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2 Beaverton Economics- General

World 3.0: Global Prosperity and How to Achieve It

by

World 3.0: Global Prosperity and How to Achieve It Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Since the financial crisis of 2008, many of us have had to reexamine our beliefs about markets and globalization. How integrated should economies really be? How much regulation is right?

Many people fuse these two dimensions of choice into one, either favoring both globalization and deregulation—or opposing both of them.

It doesnt have to be that way.

In World 3.0, award-winning author and economist Pankaj Ghemawat reveals the folly in both of these responses. He calls for a third worldview—one in which both regulation and cross-border integration coexist and complement one another.

Ghemawat starts by exposing common assumptions about globalization to hard data, proving that the world is not nearly as globalized as we think. And he explains why the potential gains from further integration are much larger than even pro globalizers tend to believe.

He then tackles market failures and fears—job losses, environmental degradation, macroeconomic volatility, and trade and capital imbalances—that opponents of globalization often invoke. Drawing on compelling data, he shows that increased globalization can actually alleviate some of these problems.

Finally, Ghemawat describes how a wide range of players—businesses, policy makers, citizens, media—can help open up flows of ideas, people, and goods across borders, but in ways that maximize the benefits and minimize the potential side effects.

World 3.0 dispels powerfully entrenched—but incorrect—assumptions about globalization. Provocative and bold, this new book explains how people around the world can secure their collective prosperity through new approaches to cross-border integration. Ghemawats thinking will surprise and move you—no matter where you stand on globalization.

World 3.0 reveals how we're not nearly as globalized as we think we are, and how people around the world can secure their collective prosperity through new approaches to cross-border integration. Provocative and bold, this new book will surprise and move you, no matter where you stand on globalization.

Review:

"Somewhere both above and between Thomas Friedman's nearly unbridled enthusiasm for globalization and the paranoid Marxist rhetoric of undergraduate sociology courses comes World 3.0, a more realistic and fact-based approach to world socioeconomic dynamics. Ghemawat eschews the 'golden straitjacket' ideology so integral to Friedman's approach with a vengeance and suggests that globalizing countries need not give up anything. Open borders, he argues, will lead to a much better living standard for all. He offers the 'Law' of Distance as a new paradigm for understanding future global dynamics. Ghemawat maintains that a cultural distance must be kept between sovereign nations (in other words, throwing away the paradigm of what he describes as World 2.0). 'Globalization' is not nearly as prevalent as many believe, and Ghemawat utilizes a smattering of economic philosophy, which if properly applied by players in World 2.0, will help keep economic, social, and political borders separate yet together. Ultimately, this book may only be accessible to the most advanced academic readers, but it should be included on the reading list of anyone interested in the subject. (May)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Book News Annotation:

In this reexamination of ideas about markets and globalization, Ghemawat (global strategy, IESE Business School, Barcelona) calls for a worldview located between the poles of those favoring and opposing globalization and deregulation--a worldview in which both market regulation and cross-border market integration complement one another. The author exposes common assumptions about globalization, using hard data to prove that globalization is not as widespread as most people think. He delves into seven problems that opponents of globalization often invoke, such as job losses, environmental degradation, and trade and capital imbalances, and uses data to show that increased globalization can alleviate some of these problems. The author describes a vision in which businesses, policy makers, citizens, and media can help open up flows of ideas, people, and goods across borders. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The world looks far different today than it did before the global financial crisis struck. Reeling from the most brutal impacts of the recession, governments, economies, and societies everywhere are retrenching and pushing hard for increased protectionism. That's understandable, but it's also dangerous, maintains global economy expert Pankaj Ghemawat in World 3.0. Left unchecked, heightened protectionism could prevent peoples around the world from achieving the true gains afforded by cross-border openness.

Ghemawat paints a disturbing picture of what could happen--to household income, availability of goods and services, and other quality-of-life metrics--should globalization continue to reverse direction. He then describes how a wide range of players' private businesses, policy makers, citizens, the press' could help open flows of ideas, people, and goods across borders, but in ways that maximize economic benefits for all.

World 3.0 reveals how we're not nearly as globalized as we think we are, and how people around the world can secure their collective prosperity through new approaches to cross-border integration. Provocative and bold, this new book will surprise and move you, no matter where you stand on globalization.

About the Author

Pankaj Ghemawat is the Anselmo Rubiralta Professor of Global Strategy at IESE Business School in Barcelona. He is the author of five books and many articles published in academic journals as well as the popular press. He received the McKinsey Award for his Harvard Business Review article "Regional Strategies for Global Leadership."

Product Details

ISBN:
9781422138649
Author:
Ghemawat, Pankaj
Publisher:
Harvard Business School Press
Subject:
Management - General
Subject:
Management
Subject:
Economics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20110531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

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Related Subjects

Business » Featured Titles
Business » General
Business » Human Resource Management
Business » Management
Business » Strategy
Business » Writing
History and Social Science » Economics » General

World 3.0: Global Prosperity and How to Achieve It Used Hardcover
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Product details 400 pages Harvard Business School Press - English 9781422138649 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Somewhere both above and between Thomas Friedman's nearly unbridled enthusiasm for globalization and the paranoid Marxist rhetoric of undergraduate sociology courses comes World 3.0, a more realistic and fact-based approach to world socioeconomic dynamics. Ghemawat eschews the 'golden straitjacket' ideology so integral to Friedman's approach with a vengeance and suggests that globalizing countries need not give up anything. Open borders, he argues, will lead to a much better living standard for all. He offers the 'Law' of Distance as a new paradigm for understanding future global dynamics. Ghemawat maintains that a cultural distance must be kept between sovereign nations (in other words, throwing away the paradigm of what he describes as World 2.0). 'Globalization' is not nearly as prevalent as many believe, and Ghemawat utilizes a smattering of economic philosophy, which if properly applied by players in World 2.0, will help keep economic, social, and political borders separate yet together. Ultimately, this book may only be accessible to the most advanced academic readers, but it should be included on the reading list of anyone interested in the subject. (May)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
The world looks far different today than it did before the global financial crisis struck. Reeling from the most brutal impacts of the recession, governments, economies, and societies everywhere are retrenching and pushing hard for increased protectionism. That's understandable, but it's also dangerous, maintains global economy expert Pankaj Ghemawat in World 3.0. Left unchecked, heightened protectionism could prevent peoples around the world from achieving the true gains afforded by cross-border openness.

Ghemawat paints a disturbing picture of what could happen--to household income, availability of goods and services, and other quality-of-life metrics--should globalization continue to reverse direction. He then describes how a wide range of players' private businesses, policy makers, citizens, the press' could help open flows of ideas, people, and goods across borders, but in ways that maximize economic benefits for all.

World 3.0 reveals how we're not nearly as globalized as we think we are, and how people around the world can secure their collective prosperity through new approaches to cross-border integration. Provocative and bold, this new book will surprise and move you, no matter where you stand on globalization.

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