25 Books to Read Before You Die
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 18, 2014

Ian Leslie: IMG Empathic Curiosity



Today, we wonder anxiously if digital media is changing our brains. But if there's any time in history when our mental operations changed... Continue »
  1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$7.95
List price: $12.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Beaverton Poetry- A to Z

More copies of this ISBN

The Winter Road: Prose Poems

by

The Winter Road: Prose Poems Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"Louis Jenkins writes satire as elegant as Horace but with motors in it and telephones and the North Shore."—Garrison Keillor

From the acknowledged "master" of the prose poem comes a new gathering of sixty poems. The work in The Winter Road comprises an extended meditation on the nature of memory and its influence on everyday reality. Within poems that turn whimsical, ironic, and serious, whole imaginative worlds are created and glide the reader into pleasing and unexpected territory. As when Coronado's search for gold lands him empty-handed in Kansas, Jenkins reminds us that "miracles always have a cost," and that our desire for absolute truth can sometimes lead us nowhere.

Louis Jenkins' poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Gettysburg Review, Kenyon Review, et al. and in The Best American Poetry 1999. He lives in Duluth, Minnesota.

Old Man Winter

Old man Winter doesn't like anything. He doesn't like dogs or

cats or squirrels or birds, especially seagulls, or children or

smart-ass college students. He doesn't like loggers or environ-

mentalists or snowmobilers or skiers in their stupid lycra outfits.

He doesn't like Christmas or television. He doesn't like bureau-

crats, lawyers or pliticians. There is a thing or two he could say

to the host of the local talk-radio show but he knows for a fact

that the son-of-a-bitch does the broadcast from his condo in

Florida. He's pissed off about the OPEC oil conspiracy and the

conspiracy of gas station owners to raise prices. He doesn't like

foreigners and he doesn't like his neighbors (not that he has

many); when they finally die they just leave their junk all over

the yard. He doesn't like that. He doesn't like the look of the sky

right now, either, overcast, a kind of jaundice color. He hates

that. And that stand of spruce trees behind the house turning

black in the dusk . . . . The way it gets dark earlier every day. He

doesn't like that.

Synopsis:

From one of the Midwest America's msot original poets, a new gathering of poems on life in the northern frontier, meditations on middle-age, et al.

Synopsis:

Cultural Writing. Prose. It's good to see Louis Jenkins again. He writes satire as elegant as Horace but with motors in it and telephones and the North Shore. He and I disagree about practically everything, so how is it that I like his poems so much? But here he is, on the coldest day of the year, talking about gypsies and heaven and radio, making sense — Garrison Keillor. 'The river wandered away as in a dream, no explanations, no parting words, the door ajar, newspapers blown across the floor...'So do these wonderfully quirky prose poems seem to wander. But when we look up fro the page, we have arrived someplace strange and new — Linda Pastan.

Synopsis:

From the acknowledged "master" of the prose poem comes a new gathering of sixty poems. The work in The Winter Road comprises an extended meditation on the nature of memory and its influence on everyday reality. Within poems that turn whimsical, ironic, and serious, whole imaginative worlds are created and glide the reader into pleasing and unexpected territory. As when Coronado's search for gold lands him empty-handed in Kansas, Jenkins reminds us that "miracles always have a cost."

About the Author

Louis Jenkins lives in Duluth, Minnesota. His poems have been published in numerous literary magazines and anthologies. Among his books of poetry are An Anlmost Human Gesture, All Tangled Up With the Living, Nice Fish: New and Selected Prose Poems (winner of the Minnesota Book Award) and Just Above Water. He has read his poems on A Prairie Home Companion and was featured poet at the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival in 1996. Two of his prose poems were published in The Best Ameriacn Poetry 1999.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780930100148
Author:
Jenkins, Louis
Publisher:
Holy Cow Press
Location:
Duluth, Minn.
Subject:
American
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Poetry
Subject:
Memory
Subject:
Prose poems, American
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Subject:
Single Author / American
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
2
Publication Date:
20001031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
72
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.3 in 4.5 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Feelings Above Sea Level: Prose... New Trade Paper $13.50
  2. Great American Prose Poems From Poe To Used Trade Paper $9.95
  3. High Water Mark: Prose Poems (Pitt... Used Trade Paper $8.00
  4. Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War Used Mass Market $2.95
  5. Faces & Masks Memory of Fire Volume 2 Used Trade Paper $9.50
  6. Century of the wind :part three of a... Used Trade Paper $7.50

Related Subjects

» Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

The Winter Road: Prose Poems Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 72 pages Holy Cow Press - English 9780930100148 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
From one of the Midwest America's msot original poets, a new gathering of poems on life in the northern frontier, meditations on middle-age, et al.
"Synopsis" by , Cultural Writing. Prose. It's good to see Louis Jenkins again. He writes satire as elegant as Horace but with motors in it and telephones and the North Shore. He and I disagree about practically everything, so how is it that I like his poems so much? But here he is, on the coldest day of the year, talking about gypsies and heaven and radio, making sense — Garrison Keillor. 'The river wandered away as in a dream, no explanations, no parting words, the door ajar, newspapers blown across the floor...'So do these wonderfully quirky prose poems seem to wander. But when we look up fro the page, we have arrived someplace strange and new — Linda Pastan.
"Synopsis" by , From the acknowledged "master" of the prose poem comes a new gathering of sixty poems. The work in The Winter Road comprises an extended meditation on the nature of memory and its influence on everyday reality. Within poems that turn whimsical, ironic, and serious, whole imaginative worlds are created and glide the reader into pleasing and unexpected territory. As when Coronado's search for gold lands him empty-handed in Kansas, Jenkins reminds us that "miracles always have a cost."
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.