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1 Hawthorne Children's Middle Readers- General

The Thing about Luck

by

The Thing about Luck Cover

 

Awards

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

There is bad luck, good luck, and making your own luck — which is exactly what Summer must do to save her family in this novel from Newbery Medalist Cynthia Kadohata.

Summer knows that "kouun" means "good luck" in Japanese, and this year her family has none of it. Just when she thinks nothing else can possibly go wrong, an emergency whisks her parents away to Japan — right before harvest season. Summer and her little brother, Jaz, are left in the care of their grandparents, who come out of retirement in order to harvest wheat and help pay the bills.

The thing about Obaachan and Jiichan is that they are old-fashioned and demanding, and between helping Obaachan cook for the workers, covering for her when her back pain worsens, and worrying about her lonely little brother, Summer just barely has time to notice the attentions of their boss's cute son. But notice she does, and what begins as a welcome distraction from the hard work soon turns into a mess of its own.

Having thoroughly disappointed her grandmother, Summer figures the bad luck must be finished — but then it gets worse. And when that happens, Summer has to figure out how to change it herself, even if it means further displeasing Obaachan. Because it might be the only way to save her family.

Cynthia Kadohata's ode to the breadbasket of America has received six starred reviews and was selected as a National Book Award Finalist.

Review:

"Sharp characterizations and descriptive details about modern farming invigorate Newbery Medalist Kadohata's (Kira-Kira) funny and warm story about the Japanese-American daughter of migrant workers. Twelve-year-old Summer's family has suffered a year of bad luck that included Summer's near-fatal contraction of malaria and her parents' departure to Japan to be with ailing relatives. In order to make ends meet, Summer's grandparents come out of retirement to work for custom harvesters, which requires them to travel throughout the Midwest. Taking time off from school to accompany them, Summer reflects on her paranoia about mosquitoes, her lonely younger brother's inability to make friends, and her annoyance at her sharp-tongued grandmother. During a time of crisis, however, Summer must set her concerns aside to rise to a challenge. Lively dialogue and a succinct narrative laced with humor effectively convey Summer's emotions, observations, and courage. Readers will relate to her uncertainties and admire both her compassion and her work ethic. Final art not seen by PW. Ages 10–14. Author's agent: Gail Hochman, Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents. Illustrator's agent: Emily van Beek, Folio Literary Management. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"It seems that if Summer's Japanese American family didn't have bad luck, they'd have no luck at all. Certainly good luck (kouun) is elusive. Consider that Summer has had malaria; her little brother, Jaz, is friendless; her parents have to fly to Japan to take care of elderly relatives; and her grandmother (Obaachan) and grandfather (Jii-chan) must pay the mortgage by coming out of retirement to work for a custom harvesting company. When the siblings accompany their grandparents on the harvest, Summer helps her grandmother, a cook, while Jaz is Jaz: intense, focused, and bad-tempered. At first, things go reasonably well, but then Jii-chan becomes sick, and it appears that it might be up to Summer to save the day. Will she succeed? Kadohata has written a gentle family story that is unusual in its focus on the mechanics of wheat harvesting. Readers may skim the more arcane aspects of the labor-intensive work, focusing instead on the emotionally rich and often humorous dynamics of Summer's relationship with her old-fashioned but endearing grandparents and her troubled younger brother. Another engaging novel from the Newbery Medal-winning Kadohata." Booklist, Starred Review

Review:

"Summer's voyage of self-discovery engages readers via her narration, her journal entries and diagrams, and even through her assigned book report of A Separate Peace. Readers who peel back the layers of obsessions and fears will find a character who is determined, compassionate and altogether delightful." Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

About the Author

Cynthia Kadohata is the author of the Newbery Medal-winning book Kira-Kira, the Jane Addams Peace Award and Pen USA Award winner Weedflower, Cracker!, Outside Beauty, A Million Shades of Gray, and several critically acclaimed adult novels, including The Floating World. She has published numerous short stories in such literary journals as the New Yorker, Ploughshares, Grand Street, and the Mississippi Review. She lives with her son and dog in West Covina, California.

Julia Kuo is the creator of 20 Ways to Draw a Cat and 44 Other Awesome Animals as well as the charming board book Everyone Eats. Julia also created the cover and interior artwork for Newbery Medal winning author Cynthia Kadohata’s The Thing About Luck and New York Times bestselling author Jenny Han’s Clara Lee and the Apple Pie Dream. She lives in Chicago.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781416918820
Author:
Kadohata, Cynthia
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Illustrator:
Kuo, Julia
Subject:
Family - Multigenerational
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20130604
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 5 up to 9
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
7.5 x 5 in
Age Level:
from 10 up to 14

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Related Subjects

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Children's » General
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Middle Readers » New Arrivals
Children's » Reference » Family and Genealogy
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Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » New Experience

The Thing about Luck Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$11.95 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Atheneum Books for Young Readers - English 9781416918820 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Sharp characterizations and descriptive details about modern farming invigorate Newbery Medalist Kadohata's (Kira-Kira) funny and warm story about the Japanese-American daughter of migrant workers. Twelve-year-old Summer's family has suffered a year of bad luck that included Summer's near-fatal contraction of malaria and her parents' departure to Japan to be with ailing relatives. In order to make ends meet, Summer's grandparents come out of retirement to work for custom harvesters, which requires them to travel throughout the Midwest. Taking time off from school to accompany them, Summer reflects on her paranoia about mosquitoes, her lonely younger brother's inability to make friends, and her annoyance at her sharp-tongued grandmother. During a time of crisis, however, Summer must set her concerns aside to rise to a challenge. Lively dialogue and a succinct narrative laced with humor effectively convey Summer's emotions, observations, and courage. Readers will relate to her uncertainties and admire both her compassion and her work ethic. Final art not seen by PW. Ages 10–14. Author's agent: Gail Hochman, Brandt & Hochman Literary Agents. Illustrator's agent: Emily van Beek, Folio Literary Management. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "It seems that if Summer's Japanese American family didn't have bad luck, they'd have no luck at all. Certainly good luck (kouun) is elusive. Consider that Summer has had malaria; her little brother, Jaz, is friendless; her parents have to fly to Japan to take care of elderly relatives; and her grandmother (Obaachan) and grandfather (Jii-chan) must pay the mortgage by coming out of retirement to work for a custom harvesting company. When the siblings accompany their grandparents on the harvest, Summer helps her grandmother, a cook, while Jaz is Jaz: intense, focused, and bad-tempered. At first, things go reasonably well, but then Jii-chan becomes sick, and it appears that it might be up to Summer to save the day. Will she succeed? Kadohata has written a gentle family story that is unusual in its focus on the mechanics of wheat harvesting. Readers may skim the more arcane aspects of the labor-intensive work, focusing instead on the emotionally rich and often humorous dynamics of Summer's relationship with her old-fashioned but endearing grandparents and her troubled younger brother. Another engaging novel from the Newbery Medal-winning Kadohata."
"Review" by , "Summer's voyage of self-discovery engages readers via her narration, her journal entries and diagrams, and even through her assigned book report of A Separate Peace. Readers who peel back the layers of obsessions and fears will find a character who is determined, compassionate and altogether delightful."
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