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The Feminine Mistake: Are We Giving Up Too Much?

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The Feminine Mistake: Are We Giving Up Too Much? Cover

ISBN13: 9781401303068
ISBN10: 1401303064
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Women are constantly being told that it's simply too difficult to balance work and family, so if they don't really "have to" work, it's better for their families if they stay home. Not only is this untrue, Leslie Bennetts says, but the arguments in favor of stay-at-home motherhood fail to consider the surprising benefits of work and the unexpected toll of giving it up. It's time, she says, to get the message across — combining work and family really is the best choice for most women, and it's eminently doable.

Bennetts and millions of other working women provide ample proof that there are many different ways to have kids, maintain a challenging career, and have a richly rewarding life as a result. Earning money and being successful not only make women feel great, but when women sacrifice their financial autonomy by quitting their jobs, they become vulnerable to divorce as well as the potential illness, death, or unemployment of their breadwinner husbands. Further, they forfeit the intellectual, emotional, psychological, and even medical benefits of self-sufficiency.

The truth is that when women gamble on dependancy, most eventually end up on the wrong side of the odds. In riveting interviews with women from a wide range of backgrounds, Bennetts tells their dramatic stories — some triumphant, others heartbreaking.

The Feminine Mistake will inspire women to accept the challenge of figuring out who they are and what they want to do with their lives in addition to raising children. Not since Betty Friedan has anyone offered such an eye-opening and persuasive argument for why women can — and should — embrace the joyously complex lives they deserve.

Review:

"It would be easy to dismiss this as yet another salvo in the mommy wars- — the debate over women opting out of careers to be stay-at-home moms. But Bennetts, a longtime journalist and writer for Vanity Fair, is more interested in investigating what she sees as the heart of the matter: economics. Through impressive research and interviews with experts and with real women, Bennetts shows that women simply cannot afford to quit their day jobs. Long-term loss of income has a cascading impact in areas such as medical benefits and retirement funds, not to mention a woman's sense of autonomy, derived from financial independence. Further, a career supplies a woman with a measure of security for herself and her children in the event of unexpected sickness or divorce. As any woman who has tried knows, returning to the workforce and finding a well-paying job after an absence of years, or even decades, is difficult. Not so long ago mothers would pin a dollar bill to their daughters' underclothes when they went out on a date in case, for some reason, they needed carfare home. Those mothers knew all to well that without money of your own it's easy to be left stranded. As Bennetts expertly shows, it's still true." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A pregnant friend once asked me why all the mothers she knew seemed so angry. 'Lack of sleep and time,' I shrugged. But that's not the reason, or not entirely. New mothers, or at least some, are angry because for the first time they've come up hard against the fundamental inequity between men and women. The biological differences — excruciating childbirth, endless late-night nursing — are stark... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Allowing women to tell their own stories of economic abandonment, Bennetts presents a cautionary tale for women pondering giving up economic independence." Vanessa Bush, Booklist

Review:

"It has a swift, urgent passion that makes it a real page-turner, and the message is of huge importance." Tina Brown

Review:

"Leslie Bennets delivers an incontrovertible argument for economic self-sufficiency as the fundament of women's well-being." Susan Faludi

Review:

"Packed with pragmatic, well-researched advice, this manifesto on the power of financial independence is bound to inspire discussion among career women as well as stay-at-home moms." USA Today

Review:

"Leslie Bennetts' powerful book should be a wake-up call for women of every generation. No woman could possibly confuse care and cash again after reading about the true price women pay for economic dependence." Liz Perle, author of Money, a Memoir

Synopsis:

Renowned Vanity Fair journalist Bennetts electrifies the debate over women's life choices with a riveting new book that completely redefines the work-family question. She offers a persuasive argument for why women can — and should — make more than one kind of mark on the world.

