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1 Beaverton Cooking and Food- Gastronomic Literature

A Tiger in the Kitchen: A Memoir of Food and Family

by

A Tiger in the Kitchen: A Memoir of Food and Family Cover

ISBN13: 9781401341282
ISBN10: 1401341284
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

After growing up in the most food-obsessed city in the world, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan left home and family at eighteen for America — proof of the rebelliousness of daughters born in the Year of the Tiger. But as a thirty-something fashion writer in New York, she felt the Singaporean dishes that defined her childhood beginning to call her back. Was it too late to learn the secrets of her grandmothers’ and aunties’ kitchens, as well as the tumultuous family history that had kept them hidden before? In her quest to recreate the dishes of her native Singapore by cooking with her family, Tan learned not only cherished recipes but long-buried stories of past generations.

A Tiger in the Kitchen, which includes ten authentic recipes for Singaporean classics such as pineapple tarts and Teochew braised duck, is the charming, beautifully written story of a Chinese-Singaporean ex-pat who learns to infuse her New York lifestyle with the rich lessons of the Singaporean kitchen, ultimately reconnecting with her family and herself.

Review:

"Written in the tradition of two classic but different memoirs, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior (1976) and Julie Powell's Julie & Julia (2005), the book is a recipe in itself — a dash of conjuring the ancient stories of one's past, a sprinkling of culinary narrative. The result is a literary treat....A delightful take on the relationship between food, family and tradition." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"Her prose is breezy, and her descriptions of duck soup and pineapple tarts entice. But the meat in this memoir is what Tan learns about her resilient family, whose members come together both to cook and to heal." People magazine

Review:

"This memoir is less controversial, more inspirational than Amy Chua's fiery book on Chinese parenting....Tan's tiger qualities reveal themselves in her fierce determination to draw her past into her present, to slow down, to learn how to make the food of her childhood." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"Tan's A Tiger in the Kitchen is reminiscent of Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love, yet the author's determination to master her grandmothers' and aunts’ recipes also echoes the triumphs and struggles in Julie Powell’s Julie & Julia. Above all, A Tiger in the Kitchen is a tale of reconnecting with family and tradition — with the fried rice and flaky pineapple tarts that define Singaporean culture — and of food's sensorial power to connect us to our pasts." The Daily Beast

Synopsis:

“Starting with charred fried rice and ending with flaky pineapple tarts, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan takes us along on a personal journey that most can only fantasize about—an exploration of family history and culture through a mastery of home-cooked dishes. Tan’s delectable education through the landscape of Singaporean cuisine teaches us that food is the tie that binds.”

—Jennifer 8. Lee, author of The Fortune Cookie Chronicles

After growing up in the most food-obsessed city in the world, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan left home and family at eighteen for America—proof of the rebelliousness of daughters born in the Year of the Tiger. But as a thirtysomething fashion writer in New York, she felt the Singaporean dishes that defined her childhood beginning to call her back. Was it too late to learn the secrets of her grandmothers’ and aunties’ kitchens, as well as the tumultuous family history that had kept them hidden before In her quest to recreate the dishes of her native Singapore by cooking with her family, Tan learned not only cherished recipes but long-buried stories of past generations.

A Tiger in the Kitchen, which includes ten authentic recipes for Singaporean classics such as pineapple tarts and Teochew braised duck, is the charming, beautifully written story of a Chinese-Singaporean ex-pat who learns to infuse her New York lifestyle with the rich lessons of the Singaporean kitchen, ultimately reconnecting with her family and herself.

Reading Group Guide available online and included in the eBook.

“Cheryl Tan, a Tiger in the Kitchen, keeps coming back to Singapore in pursuit of the haunting flavors of childhood meals and finds a part of herself she didn’t know existed in the kitchens of her loving aunties.” —Gael Greene, InsatiableCritic.com

“How does a NYC fashion journalist find herself in Singapore tackling 3000 pineapple tarts, rice dumplings, and other Teochew dishes? Along with the author, we discover the secrets of a culture through the language of the kitchen in this ultimate cure for culinary homesickness.”

—Kim SunÉe, author of Trail of Crumbs

About the Author

Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan is a New York-based writer who has written a memoir about discovering her Singaporean family by learning to cook with them. She was a staff writer at the Wall Street Journal, In Style magazine and the Baltimore Sun. Her stories have also appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Marie Claire, Every Day With Rachael Ray, Family Circle, Bloomberg Businessweek, Chicago Tribune, The (Portland) Oregonian, The (Topeka) Capital-Journal, The (Singapore) Straits Times and Elle.com. She is also a regular contributor to The Atlantic Food Channel.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Barbmoe, July 21, 2011 (view all comments by Barbmoe)
This was a delightful book. My daughter recommended it to me and she was right. I loved it! Cheryl Tan takes us on a wonderful adventure of sights, sounds, taste and smell through her family culture and cooking in Singapore. She left home to go to college in the USA and eventually came to realize she needed to do more than cook Ramen Noodles. Cheryl made a journey back home to Singapore to learn to cook her family's recipes. She found a lot more than just recipes and how to cook. She found family and connection. By the time I was part way through the book, I was longing for some good Singaporean food. An easy read and a satisfying one.
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(1 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)
Denise Morland, March 1, 2011 (view all comments by Denise Morland)
This is an inspiring, funny, and hunger-inducing memoir about a young woman who goes back to her Singaporean roots and begs her Aunties to teach her to cook. Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan, a feisty, intelligent, and rebellious Chinese girl, grew up with more freedom and independence then most young Chinese women. She left Singapore for college in the US at age 18 and was quickly westernized in her views and beliefs. At 30 years old she finds herself jobless in New York, increasingly out of touch with her Chinese family, and wishing she knew how to cook, a skill she scorned as a child despite growing up with a host of Aunties who were especially skilled. She begins making trips home to learn the dishes of her childhood and, naturally, learns a whole lot more in the process.

