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1 Beaverton Travel Writing- Exploration

Round about the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit

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Round about the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Bandgt;In this first full history of around-the-world travel, Joyce E. Chaplin brilliantly tells the story of circumnavigation. Round About the Earth is a witty, erudite, and colorful account of the outrageous ambitions that have inspired men and women to circle the entire planet.andlt;/Bandgt; andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;For almost five hundred years, human beings have been finding ways to circle the Earthand#8212;by sail, steam, or liquid fuel; by cycling, driving, flying, going into orbit, even by using their own bodily power. The story begins with the first centuries of circumnavigation, when few survived the attempt: in 1519, Ferdinand Magellan left Spain with five ships and 270 men, but only one ship and thirty-five men returned, not including Magellan, who died in the Philippines. Starting with these dangerous voyages, Joyce Chaplin takes us on a trip of our own as we travel with Francis Drake, William Dampier, Louis-Antoine de Bougainville, and James Cook. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Eventually sea travel grew much safer and passengers came on board. The most famous was Charles Darwin, but some intrepid women became circumnavigators tooand#8212;a Lady Brassey, for example. Circumnavigation became a fad, as captured in Jules Verneand#8217;s classic novel, andlt;Iandgt;Around the World in Eighty Daysandlt;/Iandgt;. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Once continental railroads were built, circumnavigators could traverse sea and land. Newspapers sponsored racing contests, and people sought ways to distinguish themselvesand#8212;by bicycling around the world, for instance, or by sailing solo. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Steamships turned round-the-world travel into a luxurious experience, as with the tours of Thomas Cook andamp; Son. Famous authors wrote up their adventures, including Mark Twain and Jack London and Elizabeth Jane Cochrane (better known as Nellie Bly). Finally humans took to the skies to circle the globe in airplanes. Not much later, Sputnik, Gagarin, and Glenn pioneered a new kind of circumnavigationand#8212; in orbit. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;Through it all, the desire to take on the planet has tested the courage and capacity of the bold men and women who took up the challenge. Their exploits show us why we think of the Earth as home. andlt;Iandgt;Round About the Earth andlt;/Iandgt;is itself a thrilling adventure.

Review:

"Hardship, frolic, barnstorming, and spiritual enigma shape this scintillating history of round-the-world travel. Harvard historian Chaplin (The First Scientific American: Benjamin Franklin and the Pursuit of Genius) traces evolving styles of circumnavigation from the Age of Sail's epics of scurvy and shipwreck through the chic, precisely scheduled luxury-liner tourism of the late British Empire to modern times, when globe-trotting on everything from bicycles to airplanes and space capsules could be an exercise in long-distance banality, a political statement, or a solo voyage of self-discovery. Along the way she lucidly explains the innovations and soggy pitfalls of developing transport technologies, explores the cultural meanings — her exegesis of Jules Verne's Around the World in Eighty Days is a gem — and outlines the human experience of circumnavigation; one constant, she notes, is the need for reassuring companionship, whether pets or local navigators kidnapped to point the sea routes forward. The book's heart is its profusion of entertaining travel picaresques with their gallery of colorful figures on grand, eccentric, or piratical quests. These anecdotes are so many and so repetitive that the text occasionally feels like it's going in circles, but Chaplin is such a charming, perceptive raconteur that we're happy to drift in the eddies of her prose. Photos, 4 maps. Agent: Andrew Wylie, the Wylie Agency. (Nov. 13)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

With illustrations and maps, a witty and erudite account of the history of circumnavigation and how it has influenced the way we think about the Earth and ourselves. In the first complete account, Joyce Chaplin tells of the outrageous ambitions that inspired men and women to take on the whole planet.

For the past 500 years, human beings have been finding ways to circle the Earth—by sail, steam, or overland; by flying, going into orbit; walking and by cycling.

