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This title in other editions

And Now You Can Go: A Novel

by

And Now You Can Go: A Novel Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Vendela Vida's fearless, critically acclaimed fiction debut follows the unpredictable recovery of a young woman as she tries to make sense of her life after an encounter at gunpoint.

Accosted one afternoon in Riverside Park by a man who doesn't want to die alone, Ellis, a young grad student, talks her way out of the situation by reciting poetry to her desperate captor. He lets her go, but is she free? Rejecting the overtures of her kind-hearted boyfriend, the police, and the suitors who would like to save her, Ellis finds herself unable to escape the event. She leaves the city to visit her family; joins her mother on a medical mission to the Philippines. When she returns, Ellis discovers something more about life — perhaps even how to take back her own.

Review:

"It's a good thing Vida makes her fiction debut with this novel instead of a story collection: she takes getting used to, but it's worthwhile....Hilarious and touching, icily removed, yet bracingly real." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"The end, unfortunately, arrives just as the book began — abruptly — and the reader longs for something more. Nevertheless, this remains an intriguing and auspicious debut." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Steeped in her wild cynicism, [Ellis] also finds the grace to reach beyond herself, and that surprising combination is what makes this first novel unforgettable." Hazel Rochman, Booklist

Review:

"Vida's blessedly economical first novel, And Now You Can Go, is...written by a woman who's cleareyed enough to see around and beyond her own heroine." Stephanie Zacharek, The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"There's plenty of mordant humor...and oddball characters who leave Post-It notes in verse or profess devotion by pushing tacks into their faces, but, even as a study in dislocation, Ellis's trajectory seems somewhat arbitrary." The New Yorker

Review:

"As Ellis gradually returns to life, her unadorned narration is honest, quirky, and surprisingly compelling." Emily Mead, Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"At fewer than 200 pages, And Now You Can Go has more of the tease of the novella than the satisfying whump of the novel. Vida's next project could well be more ambitious — she has earned it." Ruth Franklin, The Washington Post

Review:

"The novel is an impressive accomplishment. Ellis' voice completely convinces and enthralls, making And Now You Can Go succeed in a way few narrative-driven novels can." Erik Henriksen, The Portland Mercury

Review:

"Subtle and psychologically acute, And Now You Can Go is a story that captures the way life resists being turned into neat narrative." Michelle Goldberg, Newsday

Review:

"Vida... creates a complex but sympathetic heroine on a voyage and entices you to follow." Clea Simon, The Boston Phoenix

Review:

"Richly drawn, unpredictable, and wryly funny, Vida's debut is dazzling. Manhattan — both people and place — are rendered with rare authenticity. Highly recommended..." Library Journal

Review:

"Vida demonstrates tremendous patience, sensitivity and droll humor as she charts the path traveled by her memorably odd hero, from paralytic bewilderment to a credible level of self-discovery and resolution." Chicago Tribune

Review:

"In addition to its stirring plot and narrator, Vida's novel offers smart, solid, gimmickless prose that shifts deftly according to scene." Thomas Haley, Minneapolis Star Tribune

Review:

"The book succeeds as a captivating character study with surprising pockets of wit, and Vida's novel is well worth reading....Vida has a brilliant eye for the idiosyncrasies and peculiar details that endear her characters to the reader." Cleveland Plain Dealer

Review:

"Lots of colors, all the needlework very fine, but no patch is necessarily connected to any other....The book is even typeset as vignettes: a few paragraphs, then white space, a page or two, white space, so on." Detroit Free Press

Review:

"[A] short, fastidious novel...stingy with ornament, humor, even polysyllables....This affectless style may be perfectly appropriate to her circumstances, but it can make for some fairly trying company." San Francisco Chronicle

Review:

"Vendela Vida's novel is a gift to the reader, a story that contains what I love best about fiction: an idiosyncratic voice, keenly observed gestures, intelligence and heart, and both large and small moments that reverberate in unpredictable ways." Amy Tan, author of The Bonesetter's Daughter

Review:

"And Now You Can Go's narrator is a cool customer, drifting through a world of violence and charity and screwed-up suitors. But she's ever ready to do something generous, something noble, something stamped with grace." David Schickler, author of Kissing in Manhattan

Review:

"And Now You Can Go is so fast, so mesmerizing to read, and so accomplished that it's hard to think of it as a first novel, which it is — Vendela Vida has promise to spare." Joan Didion

Review:

"An existential Perils-of-Pauline: A young woman is robbed — at gun point! — of her ability to feel. Whether or not she can learn anew how to love is the question at the heart of this wonderful new novel. Comedic yet serious, minimalist yet lush — this is an exciting debut." Jonathan Ames, author of The Extra Man

Review:

"Vendela Vida's first novel defies expectations in virtually every way; what looks be a tale of psychological trauma, or even revenge, evolves into something much rarer in contemporary fiction: a joyful investigation of the pleasures of living. And Now You Can Go is beguiling, celebratory, and faintly mysterious." Jennifer Egan

Synopsis:

This sharply humorous and fast-paced debut novel is about the effects — some predictable, some wildly unexpected — that an encounter at gunpoint have on a (previously) assured young woman.

