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1 Beaverton Business- Management

How Starbucks Saved My Life: A Son of Privilege Learns to Live Like Everyone Else

by

How Starbucks Saved My Life: A Son of Privilege Learns to Live Like Everyone Else Cover

ISBN13: 9781592402861
ISBN10: 1592402860
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $7.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In his fifties, Michael Gates Gill had it all: a big house in the suburbs, a loving family, and a top job at an ad agency with a six-figure salary. By the time he turned sixty, he had lost everything except his Ivy League education and his sense of entitlement. First, he was downsized at work. Next, an affair ended his twenty-year marriage. Then, he was diagnosed with a slow-growing brain tumor, prognosis undetermined. Around the same time, his girlfriend gave birth to a son. Gill had no money, no health insurance, and no prospects.

One day as Gill sat in a Manhattan Starbucks with his last affordable luxury — a latte — brooding about his misfortune and quickly dwindling list of options, a 28-year-old Starbucks manager named Crystal Thompson approached him, half joking, to offer him a job. With nothing to lose, he took it, and went from drinking coffee in a Brooks Brothers suit to serving it in a green uniform. For the first time in his life, Gill was a minority — the only older white guy working with a team of young African-Americans. He was forced to acknowledge his ingrained prejudices and admit to himself that, far from being beneath him, his new job was hard. And his younger coworkers, despite having half the education and twice the personal difficulties he'd ever faced, were running circles around him.

The other baristas treated Gill with respect and kindness despite his differences, and he began to feel a new emotion: gratitude. Crossing over the Starbucks bar was the beginning of a dramatic transformation that cracked his world wide open. When all of his defenses and the armor of entitlement had been stripped away, a humbler, happier and gentler man remained. One that everyone, especially Michael's kids, liked a lot better.

The backdrop to Gill's story is a nearly universal cultural phenomenon: the Starbucks experience. In How Starbucks Saved My Life, we step behind the counter of one of the world's best-known companies and discover how it all really works, who the baristas are and what they love (and hate) about their jobs. Inside Starbucks, as Crystal and Mike's friendship grows, we see what wonders can happen when we reach out across race, class, and age divisions to help a fellow human being

Review:

"'The son of New Yorker writer Brendan Gill grew up meeting the likes of Ezra Pound and Ernest Hemingway. A Yale education led to a job at prestigious J. Walter Thompson Advertising. But at 63, the younger Gill's sweet life has gone sour. Long fired from JWT, his own business is collapsing and an ill-advised affair has resulted in a new son and a divorce. At this low point, and in need of health insurance for a just diagnosed brain tumor, Gill fills out an application for Starbucks and is assigned to the store on 93rd and Broadway in New York City, staffed primarily by African-Americans. Working as a barista, Gill, who is white, gets an education in race relations and the life of a working class Joe . Gill certainly has a story to tell, but his narrative is flooded with saccharine flashbacks, when it could have detailed how his very different, much younger colleagues, especially his endearing 28-year-old manager, Crystal Thompson, came to accept him. The book reads too much like an employee handbook, as Gill details his duties or explains how the company chooses its coffee. Gill's devotion to the superchain has obviously changed his life for the better, but that same devotion makes for a repetitive, unsatisfying read. Photos not seen by PW. (Sept.)' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"How Starbucks Saved My Life is based on the simple idea that down-to-earth, humbling labor can help you re-orient your values and priorities and give you new life. It will speak to anyone in need of radical surgery on their worldview, and that includes most of us. Sit down with a cup of coffee and this book and entertain yourself toward enlightenment." Thomas Moore, author of Care of the Soul, Dark Nights of the Soul, and The Worth of Our Work

Review:

"I like my Starbucks, but I loved this book. It hit me emotionally and intellectually, right in the gut. The message, what the world needs to embrace most, made my cup runneth over!" Dr. Denis Waitley, author of The Seeds of Greatness

Review:

"A great lesson in finding your highest self in the unlikeliest of places — proof positive that there is no way to happiness — rather, happiness is the way." Wayne Dyer

Review:

"[An] enthralling true life tale of one man's attempt to right the errors of his past by physically working for self-respect instead of waiting for it to be handed to him on a silver platter." San Antonio Express-News

Synopsis:

The riches-to-rags true story of an advertising executive who had it all, then lost it all-and was finally redeemed by his new job, and his twenty-eight-year-old boss, at Starbucks.

Synopsis:

Now in paperback, the national bestselling riches-to-rags true story of an advertising executive who had it all, then lost it all—and was finally redeemed by his new job, and his twenty-eight-year-old boss, at Starbucks.

In his fifties, Michael Gates Gill had it all: a mansion in the suburbs, a wife and loving children, a six-figure salary, and an Ivy League education. But in a few short years, he lost his job, got divorced, and was diagnosed with a brain tumor. With no money or health insurance, he was forced to get a job at Starbucks. Having gone from power lunches to scrubbing toilets, from being served to serving, Michael was a true fish out of water.

