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The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?

by

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations? Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The sequel to national bestseller Currency Wars predicts the next collapse of theand#160;monetary system and shows investors how to survive it

The international monetary system collapsed three times in the past hundred yearsand#151;in 1914, 1939, and 1971and#151;and the next collapse is already in sight. This time the dollar wonand#8217;t save us. In fact, the dollar itself will be the cause of the crisis.

Central bankers and the head of the IMF candidly admit that monetary policy is in unchartered waters. The world is witnessing no less than a global money experiment. Savers, investors, and everyday citizens are the guinea pigs in the central bankersand#8217; laboratory.

Bestselling author James Rickards explains why money and wealth have now become separated. Money is transitory, ephemeral, and may soon be worthless if central bankers continue on their current path. Wealth is permanent, tangible, and has real value worldwide. Gold, fine art, and land are forms of wealth. Investors who convert paper money into real wealth will survive the coming monetary maelstrom. But those who do not will lose what they have.

Rickards illuminates the death of money unfolding before our eyes, and helps readers prepare before itand#8217;s too late.

and#147; Unsettling . . . fascinating . . . a thorough analysis of how nations have manipulated their currencies . . . with disastrous consequences.and#8221; and#151;and#160;Fort Worth Star-Telegram

and#147; One of the scariest books Iand#8217;ve read this year . . . The picture that emerges is dark yet comprehensive and satisfying.and#8221; and#151;and#160;Bloomberg BusinessWeek

and#147;One of the most urgent books of the fall.and#8221; and#151; Politico

Review:

"'The power of the state is back,' announces Bremmer (The Fat Tail), president of the Eurasia Group, in this sobering examination of the threat the emerging powers of China, Russia, and Saudi Arabia pose to the free market. The book presents a whirlwind history of capitalism from mercantilism through the end of the cold war to the ascendancy of 'state capitalism,' a political and economic arrangement in which states exert their influence over markets and big business to serve their own interests. Bremmer provides informative case studies of economies with varying degrees of state control: Algeria's authoritarian regime, Mexico's relatively open and democratic system, and China, the 'leading practitioner of state capitalism,' in which Beijing has assumed only more economic power in the wake of the financial crisis. He weighs how free market economies can compete and concludes on a hopeful note, laying out a powerful case for the superiority of regulated free markets above state capitalism and a clear prescription for how the U.S. can defend its competitive advantage in the future." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

This work details the growing phenomenon of state capitalism, a system in which governments drive local economies through ownership of market-dominant companies. This trend threatens America's competitive edge and the conduct of free markets everywhere.

Synopsis:

G-Zero — \JEE-ZEER-oh\ —n

A world order in which no single country or durable alliance of countries can meet the challenges of global leadership. What happens when the G20 doesnt work and the G7 is history.

 

If the worst threatened—a rogue nuclear state, a major health crisis, the collapse of the global financial system—where would the world look for leadership?

 

For the first time in seven decades, there is no single power or alliance of powers ready to take on the challenges of global leadership. A generation ago, the United States, Europe, and Japan were the worlds powerhouses, the free-market democra­cies that propelled the global economy forward. But today, they struggle just to find their footing.

 

Acclaimed geopolitical analyst Ian Bremmer argues that this leadership vacuum is here to stay, as power is regionalized instead of globalized. Now that so many challenges transcend borders—from the stability of the global economy and climate change to cyber-attacks and terrorism—the need for international cooperation has never been greater.

Synopsis:

If the worst threatened—a rogue nuclear state with a horrible surprise, a global health crisis, the collapse of financial institutions from New York to Shanghai and Mumbai—where would the world look for leadership?
 
For the first time in seven decades, there is no single power or alliance of powers ready to take on the challenges of global leadership. A generation ago, the United States, Europe, and Japan were the world’s powerhouses, the free-market democracies that propelled the global economy forward. Today, they struggle just to find their footing.
 
