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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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    Juliet's Nurse

    Lois Leveen 9781476757445

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A New History of Jazz

A New History of Jazz Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The March 1913 issue of the San Francisco Bulletin coined the term "jazz" - using it to describe a dance music full of vigor and "pep." Over time, jazz became the word used to describe the syncopated bands that became popular in New Orleans at the turn of the twentieth century, playing a fiery mix of African and European music that then became popular in Chicago and New York and, finally, the world over. It wasn't long before the Roaring 1920s became known as "the Jazz Age," forever attaching the music form to decadence, booze, sex, and dancing.In his mammoth book A New History of Jazz, BBC presenter and London Times jazz critic Alyn Shipton investigates how jazz first started - examining the precursors of the music, identifying the difficulties in mapping out its history, and challenging the traditional views of its development. More than just a rote narrative, A New History of Jazz provides critical analysis of the jazz history that has been "written" among both academics and musicians over the last century. Shipton argues that the music's history is so characterized by underground clubs, regional styles, and the "fringe" element in general that previous attempts at tracing its routes have failed to grasp the big picture. He even questions the possibility of creating a universally applicable definition of jazz. Shipton also explores how different things contributed to the modern notions of jazz music. He examines how the development of sound recordings, instrumental innovations, and new methods of music publishing took the art form from its bayou routes to different urban areas around the country, and finally beyond the borders of the United States. A New History of Jazz further examines how the network of theaters, concert halls, and performances that sprang up all over the United States in the twentieth century contributed to the spread of the music's popularity and the different styles that have developed over the years. Leaving no stone unturned, Shipton's history of jazz is as sweeping as it is personal. This is the book that jazz aficionados have been waiting for, as well as an excellent primer for the casual fan.

Book News Annotation:

A history of jazz music in the United States and abroad that focuses significantly on the personalities who were behind the creation of the music. Shipton (music critic for The Times (London)) avoids technical musicologist jargon in his enthusiastic descriptions of compositions and musicians. From the antecedents of the music gathering in New Orleans to the followers of Ornette Coleman's school of "Harmolodics," all of the major players are discussed and their styles and innovations are put in context. Of particular note is discussion of jazz as it played out in Europe, Africa, and elsewhere, a story often neglected in histories of the music. Not infrequent reference is made to a CD from Columbia records () and when a song on the CD is being discussed, the track title and number is listed. Containing only 33 songs, the CD seems more of an afterthought than a true companion to the book.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The March 1913 issue of the San Francisco Bulletin coined the term "jazz" - using it to describe a dance music full of vigor and "pep." Over time, jazz became the word used to describe the syncopated bands that became popular in New Orleans at the turn of the twentieth century, playing a fiery mix of African and European music that then became popular in Chicago and New York and, finally, the world over. It wasn't long before the Roaring 1920s became known as "the Jazz Age," forever attaching the music form to decadence, booze, sex, and dancing.In his mammoth book A New History of Jazz, BBC presenter and London Times jazz critic Alyn Shipton investigates how jazz first started - examining the precursors of the music, identifying the difficulties in mapping out its history, and challenging the traditional views of its development. More than just a rote narrative, A New History of Jazz provides critical analysis of the jazz history that has been "written" among both academics and musicians over the last century. Shipton argues that the music's history is so characterized by underground clubs, regional styles, and the "fringe" element in general that previous attempts at tracing its routes have failed to grasp the big picture. He even questions the possibility of creating a universally applicable definition of jazz. Shipton also explores how different things contributed to the modern notions of jazz music. He examines how the development of sound recordings, instrumental innovations, and new methods of music publishing took the art form from its bayou routes to different urban areas around the country, and finally beyond the borders of the United States. A New History of Jazz further examines how the network of theaters, concert halls, and performances that sprang up all over the United States in the twentieth century contributed to the spread of the music's popularity and the different styles that have developed over the years. Leaving no stone unturned, Shipton's history of jazz is as sweeping as it is personal. This is the book that jazz aficionados have been waiting for, as well as an excellent primer for the casual fan.