About the Author

Vendela Vida's first book, Girls on the Verge, grew out of her M.F.A. thesis at Columbia University. She is co-editor of The Believer magazine, and lives in Northern California with her husband. This is her first novel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Patrick Simpson, September 23, 2007 (view all comments by Patrick Simpson)
This little novel has an interesting story arch; it begins big and morphs into an MTV/talking-with-a-friend pace the rest of the way. As the protagonist tries to make sense of her life after she was taken right to the brink of a woman's worst nightmare, I could not help but root for her. So many people try to care about her, but not so much that they forget their own narcissism. This rebuilding of a soul one tiny stone at a time is a small story, well worth the read for the warmth and familiarity this writer brings to its pages.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(13 of 19 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781400032419
Author:
Vida, Vendela
Publisher:
Anchor Books
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Young women
Subject:
Nurses
Subject:
Mothers and daughters
Subject:
Domestic fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Number:
Reprint ed.
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
September 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
8.04x5.24x.56 in. .49 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

And Now You Can Go: A Novel Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$4.50 In Stock
Product details 208 pages Anchor Books/Doubleday - English 9781400032419 Reviews:
"Review" by , "It's a good thing Vida makes her fiction debut with this novel instead of a story collection: she takes getting used to, but it's worthwhile....Hilarious and touching, icily removed, yet bracingly real."
"Review" by , "The end, unfortunately, arrives just as the book began — abruptly — and the reader longs for something more. Nevertheless, this remains an intriguing and auspicious debut."
"Review" by , "Steeped in her wild cynicism, [Ellis] also finds the grace to reach beyond herself, and that surprising combination is what makes this first novel unforgettable."
"Review" by , "Vida's blessedly economical first novel, And Now You Can Go, is...written by a woman who's cleareyed enough to see around and beyond her own heroine."
"Review" by , "There's plenty of mordant humor...and oddball characters who leave Post-It notes in verse or profess devotion by pushing tacks into their faces, but, even as a study in dislocation, Ellis's trajectory seems somewhat arbitrary."
"Review" by , "As Ellis gradually returns to life, her unadorned narration is honest, quirky, and surprisingly compelling."
"Review" by , "At fewer than 200 pages, And Now You Can Go has more of the tease of the novella than the satisfying whump of the novel. Vida's next project could well be more ambitious — she has earned it."
"Review" by , "The novel is an impressive accomplishment. Ellis' voice completely convinces and enthralls, making And Now You Can Go succeed in a way few narrative-driven novels can."
"Review" by , "Subtle and psychologically acute, And Now You Can Go is a story that captures the way life resists being turned into neat narrative."
"Review" by , "Vida... creates a complex but sympathetic heroine on a voyage and entices you to follow."
"Review" by , "Richly drawn, unpredictable, and wryly funny, Vida's debut is dazzling. Manhattan — both people and place — are rendered with rare authenticity. Highly recommended..."
"Review" by , "Vida demonstrates tremendous patience, sensitivity and droll humor as she charts the path traveled by her memorably odd hero, from paralytic bewilderment to a credible level of self-discovery and resolution."
"Review" by , "In addition to its stirring plot and narrator, Vida's novel offers smart, solid, gimmickless prose that shifts deftly according to scene."
"Review" by , "The book succeeds as a captivating character study with surprising pockets of wit, and Vida's novel is well worth reading....Vida has a brilliant eye for the idiosyncrasies and peculiar details that endear her characters to the reader."
"Review" by , "Lots of colors, all the needlework very fine, but no patch is necessarily connected to any other....The book is even typeset as vignettes: a few paragraphs, then white space, a page or two, white space, so on."
"Review" by , "[A] short, fastidious novel...stingy with ornament, humor, even polysyllables....This affectless style may be perfectly appropriate to her circumstances, but it can make for some fairly trying company."
"Review" by , "Vendela Vida's novel is a gift to the reader, a story that contains what I love best about fiction: an idiosyncratic voice, keenly observed gestures, intelligence and heart, and both large and small moments that reverberate in unpredictable ways."
"Review" by , "And Now You Can Go's narrator is a cool customer, drifting through a world of violence and charity and screwed-up suitors. But she's ever ready to do something generous, something noble, something stamped with grace."
"Review" by , "And Now You Can Go is so fast, so mesmerizing to read, and so accomplished that it's hard to think of it as a first novel, which it is — Vendela Vida has promise to spare."
"Review" by , "An existential Perils-of-Pauline: A young woman is robbed — at gun point! — of her ability to feel. Whether or not she can learn anew how to love is the question at the heart of this wonderful new novel. Comedic yet serious, minimalist yet lush — this is an exciting debut."
"Review" by , "Vendela Vida's first novel defies expectations in virtually every way; what looks be a tale of psychological trauma, or even revenge, evolves into something much rarer in contemporary fiction: a joyful investigation of the pleasures of living. And Now You Can Go is beguiling, celebratory, and faintly mysterious."
"Synopsis" by , This sharply humorous and fast-paced debut novel is about the effects — some predictable, some wildly unexpected — that an encounter at gunpoint have on a (previously) assured young woman.
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