Lovely book! To start with the food descriptions are fantastic. I can just smell the thick pineapple jam simmering and the braised duck sizzling in the wok. The writing is clean and fresh, not an imitation of one the many popular food writers, but uniquely her own. Her various family members are portrayed with love and humor. Cheryl talks about the highs and lows of learning how to create delicious food with such honesty and clarity that I kept finding myself nodding along. I remember so well what it feels like to slave all weekend over a project that ultimately fails or to whip up a miracle that people can't stop eating. A Tiger in the Kitchen is a charming book that anyone who takes pleasure in cooking will appreciate.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781401341282
Author:
Tan, Cheryl Lu-lien
Publisher:
Voice
Author:
Tan, Cheryl Lu-Lien
Author:
Tan, Cheryl
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Biography-Women
Edition Description:
TradePB
Publication Date:
20110231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
8 x 5.1875 in 8.64 oz
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Biography » Women
Cooking and Food » Food Writing » Gastronomic Literature
Cooking and Food » Food Writing » General
Cooking and Food » General
Cooking and Food » Regional and Ethnic » Oceania

A Tiger in the Kitchen: A Memoir of Food and Family Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Hyperion - English 9781401341282 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Written in the tradition of two classic but different memoirs, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior (1976) and Julie Powell's Julie & Julia (2005), the book is a recipe in itself — a dash of conjuring the ancient stories of one's past, a sprinkling of culinary narrative. The result is a literary treat....A delightful take on the relationship between food, family and tradition."
"Review" by , "Her prose is breezy, and her descriptions of duck soup and pineapple tarts entice. But the meat in this memoir is what Tan learns about her resilient family, whose members come together both to cook and to heal."
"Review" by , "This memoir is less controversial, more inspirational than Amy Chua's fiery book on Chinese parenting....Tan's tiger qualities reveal themselves in her fierce determination to draw her past into her present, to slow down, to learn how to make the food of her childhood."
"Review" by , "Tan's A Tiger in the Kitchen is reminiscent of Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love, yet the author's determination to master her grandmothers' and aunts’ recipes also echoes the triumphs and struggles in Julie Powell’s Julie & Julia. Above all, A Tiger in the Kitchen is a tale of reconnecting with family and tradition — with the fried rice and flaky pineapple tarts that define Singaporean culture — and of food's sensorial power to connect us to our pasts."
"Synopsis" by ,

“Starting with charred fried rice and ending with flaky pineapple tarts, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan takes us along on a personal journey that most can only fantasize about—an exploration of family history and culture through a mastery of home-cooked dishes. Tan’s delectable education through the landscape of Singaporean cuisine teaches us that food is the tie that binds.”

—Jennifer 8. Lee, author of The Fortune Cookie Chronicles

After growing up in the most food-obsessed city in the world, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan left home and family at eighteen for America—proof of the rebelliousness of daughters born in the Year of the Tiger. But as a thirtysomething fashion writer in New York, she felt the Singaporean dishes that defined her childhood beginning to call her back. Was it too late to learn the secrets of her grandmothers’ and aunties’ kitchens, as well as the tumultuous family history that had kept them hidden before In her quest to recreate the dishes of her native Singapore by cooking with her family, Tan learned not only cherished recipes but long-buried stories of past generations.

A Tiger in the Kitchen, which includes ten authentic recipes for Singaporean classics such as pineapple tarts and Teochew braised duck, is the charming, beautifully written story of a Chinese-Singaporean ex-pat who learns to infuse her New York lifestyle with the rich lessons of the Singaporean kitchen, ultimately reconnecting with her family and herself.

Reading Group Guide available online and included in the eBook.

“Cheryl Tan, a Tiger in the Kitchen, keeps coming back to Singapore in pursuit of the haunting flavors of childhood meals and finds a part of herself she didn’t know existed in the kitchens of her loving aunties.” —Gael Greene, InsatiableCritic.com

“How does a NYC fashion journalist find herself in Singapore tackling 3000 pineapple tarts, rice dumplings, and other Teochew dishes? Along with the author, we discover the secrets of a culture through the language of the kitchen in this ultimate cure for culinary homesickness.”

—Kim SunÉe, author of Trail of Crumbs

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