About the Author

Leslie Bennetts has been a contributing writer at Vanity Fair since 1988, writing on subjects that have ranged from movie stars to U.S. anit-terrorism policy. Before joining that magazine, she was the first woman ever to cover a presidential campaign for the New York Times. Bennetts lives in New York City with her husband and their two children.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

gabelle83, May 3, 2007 (view all comments by gabelle83)
Leslie Bennetts is a talented writer. The book is quite interesting. I would recommend it. However, be prepared! Ms. Bennetts has complained that her most ardent critics have not even read the book. Frankly, that could be a blessing. I think they would go from being angry about what they think the book says to enraged about what it really says. Ms. Bennetts maintains that her book is to point out the financial risk that women may not realize they are taking when they decide to give up paid work. She does tell a number of sob stories about mostly upper class women in the northeast whose husbands have divorced them, gotten sick and couldn?t work or other tragedies that put them in desperate financial shape. But it is clear that is not the real agenda. The author has an open disdain for stay at home mothers and homemakers. The comment she makes in reference to Simone de Beauvoir?s 1949 book, The Second Sex, seems to sum up the feelings she espouses in the rest of the book. On page 228 Ms. Bennetts writes, ?Today?s stay at home wives would doubtless recoil at de Beauvoir's description of them as parasites, but it is hard to argue with the fundamental truth of that characterization. When women don?t work they must rely on men to support them. Needless to say, parasites are dependent upon their host for survival. This fact alone is sufficient to belie the current vogue among stay at home wives for pretending they have equal power in their marriages.?
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781401303068
Subtitle:
Are We Giving Up Too Much?
Author:
Bennetts, Leslie
Publisher:
Hachette Books
Subject:
General
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Women & Business
Subject:
Feminism & Feminist Theory
Subject:
Feminism
Subject:
Labor & Industrial Relations - General
Subject:
General Business & Economics
Subject:
Sex role -- Economic aspects.
Subject:
General-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20080304
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 8 up to 17
Language:
English
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in 24.56 oz
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects


History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » General
History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » Work
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family

The Feminine Mistake: Are We Giving Up Too Much? Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$8.95 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Voice - English 9781401303068 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "It would be easy to dismiss this as yet another salvo in the mommy wars- — the debate over women opting out of careers to be stay-at-home moms. But Bennetts, a longtime journalist and writer for Vanity Fair, is more interested in investigating what she sees as the heart of the matter: economics. Through impressive research and interviews with experts and with real women, Bennetts shows that women simply cannot afford to quit their day jobs. Long-term loss of income has a cascading impact in areas such as medical benefits and retirement funds, not to mention a woman's sense of autonomy, derived from financial independence. Further, a career supplies a woman with a measure of security for herself and her children in the event of unexpected sickness or divorce. As any woman who has tried knows, returning to the workforce and finding a well-paying job after an absence of years, or even decades, is difficult. Not so long ago mothers would pin a dollar bill to their daughters' underclothes when they went out on a date in case, for some reason, they needed carfare home. Those mothers knew all to well that without money of your own it's easy to be left stranded. As Bennetts expertly shows, it's still true." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Allowing women to tell their own stories of economic abandonment, Bennetts presents a cautionary tale for women pondering giving up economic independence."
"Review" by , "It has a swift, urgent passion that makes it a real page-turner, and the message is of huge importance."
"Review" by , "Leslie Bennets delivers an incontrovertible argument for economic self-sufficiency as the fundament of women's well-being."
"Review" by , "Packed with pragmatic, well-researched advice, this manifesto on the power of financial independence is bound to inspire discussion among career women as well as stay-at-home moms."
"Review" by , "Leslie Bennetts' powerful book should be a wake-up call for women of every generation. No woman could possibly confuse care and cash again after reading about the true price women pay for economic dependence."
"Synopsis" by , Renowned Vanity Fair journalist Bennetts electrifies the debate over women's life choices with a riveting new book that completely redefines the work-family question. She offers a persuasive argument for why women can — and should — make more than one kind of mark on the world.
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