Acclaimed geopolitical analyst Ian Bremmer argues that the world is facing a leadership vacuum. The diverse political and economic values of the G20 have produced global gridlock. Now that so many challenges transcend borders—from the stability of the global economy and climate change to cyber-attacks, terrorism, and the security of food and water—the need for international cooperation has never been greater.
 
Every Nation for Itself offers essential insights for anyone attempting to navigate the new global playing field.

About the Author

Ian Bremmer is the president of Eurasia Group, the world's leading global political risk research and consulting firm. He has written for The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Newsweek, Foreign Affairs, and other publications, and his previous books are The J Curve: A New Way to Understand Why Nations Rise and Fall and The Fat Tail: The Power of Political Knowledge for Strategic Investing.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781591843016
Subtitle:
Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?
Author:
Bremmer, Ian
Author:
Rickards, James
Publisher:
Portfolio Hardcover
Subject:
Government & Business
Subject:
Free Enterprise
Subject:
Business Writing
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Money & Monetary Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20100513
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 b/w diagram
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 1 lb
Age Level:
18-17

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Related Subjects

Business » Business Law
Business » General
Business » Management
Business » Writing
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations? Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$2.50 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Portfolio - English 9781591843016 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'The power of the state is back,' announces Bremmer (The Fat Tail), president of the Eurasia Group, in this sobering examination of the threat the emerging powers of China, Russia, and Saudi Arabia pose to the free market. The book presents a whirlwind history of capitalism from mercantilism through the end of the cold war to the ascendancy of 'state capitalism,' a political and economic arrangement in which states exert their influence over markets and big business to serve their own interests. Bremmer provides informative case studies of economies with varying degrees of state control: Algeria's authoritarian regime, Mexico's relatively open and democratic system, and China, the 'leading practitioner of state capitalism,' in which Beijing has assumed only more economic power in the wake of the financial crisis. He weighs how free market economies can compete and concludes on a hopeful note, laying out a powerful case for the superiority of regulated free markets above state capitalism and a clear prescription for how the U.S. can defend its competitive advantage in the future." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , This work details the growing phenomenon of state capitalism, a system in which governments drive local economies through ownership of market-dominant companies. This trend threatens America's competitive edge and the conduct of free markets everywhere.
"Synopsis" by ,
G-Zero — \JEE-ZEER-oh\ —n

A world order in which no single country or durable alliance of countries can meet the challenges of global leadership. What happens when the G20 doesnt work and the G7 is history.

 

If the worst threatened—a rogue nuclear state, a major health crisis, the collapse of the global financial system—where would the world look for leadership?

 

For the first time in seven decades, there is no single power or alliance of powers ready to take on the challenges of global leadership. A generation ago, the United States, Europe, and Japan were the worlds powerhouses, the free-market democra­cies that propelled the global economy forward. But today, they struggle just to find their footing.

 

Acclaimed geopolitical analyst Ian Bremmer argues that this leadership vacuum is here to stay, as power is regionalized instead of globalized. Now that so many challenges transcend borders—from the stability of the global economy and climate change to cyber-attacks and terrorism—the need for international cooperation has never been greater.

"Synopsis" by ,
If the worst threatened—a rogue nuclear state with a horrible surprise, a global health crisis, the collapse of financial institutions from New York to Shanghai and Mumbai—where would the world look for leadership?
 
For the first time in seven decades, there is no single power or alliance of powers ready to take on the challenges of global leadership. A generation ago, the United States, Europe, and Japan were the world’s powerhouses, the free-market democracies that propelled the global economy forward. Today, they struggle just to find their footing.
 
Acclaimed geopolitical analyst Ian Bremmer argues that the world is facing a leadership vacuum. The diverse political and economic values of the G20 have produced global gridlock. Now that so many challenges transcend borders—from the stability of the global economy and climate change to cyber-attacks, terrorism, and the security of food and water—the need for international cooperation has never been greater.
 
Every Nation for Itself offers essential insights for anyone attempting to navigate the new global playing field.
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