     Chaplin begins her account in the first centuries of circumnavigation, when few survived the attempt. We meet an array of bold figures who forged the way forward: from Ferdinand Magellan, Francis Drake, and James Cook, through the fictional Phileas Fogg, who did it in eighty days, on to those who vied for titles and records and prizes for being first at something. Circling the globe became a popular sport through momentous innovations—first the railroad (on land), the steamship (luxury), the airplane (speed), and ultimately spacecraft (otherworldly).

     Joyce Chaplin’s exciting narrative brings alive the stories of the “globestruck.” From whatever distance, however far, what they had and have in common is the fierce desire to return to earth.

About the Author

andlt;Bandgt;Joyce E. Chaplinandlt;/Bandgt; is the James Duncan Phillips Professor of History at Harvard University. She is the author of four previous books of nonfiction, including andlt;iandgt;The First Scientific American: Benjamin Franklin and the Pursuit of Geniusandlt;/iandgt; (2006), a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (Science and Technology Category), and winner of the Annibel Jenkins Prize of American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781416596196
Subtitle:
Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit
Author:
Chaplin, Joyce E
Author:
Chaplin, Joyce E.
Publisher:
Simon and Schuster
Subject:
World History-General
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20121030
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 16-pp b-w insert; 4 two-page map sprea
Pages:
560
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.12 in

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » History and Social Science
History and Social Science » Exploration » General
History and Social Science » Geography » General
History and Social Science » Sale Books
History and Social Science » World History » General
Travel » Travel Writing » Exploration
Travel » Travel Writing » General

Round about the Earth: Circumnavigation from Magellan to Orbit Used Hardcover
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Product details 560 pages Simon & Schuster - English 9781416596196 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Hardship, frolic, barnstorming, and spiritual enigma shape this scintillating history of round-the-world travel. Harvard historian Chaplin (The First Scientific American: Benjamin Franklin and the Pursuit of Genius) traces evolving styles of circumnavigation from the Age of Sail's epics of scurvy and shipwreck through the chic, precisely scheduled luxury-liner tourism of the late British Empire to modern times, when globe-trotting on everything from bicycles to airplanes and space capsules could be an exercise in long-distance banality, a political statement, or a solo voyage of self-discovery. Along the way she lucidly explains the innovations and soggy pitfalls of developing transport technologies, explores the cultural meanings — her exegesis of Jules Verne's Around the World in Eighty Days is a gem — and outlines the human experience of circumnavigation; one constant, she notes, is the need for reassuring companionship, whether pets or local navigators kidnapped to point the sea routes forward. The book's heart is its profusion of entertaining travel picaresques with their gallery of colorful figures on grand, eccentric, or piratical quests. These anecdotes are so many and so repetitive that the text occasionally feels like it's going in circles, but Chaplin is such a charming, perceptive raconteur that we're happy to drift in the eddies of her prose. Photos, 4 maps. Agent: Andrew Wylie, the Wylie Agency. (Nov. 13)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , With illustrations and maps, a witty and erudite account of the history of circumnavigation and how it has influenced the way we think about the Earth and ourselves. In the first complete account, Joyce Chaplin tells of the outrageous ambitions that inspired men and women to take on the whole planet.

For the past 500 years, human beings have been finding ways to circle the Earth—by sail, steam, or overland; by flying, going into orbit; walking and by cycling.

     Chaplin begins her account in the first centuries of circumnavigation, when few survived the attempt. We meet an array of bold figures who forged the way forward: from Ferdinand Magellan, Francis Drake, and James Cook, through the fictional Phileas Fogg, who did it in eighty days, on to those who vied for titles and records and prizes for being first at something. Circling the globe became a popular sport through momentous innovations—first the railroad (on land), the steamship (luxury), the airplane (speed), and ultimately spacecraft (otherworldly).

     Joyce Chaplin’s exciting narrative brings alive the stories of the “globestruck.” From whatever distance, however far, what they had and have in common is the fierce desire to return to earth.

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