East. The first, which also provides the title for the volume as a whole, is based on the dubious premise that with the end of the Cold War, the political and military interference of the West in the region that began with Napoleon's invasion of Egypt (the beginning of "modern history" in the Middle East) has come to a clear end. Lewis speculates on how the various countries of the region will develop given this new era of independence. The second reflects on the history of propaganda in the region (and also incorporates the end of empire thesis into the discussion). The third focuses on Iran, portraying the country as an expansionary power that is perceived as a threat by the Sunni states of the region (although Lewis here elides the difference between the rulers of these states and their populations, who routinely rank Iran far below Israel and the United States as perceived threats) and as irredeemably hostile to Jews (ignoring the fact that the Persian Jews live a generally peaceful life in Iran), therefore requiring that Western states engage in disruption of the regime and preparation for possible military action (advice which seems rather contradictory to the premise of the first essay, to say the least). The final essay contends that Israel is the victim of a "new anti-Semitism" that holds Jews to higher standards than others, mainly Arabs, although Lewis is quick to protest that he is not equating criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The Middle East—on its own at last

With the departure of imperial powers, the Middle East must now, on its own, resolve the political, economic, cultural, and societal problems that prevent it from accomplishing the next stage in advancing civilization. In The End of Modern History in the Middle East, Bernard Lewis discusses the future of the region in this new, post imperialist era. For each and every country and for the region as a whole, he explains, there is a range of alternative futures: at one end, cooperation and progress; at the other, a vicious circle of poverty and ignorance.

The author examines in detail the issues most critical to the future of the region. He describes oil as the current most important export to the outside world from the Middle East but warns that technology will eventually make it obsolete, leaving those who depend solely on oil revenues with a bleak future. He also explains why water will become a contentious issue between nations of the region—offering a challenging choice between conflict and cooperation. The three factors that could most help transform the Middle East, according to Lewis, are Turkey, Israel, and women. If freedom fails and terror triumphs, he warns, the peoples of Islam will be the first and greatest victims.

Synopsis:

With the ending of global strategic confrontation between superpowers, those in the Middle East must adjust to a new reality: to accept final responsibility for their own affairs, to make and recognize their mistakes, and to accept the consequences. In The End of Modern History in the Middle East, Bernard Lewis discusses the future of the region in this new, postimperialist era. For each and every country and for the region as a whole, he explains, there is a range of alternative futures: at one end, cooperation and progress; at the other, a vicious circle of poverty and ignorance.

The author examines in detail the issues most critical to the region's future. He describes oil as the current, most important export to the outside world from the Middle East but warns that technology will eventually make it obsolete, leaving those who depend solely on oil revenues with a bleak future. The three factors that could most help transform the Middle East, according to Lewis, are Turkey, Israel, and women. He also argues that there is enough in the traditional culture of Islam on the one hand and the modern experience of the Muslim peoples on the other to provide the basis for an advance toward freedom in the true sense of that word and to achieve the social, cultural, and scientific changes necessary to bring the Middle East into line with the developed countries of both West and East.

About the Author

Today, increasing numbers of Middle Easterners, disillusioned with past ideals and–in many countries–alienated from their present rulers, are turning their thoughts or their loyalties to one or other of these two ideologies: liberal democracy or Islamic fundamentalism. Each offers a reasoned diagnosis of the ills of the region, and a prescription for its cure.”—“Faith and Freedom,” pg. 17

The likeliest–and the best–prospect for the coming years is a cold peace in which Israel might expect minimal cooperation from the political and diplomatic establishment to avoid war.”—“War and Peace,” pg. 31

Perhaps the greatest danger that threatens the Middle East is not wars between states but wars within states.”—“Center and Periphery,” pg. 36

“In time, the advance of science and technology, which made oil first useful and then necessary, will make it obsolete, and replace it with cleaner, cheaper, and more accessible sources of energy. . . . When that happens, those who depend on oil revenues will face a new and bleak reality.”—“Oil and Water,” pg. 43

“If it continues on its present course, the region, lacking the capacities of India and China on the one side or the technology of Europe and America on the other, will once again be a stake rather than a player in the great game of international politics.”—“A Return to Empire?” pg. 57

Perhaps the best hope for the region is the gradual if reluctant emancipation of women.”—“A Return to Greatness?” pg. 63

Product Details

ISBN:
9780817912949
Author:
Lewis, Bernard
Publisher:
Hoover Institution Press
Subject:
Middle East
Subject:
World History-Middle East
Subject:
General-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
1st Edition
Series:
Hoover Institution Press Publication
Series Volume:
604
Publication Date:
20110531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
216
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Asia » General
History and Social Science » Geography » General
History and Social Science » Middle East » General History
History and Social Science » Military » Strategy Tactics and Deception
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Islamic Studies
History and Social Science » Sociology » Regional Studies
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Middle East
Science and Mathematics » Geology » Earth Sciences
Science and Mathematics » Physics
Science and Mathematics » Physics » General

The End of Modern History in the Middle East (Hoover Inst Press Publication) New Hardcover
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Product details 216 pages Hoover Institution Press - English 9780817912949 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

The Middle East—on its own at last

With the departure of imperial powers, the Middle East must now, on its own, resolve the political, economic, cultural, and societal problems that prevent it from accomplishing the next stage in advancing civilization. In The End of Modern History in the Middle East, Bernard Lewis discusses the future of the region in this new, post imperialist era. For each and every country and for the region as a whole, he explains, there is a range of alternative futures: at one end, cooperation and progress; at the other, a vicious circle of poverty and ignorance.

The author examines in detail the issues most critical to the future of the region. He describes oil as the current most important export to the outside world from the Middle East but warns that technology will eventually make it obsolete, leaving those who depend solely on oil revenues with a bleak future. He also explains why water will become a contentious issue between nations of the region—offering a challenging choice between conflict and cooperation. The three factors that could most help transform the Middle East, according to Lewis, are Turkey, Israel, and women. If freedom fails and terror triumphs, he warns, the peoples of Islam will be the first and greatest victims.

"Synopsis" by ,

With the ending of global strategic confrontation between superpowers, those in the Middle East must adjust to a new reality: to accept final responsibility for their own affairs, to make and recognize their mistakes, and to accept the consequences. In The End of Modern History in the Middle East, Bernard Lewis discusses the future of the region in this new, postimperialist era. For each and every country and for the region as a whole, he explains, there is a range of alternative futures: at one end, cooperation and progress; at the other, a vicious circle of poverty and ignorance.

The author examines in detail the issues most critical to the region's future. He describes oil as the current, most important export to the outside world from the Middle East but warns that technology will eventually make it obsolete, leaving those who depend solely on oil revenues with a bleak future. The three factors that could most help transform the Middle East, according to Lewis, are Turkey, Israel, and women. He also argues that there is enough in the traditional culture of Islam on the one hand and the modern experience of the Muslim peoples on the other to provide the basis for an advance toward freedom in the true sense of that word and to achieve the social, cultural, and scientific changes necessary to bring the Middle East into line with the developed countries of both West and East.

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