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Here's Looking at Euclid: A Surprising Excursion Through the Astonishing World of Math

Here's Looking at Euclid: A Surprising Excursion Through the Astonishing World of Math Cover

ISBN13: 9781416588252
ISBN10: 1416588256
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Too often math gets a bad rap, characterized as dry and difficult. But, Alex Bellos says, "math can be inspiring and brilliantly creative. Mathematical thought is one of the great achievements of the human race, and arguably the foundation of all human progress. The world of mathematics is a remarkable place."andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Bellos has traveled all around the globe and has plunged into history to uncover fascinating stories of mathematical achievement, from the breakthroughs of Euclid, the greatest mathematician of all time, to the creations of the Zen master of origami, one of the hottest areas of mathematical work today. Taking us into the wilds of the Amazon, he tells the story of a tribe there who can count only to five and reports on the latest findings about the math instinctand#8212;including the revelation that ants can actually count how many steps theyand#8217;ve taken. Journeying to the Bay of Bengal, he interviews a Hindu sage about the brilliant mathematical insights of the Buddha, while in Japan he visits the godfather of Sudoku and introduces the brainteasing delights of mathematical games.andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Exploring the mysteries of randomness, he explains why it is impossible for our iPods to truly randomly select songs. In probing the many intrigues of that most beloved of numbers, pi, he visits with two brothers so obsessed with the elusive number that they built a supercomputer in their Manhattan apartment to study it. Throughout, the journey is enhanced with a wealth of intriguing illustrations, such as of the clever puzzles known as tangrams and the crochet creation of an American math professor who suddenly realized one day that she could knit a representation of higher dimensional space that no one had been able to visualize. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Whether writing about how algebra solved Swedish traffic problems, visiting the Mental Calculation World Cup to disclose the secrets of lightning calculation, or exploring the links between pineapples and beautiful teeth, Bellos is a wonderfully engaging guide who never fails to delight even as he edifies. andlt;Iandgt;Hereand#8217;s Looking at Euclid andlt;/Iandgt;is a rare gem that brings the beauty of math to life.

Review:

"Unlike in a traditional classroom setting, Bellos's book aims to reintroduce readers into the world of math by wandering off the beaten algebraic path and investigating interesting topics. Bellos, a former international newspaper correspondent, jets off to exotic places to talk to people about mathematical concepts that catch his fancy. Readers learn the remarkable story of how Sudoku became an overnight international sensation only after its developer, a retired judge, worked for six years on a computer program to write the puzzles. In Japan he visits a club whose school-age members can almost instantaneously add up a string of three-digit numbers by visualizing an abacus in their heads. When in America, Bellos finds himself in Nevada, exploring Reno's casino scene with a discussion of why some gamblers win, but most don't. Adult math buffs will be familiar with most of Bellos's discoveries, but his enthusiasm and lively writing-along with helpful charts and graphics-should inspire younger readers to make their own journeys of mathematical exploration." Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Synopsis:

An excursion through the world of math that brings readers the joy and beautyof the mathematical way of thinking vividly to life.

About the Author

Alex Bellosandlt;b andgt; andlt;/bandgt;has a degree in mathematics from Oxford University and is a freelance writer and regular contributor to the BBCand#8217;s andlt;i andgt;Newsnightandlt;/iandgt; program. He lives in London, UK.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Heather Sturgill, August 6, 2012 (view all comments by Heather Sturgill)
A wonderfully accessible book about mathematics. You don't need to have a degree in mathematics to enjoy this book, but neither will you be bored if you do. It is a very interesting look at how knowledge and development of mathematics has occurred throughout civilization.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781416588252
Publisher:
Free Press
Subject:
General
Author:
Bellos, Alex
Subject:
General Mathematics
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Numeracy.
Subject:
Number concept
Subject:
Arithmetic
Subject:
Mathematics - General
Subject:
Number Theory
Subject:
here s looking at euclid, books on mathematics, here s looking at euclid book, alex bellos, mathematics
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20100631
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
40 b-w line drawings-charts
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects


Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » General
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » History
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » Popular Surveys and Recreational

Here's Looking at Euclid: A Surprising Excursion Through the Astonishing World of Math
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 336 pages Free Press - English 9781416588252 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Unlike in a traditional classroom setting, Bellos's book aims to reintroduce readers into the world of math by wandering off the beaten algebraic path and investigating interesting topics. Bellos, a former international newspaper correspondent, jets off to exotic places to talk to people about mathematical concepts that catch his fancy. Readers learn the remarkable story of how Sudoku became an overnight international sensation only after its developer, a retired judge, worked for six years on a computer program to write the puzzles. In Japan he visits a club whose school-age members can almost instantaneously add up a string of three-digit numbers by visualizing an abacus in their heads. When in America, Bellos finds himself in Nevada, exploring Reno's casino scene with a discussion of why some gamblers win, but most don't. Adult math buffs will be familiar with most of Bellos's discoveries, but his enthusiasm and lively writing-along with helpful charts and graphics-should inspire younger readers to make their own journeys of mathematical exploration." Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Synopsis" by , An excursion through the world of math that brings readers the joy and beautyof the mathematical way of thinking vividly to life.
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