Table of Contents

Contents Introduction and Background Origins/Precursors: including plantation music, ragtime, blues, brass bandsClassic Jazz: New Orleans, Chicago in the 1920s, ODJB, Keppard, Oliver, Armstrong, Bix Beiderbecke Piano Jazz: ragtime to stride, swing, boogie woogieThe Move to Larger Bands: Whiteman, Goldkette, Henderson, Ellington, Russell, Goodman, Shaw, Basie, Dorseys Interlude 1: International Jazz up to World War II From Swing to Bop Small Groups in Transition: John Kirby, Benny Carter, Coleman Hawkins, 52nd St Birth of Bebop: Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Kenny Clarke, Thelonious Monk, Oscar Pettiford How Bebop Developed: soloists, rhythm sections Larger Bands from Gillespie to Kenton and Herman Interlude 2: Dissemination: Summary of Recording and Broadcasting from 78s to Digital Technology Consolidation of Bop Early Miles Davis, from Birth of the Cool to Kind of Blue; Rollins, early Coltrane Hard Bop and Soul Jazz: Silver, Blakey, Morgan, Byrd, HendersonCool Jazz and the West Coast Movement: Evans, Mulligan, Baker, MJQ, Konitz, Tristano, Lighthouse Large Bands: From Thornhill through to the Basie New Testament Band Interlude 3: Jazz Singing to 1950 New Jazz Free Jazz: Ornette Coleman, The New Thing (Ayler, Shepp); Cecil Taylor Coltrane and Mingus Politicisation: BAG, AACM, Braxton, Tapscott Interlude 4: New Orleans, Revival and Mainstream Jazz, Including JATP Jazz as World Music Out of Africa: Jazz Epistles, Ibrahim, Masekela, McGregor, Pukwana, Pops Mahomen, Moses Molelekwa Latin Jazz: Afro-Cuban Jazz; Brazilian Jazz Europe: Scandinavia, France, Germany, UK, HollandInterlude 5: Jazz Singing from 1950 Postmodern Jazz Jazz Fusions Big Band Renaissance: Akiyoshi, Russell, Ecans, Carla Bley, David Murray Jazz Repertory, Education and Neo-Classicism Urban Movements: From M-Base to hip-hop, rap and funk Columbia Records CD Tie-In A New History of Jazz will include boxed inserts with detailed discussions of each of the following performances featured on the two-CD set Jazz the Definitive Performances, (Columbia Records/Sony Music, Columbia J2K 65807): Indiana: Original Dixieland Jazz Band* St Louis Blues: Bessie Smith* Dippermouth Blues: King Oliver* Stampede: Fletcher Henderson* Wild Cat Blues: Sidney Bechet/Clarence Williams* Singin the Blues: Frank Trumbauer and Bix Beiderbecke* West End Blues: Louis Armstrong* Tiger Rag: Art Tatum* God Bless the Child: Billie Holiday* Lester Leaps In: Count Basie* Flying Home: Benny Goodman* I Can't Get Started: Dizzie Gillespie* It Don't Mean a Thing: Duke Ellington* 9:30 Special: Coleman Hawkins/Basie* Let Me Off Uptown: Roy Eldridge/Gene Krupa* Tain't What'Cha Do: Jimmie Lunceford* Four Brothers: Woody Herman* Nica's Dream: Art Blakey/Horace Silver + Jazz Messengers* So What: Miles Davis/Coltrane/Cannonball Adderley/Bill Evans* Goodbye Pork Pie Hat: Mingus* Take Five: Dave Brubeck* It's All Right With Me: Erroll Garner* Straight No Chaser: Thelonious Monk* Searching: Duke Ellington* Sanctuary: Miles Davis* Meeting of the Spirits: John McLaughlin/Mahavishnu* Watermelon Man: Herbie Hancock* Birdland: Weather Report* Artist in America: Ornette Coleman* Round Midnight: Dexter Gordon* Steppin Out With My Baby: Tony Bennett* A Thousand Autumns: Branford Marsalis* Freedom is in the Trying: Wynton Marsalis. A sticker on each CD will refer to Alyn Shipton's book.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780826447548
Author:
Shipton, Alyn
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Author:
Shipton, Alyn L.
Location:
London
Subject:
General
Subject:
History & Criticism *
Subject:
History and criticism
Subject:
Jazz
Subject:
History & Criticism - General
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Jazz
Subject:
Jazz -- History and criticism.
Subject:
Music - Jazz
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
105-221
Publication Date:
20010931
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
965
Dimensions:
9.67 x 6.86 x 2.06 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Jazz
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Jazz » General
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

A New History of Jazz
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Product details 965 pages Continuum International Publishing Group - English 9780826447548 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The March 1913 issue of the San Francisco Bulletin coined the term "jazz" - using it to describe a dance music full of vigor and "pep." Over time, jazz became the word used to describe the syncopated bands that became popular in New Orleans at the turn of the twentieth century, playing a fiery mix of African and European music that then became popular in Chicago and New York and, finally, the world over. It wasn't long before the Roaring 1920s became known as "the Jazz Age," forever attaching the music form to decadence, booze, sex, and dancing.In his mammoth book A New History of Jazz, BBC presenter and London Times jazz critic Alyn Shipton investigates how jazz first started - examining the precursors of the music, identifying the difficulties in mapping out its history, and challenging the traditional views of its development. More than just a rote narrative, A New History of Jazz provides critical analysis of the jazz history that has been "written" among both academics and musicians over the last century. Shipton argues that the music's history is so characterized by underground clubs, regional styles, and the "fringe" element in general that previous attempts at tracing its routes have failed to grasp the big picture. He even questions the possibility of creating a universally applicable definition of jazz. Shipton also explores how different things contributed to the modern notions of jazz music. He examines how the development of sound recordings, instrumental innovations, and new methods of music publishing took the art form from its bayou routes to different urban areas around the country, and finally beyond the borders of the United States. A New History of Jazz further examines how the network of theaters, concert halls, and performances that sprang up all over the United States in the twentieth century contributed to the spread of the music's popularity and the different styles that have developed over the years. Leaving no stone unturned, Shipton's history of jazz is as sweeping as it is personal. This is the book that jazz aficionados have been waiting for, as well as an excellent primer for the casual fan.
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