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1 Beaverton Science Reference- General

The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science

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The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science Cover

ISBN13: 9781400031870
ISBN10: 1400031877
Condition: Standard
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Awards

Staff Pick

Richard Holmes's The Age of Wonder is at once a history of Regency-era scientific discovery and a meditation on what the pursuit of science says about us as individuals and as a culture. Scrupulously researched and deftly told, this book is an epic journey of the mind.
Recommended by Beth, Powells.com

Review-A-Day

"As a good cookbook sends us straight to the kitchen, or a vivid travel book inspires us to get on a plane, The Age of Wonder, by portraying so many people whose eyes were open to the horror and excitement of the world, urges us to appreciate more keenly the mysteries that surround us." Benjamin Moser, Harper's Magazine (read the entire Harper's review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A riveting history of the men and women whose discoveries and inventions at the end of the 18th century gave birth to the Romantic Age of Science.

When young Joseph Banks stepped onto a Tahitian beach in 1769, he hoped to discover Paradise. Inspired by the scientific ferment sweeping through Britain, the botanist had sailed with Captain Cook on his first Endeavour voyage in search of new worlds. Other voyages of discovery — astronomical, chemical, poetical, philosophical — swiftly follow in Richard Holmes's original evocation of what truly emerges as an Age of Wonder.

Brilliantly conceived as a relay of scientific stories, The Age of Wonder investigates the earliest ideas of deep time and space, and the explorers of dynamic science, of an infinite, mysterious Nature waiting to be discovered. Three lives dominate the book: William Herschel and his sister Caroline, whose dedication to the study of the stars forever changed the public conception of the solar system, the Milky Way, and the meaning of the universe; and Humphry Davy, who, with only a grammar school education stunned the scientific community with his near-suicidal gas experiments that led to the invention of the miners' lamp and established British chemistry as the leading professional science in Europe. This age of exploration extended to great writers and poets as well as scientists, all creators relishing in moments of high exhilaration, boundary-pushing and discovery.

Holmes's extraordinary evocation of this age of wonder shows how great ideas and experiments — both successes and failures — were born of singular and often lonely dedication, and how religious faith and scientific truth collide. He has written a book breathtaking in its originality, its storytelling energy, and its intellectual significance.

Review:

"The Romantic imagination was inspired, not alienated, by scientific advances, argues this captivating history. Holmes, author of a much-admired biography of Coleridge, focuses on prominent British scientists of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, including the astronomer William Herschel and his accomplished assistant and sister, Caroline; Humphrey Davy, a leading chemist and amateur poet; and Joseph Banks, whose journal of a youthful voyage to Tahiti was a study in sexual libertinism. Holmes's biographical approach makes his obsessive protagonists (Davy's self-experimenting with laughing gas is an epic in itself) the prototypes of the Romantic genius absorbed in a Promethean quest for knowledge. Their discoveries, he argues, helped establish a new paradigm of 'Romantic science' that saw the universe as vast, dynamic and full of marvels and celebrated mankind's power to not just describe but transform Nature. Holmes's treatment is sketchy on the actual science and heavy on the cultural impact, with wide-ranging discussions of the 1780s ballooning craze, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and scientific metaphors in Romantic poetry. It's an engrossing portrait of scientists as passionate adventurers, boldly laying claim to the intellectual leadership of society. Illus. (July 14)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"In this big two-hearted river of a book, the twin energies of scientific curiosity and poetic invention pulsate on every page." New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Gives us...a new model for scientific exploration and poetic expression in the Romantic period. Informative and invigorating, generous and beguiling, it is, indeed, wonderful." Guardian

Review:

"The most flat-out fascinating book so far this year.... Holmes' account of experimental science at the end of 1700s is beyond riveting." Time

Review:

"Holmes is certainly the man to undertake this intellectual salvage operation...Ambitious...Eloquent." Wall Street Journal

Review:

"It was a singular time, and this is a singular book." Fortune

Review:

"Fascinating... This beautifully crafted book deserves all the praise it will undoubtedly attract. Well-researched and vividly written, The Age of Wonder will fascinate scientists and poets alike." Literary Review

Review:

"Romanticism and Science are justly reunited in Holmes's new book... A revelation... Thrilling." Independent

Review:

"Exhilarating...Instructive and delightful...Finely observed...Generous and hugely enjoyable." Daily Telegraph

Synopsis:

US

Synopsis:

The Age of Wonder is a colorful and utterly absorbing history of the men and women whose discoveries and inventions at the end of the eighteenth century gave birth to the Romantic Age of Science. 

When young Joseph Banks stepped onto a Tahitian beach in 1769, he hoped to discover Paradise. Inspired by the scientific ferment sweeping through Britain, the botanist had sailed with Captain Cook in search of new worlds. Other voyages of discovery—astronomical, chemical, poetical, philosophical—swiftly follow in Richard Holmes's thrilling evocation of the second scientific revolution. Through the lives of William Herschel and his sister Caroline, who forever changed the public conception of the solar system; of Humphry Davy, whose near-suicidal gas experiments revolutionized chemistry; and of the great Romantic writers, from Mary Shelley to Coleridge and Keats, who were inspired by the scientific breakthroughs of their day, Holmes brings to life the era in which we first realized both the awe-inspiring and the frightening possibilities of science—an era whose consequences are with us still.

