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The Liberation of the Laity: In Search of an Accountable Church

The Liberation of the Laity: In Search of an Accountable Church Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Best Theology Book 2004 - Catholic Press Assocation

The present crisis in the American Catholic Church stems from a two-fold source: lay people are powerless while the bishops are accountable to no one but the pope and the curia. While the number of lay people exercising ministries in the church has grown enormously over the past thirty years (largely due to the shortage of priests), there has been little or no theological reflection till now on the genuine role of the laity. It is only from such reflection that structural reform of the church will come.

The first half of The Liberation of the Laity concentrates on the fortunes of the laity, theologically speaking, between Vatican I (1870) and Vatican II (1962-65). It examines the growth of the "new theology" in France in the 1940s and 1950s and shows how in the work of one of its leading practitioners, Yves Congar, much of the vision of the laity expressed at Vatican II was anticipated.

Seeing the years after the council as decades of missed opportunities to recognize the role of the laity, the book then turns to a series of constructive proposals for the liberation of the laity, and thus the liberation of the church. It discusses the importance of "secularity," the need for a "lay liberation theology," and the centrality of the struggles against global capitalism in the mission of the church.

It ends with a chapter envisioning dramatic changes in ministry and governing structures, in which accountability will be central, "servant leaders" will include women and married people, and both ecclesiastical careerism and the College of Cardinals will be history.

Book News Annotation:

Lakeland (religious studies, Fairfield U.) attributes the general malaise he sees hanging over the Catholic Church to an outmoded understanding of the ministry and a failure to harness the apostolic potential of the laity. He explores past and potential thoughts on the role of the laity in the church. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Best Theology Book 2004 - Catholic Press AssocationThe present crisis in the American Catholic Church stems from a two-fold source: lay people are powerless while the bishops are accountable to no one but the pope and the curia. While the number of lay people exercising ministries in the church has grown enormously over the past thirty years (largely due to the shortage of priests), there has been little or no theological reflection till now on the genuine role of the laity. It is only from such reflection that structural reform of the church will come.The first half of The Liberation of the Laity concentrates on the fortunes of the laity, theologically speaking, between Vatican I (1870) and Vatican II (1962-65). It examines the growth of the "new theology" in France in the 1940s and 1950s and shows how in the work of one of its leading practitioners, Yves Congar, much of the vision of the laity expressed at Vatican II was anticipated. Seeing the years after the council as decades of missed opportunities to recognize the role of the laity, the book then turns to a series of constructive proposals for the liberation of the laity, and thus the liberation of the church. It discusses the importance of "secularity," the need for a "lay liberation theology," and the centrality of the struggles against global capitalism in the mission of the church. It ends with a chapter envisioning dramatic changes in ministry and governing structures, in which accountability will be central, "servant leaders" will include women and married people, and both ecclesiastical careerism and the College of Cardinals will be history.

Synopsis:

Best Theology Book 2004 - Catholic Press Assocation

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Idea of the LaityPart 1: How We Got to Where We Are1.The Road to Vatican II2.The Achievement of Yves Congar 3. Collegiality, Coresponsibility, and the Council 4. Theology and the Laity since Vatican II Part 2: Where We Go from Here5. Secularity 6. Liberation of the Laity7. Mission of the (Post) Modern World8. An Accountable ChurchNotesIndex

Product Details

ISBN:
9780826414830
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Location:
New York
Author:
Lakeland, Paul
Subject:
Leadership
Subject:
Catholic church
Subject:
Laity
Subject:
Christianity - Theology - Catholic
Subject:
Christianity - History - Catholic
Subject:
Christianity - Church Administration - General
Subject:
Christian Church - Church Administration
Subject:
Christian Theology - Catholic
Subject:
Laity -- Catholic Church.
Subject:
Catholic Church - Membership
Subject:
Christianity - Catholicism
Subject:
Religion Western-Theology
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
576
Publication Date:
20040519
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9.37 x 6.36 x 1 in

Related Subjects

Religion » Christianity » Catholicism
Religion » Christianity » Pastoral Ministry and Church Leadership
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Western Religions » Theology

The Liberation of the Laity: In Search of an Accountable Church
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Product details 320 pages Continuum International Publishing Group - English 9780826414830 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Best Theology Book 2004 - Catholic Press AssocationThe present crisis in the American Catholic Church stems from a two-fold source: lay people are powerless while the bishops are accountable to no one but the pope and the curia. While the number of lay people exercising ministries in the church has grown enormously over the past thirty years (largely due to the shortage of priests), there has been little or no theological reflection till now on the genuine role of the laity. It is only from such reflection that structural reform of the church will come.The first half of The Liberation of the Laity concentrates on the fortunes of the laity, theologically speaking, between Vatican I (1870) and Vatican II (1962-65). It examines the growth of the "new theology" in France in the 1940s and 1950s and shows how in the work of one of its leading practitioners, Yves Congar, much of the vision of the laity expressed at Vatican II was anticipated. Seeing the years after the council as decades of missed opportunities to recognize the role of the laity, the book then turns to a series of constructive proposals for the liberation of the laity, and thus the liberation of the church. It discusses the importance of "secularity," the need for a "lay liberation theology," and the centrality of the struggles against global capitalism in the mission of the church. It ends with a chapter envisioning dramatic changes in ministry and governing structures, in which accountability will be central, "servant leaders" will include women and married people, and both ecclesiastical careerism and the College of Cardinals will be history.
"Synopsis" by , Best Theology Book 2004 - Catholic Press Assocation
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