About the Author

Richard Holmes is the author of Footsteps: Adventures of a Romantic Biographer; Dr. Johnson & Mr. Savage; Shelley: The Pursuit (for which he received the Somerset Maugham Prize); Coleridge: Early Visions, and Coleridge: Darker Reflections (a New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice, and a National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist). He lives in England.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

skeptijim, September 20, 2011 (view all comments by skeptijim)
I love science history. I love Romantic poetry and literature. This book is how the Romantic period writers and scientists influenced each other. It is the best survey of science history I've read since Bryson's Short History of Nearly Everything. This one delves much deeper into the lives and times of certain scientists and explorers and is a true masterpiece.
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(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400031870
Subtitle:
The Romantic Generation and the Discovery of the Beauty and Terror of Science
Author:
Holmes, Richard
Publisher:
Vintage
Subject:
History
Subject:
Science -- Great Britain -- History.
Subject:
Discoveries in science - Great Britain -
Subject:
History of Science-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Publication Date:
20100302
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
24 PAGES OF COLOR
Pages:
576
Dimensions:
9.24x6.34x1.24 in. 1.68 lbs.

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Related Subjects

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Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Featured Titles in Tech » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 576 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9781400031870 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Richard Holmes's The Age of Wonder is at once a history of Regency-era scientific discovery and a meditation on what the pursuit of science says about us as individuals and as a culture. Scrupulously researched and deftly told, this book is an epic journey of the mind.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The Romantic imagination was inspired, not alienated, by scientific advances, argues this captivating history. Holmes, author of a much-admired biography of Coleridge, focuses on prominent British scientists of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, including the astronomer William Herschel and his accomplished assistant and sister, Caroline; Humphrey Davy, a leading chemist and amateur poet; and Joseph Banks, whose journal of a youthful voyage to Tahiti was a study in sexual libertinism. Holmes's biographical approach makes his obsessive protagonists (Davy's self-experimenting with laughing gas is an epic in itself) the prototypes of the Romantic genius absorbed in a Promethean quest for knowledge. Their discoveries, he argues, helped establish a new paradigm of 'Romantic science' that saw the universe as vast, dynamic and full of marvels and celebrated mankind's power to not just describe but transform Nature. Holmes's treatment is sketchy on the actual science and heavy on the cultural impact, with wide-ranging discussions of the 1780s ballooning craze, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and scientific metaphors in Romantic poetry. It's an engrossing portrait of scientists as passionate adventurers, boldly laying claim to the intellectual leadership of society. Illus. (July 14)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "As a good cookbook sends us straight to the kitchen, or a vivid travel book inspires us to get on a plane, The Age of Wonder, by portraying so many people whose eyes were open to the horror and excitement of the world, urges us to appreciate more keenly the mysteries that surround us." (read the entire Harper's review)
"Review" by , "In this big two-hearted river of a book, the twin energies of scientific curiosity and poetic invention pulsate on every page."
"Review" by , "Gives us...a new model for scientific exploration and poetic expression in the Romantic period. Informative and invigorating, generous and beguiling, it is, indeed, wonderful."
"Review" by , "The most flat-out fascinating book so far this year.... Holmes' account of experimental science at the end of 1700s is beyond riveting."
"Review" by , "Holmes is certainly the man to undertake this intellectual salvage operation...Ambitious...Eloquent."
"Review" by , "It was a singular time, and this is a singular book."
"Review" by , "Fascinating... This beautifully crafted book deserves all the praise it will undoubtedly attract. Well-researched and vividly written, The Age of Wonder will fascinate scientists and poets alike."
"Review" by , "Romanticism and Science are justly reunited in Holmes's new book... A revelation... Thrilling."
"Review" by , "Exhilarating...Instructive and delightful...Finely observed...Generous and hugely enjoyable."
"Synopsis" by , US
"Synopsis" by , The Age of Wonder is a colorful and utterly absorbing history of the men and women whose discoveries and inventions at the end of the eighteenth century gave birth to the Romantic Age of Science. 

When young Joseph Banks stepped onto a Tahitian beach in 1769, he hoped to discover Paradise. Inspired by the scientific ferment sweeping through Britain, the botanist had sailed with Captain Cook in search of new worlds. Other voyages of discovery—astronomical, chemical, poetical, philosophical—swiftly follow in Richard Holmes's thrilling evocation of the second scientific revolution. Through the lives of William Herschel and his sister Caroline, who forever changed the public conception of the solar system; of Humphry Davy, whose near-suicidal gas experiments revolutionized chemistry; and of the great Romantic writers, from Mary Shelley to Coleridge and Keats, who were inspired by the scientific breakthroughs of their day, Holmes brings to life the era in which we first realized both the awe-inspiring and the frightening possibilities of science—an era whose consequences are with us still.

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