But fate brings an unexpected teacher into his life who opens his eyes to what living well really looks like. The two seem to have nothing in common: She is a young African American, the daughter of a drug addict; he is used to being the boss but reports to her now. For the first time in his life he experiences being a member of a minority trying hard to survive in a challenging new job. He learns the value of hard work and humility, as well as what it truly means to respect another person.

Behind the scenes at one of America’s most intriguing businesses, an inspiring friendship is born, a family begins to heal, and, thanks to his unlikely mentor, Michael Gill at last experiences a sense of self-worth and happiness he has never known before.

Watch a QuickTime trailer for this book.

About the Author

Michael Gates Gill is the son of New Yorker writer Brendan Gill and he was a creative director at J. Walter Thompson Advertising where he was employed for over 25 years. He currently lives in New York within walking distance of the Starbucks store where he works, and has no plans to retire from what he calls the best job he's ever had.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Connie Hayek, February 20, 2008 (view all comments by Connie Hayek)
This book is a great reminder that money does not equal happiness. The book is a powerful message to 'follow your bliss'--it may be found in the most unlikely of places/careers.
The author provides an incredible description of how he shed his old stereotypes about people, careers, money, and family. Cheers to the author for sharing his story of building a meaningful life serving others. This is the best book I've read all year!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(7 of 7 readers found this comment helpful)
Deborah Fochler, November 3, 2007 (view all comments by Deborah Fochler)
For anyone who has ever lost their job or found themselves in money trouble. Gives hope to all. Also, learned a lot about Starbucks and now I have tremendous respect for that company. A great story - another American Dream fulfilled. It is easy to read and
offers a different perspective on the pitfalls of commerce.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(9 of 14 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9781592402861
Subtitle:
A Son of Privilege Learns to Live Like Everyone Else
Author:
Gill, Michael Gates
Publisher:
Gotham
Subject:
Business
Subject:
Specific Groups - Special Needs
Subject:
Personal Memoirs
Subject:
Employees
Subject:
Patients
Subject:
Industries - Hospitality, Travel & Tourism
Subject:
Gill, Michael
Subject:
Advertising executives - New York (State) -
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback / softback
Publication Date:
20080902
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 8
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
7.80x5.54x1.04 in. .77 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Business » Business Profiles
Business » Featured Titles
Business » Management
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » Memoirs

How Starbucks Saved My Life: A Son of Privilege Learns to Live Like Everyone Else Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$7.95 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Gotham Books - English 9781592402861 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "'The son of New Yorker writer Brendan Gill grew up meeting the likes of Ezra Pound and Ernest Hemingway. A Yale education led to a job at prestigious J. Walter Thompson Advertising. But at 63, the younger Gill's sweet life has gone sour. Long fired from JWT, his own business is collapsing and an ill-advised affair has resulted in a new son and a divorce. At this low point, and in need of health insurance for a just diagnosed brain tumor, Gill fills out an application for Starbucks and is assigned to the store on 93rd and Broadway in New York City, staffed primarily by African-Americans. Working as a barista, Gill, who is white, gets an education in race relations and the life of a working class Joe . Gill certainly has a story to tell, but his narrative is flooded with saccharine flashbacks, when it could have detailed how his very different, much younger colleagues, especially his endearing 28-year-old manager, Crystal Thompson, came to accept him. The book reads too much like an employee handbook, as Gill details his duties or explains how the company chooses its coffee. Gill's devotion to the superchain has obviously changed his life for the better, but that same devotion makes for a repetitive, unsatisfying read. Photos not seen by PW. (Sept.)' Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "How Starbucks Saved My Life is based on the simple idea that down-to-earth, humbling labor can help you re-orient your values and priorities and give you new life. It will speak to anyone in need of radical surgery on their worldview, and that includes most of us. Sit down with a cup of coffee and this book and entertain yourself toward enlightenment."
"Review" by , "I like my Starbucks, but I loved this book. It hit me emotionally and intellectually, right in the gut. The message, what the world needs to embrace most, made my cup runneth over!"
"Review" by , "A great lesson in finding your highest self in the unlikeliest of places — proof positive that there is no way to happiness — rather, happiness is the way."
"Review" by , "[An] enthralling true life tale of one man's attempt to right the errors of his past by physically working for self-respect instead of waiting for it to be handed to him on a silver platter."
"Synopsis" by ,
The riches-to-rags true story of an advertising executive who had it all, then lost it all-and was finally redeemed by his new job, and his twenty-eight-year-old boss, at Starbucks.

"Synopsis" by ,
Now in paperback, the national bestselling riches-to-rags true story of an advertising executive who had it all, then lost it all—and was finally redeemed by his new job, and his twenty-eight-year-old boss, at Starbucks.

In his fifties, Michael Gates Gill had it all: a mansion in the suburbs, a wife and loving children, a six-figure salary, and an Ivy League education. But in a few short years, he lost his job, got divorced, and was diagnosed with a brain tumor. With no money or health insurance, he was forced to get a job at Starbucks. Having gone from power lunches to scrubbing toilets, from being served to serving, Michael was a true fish out of water.

But fate brings an unexpected teacher into his life who opens his eyes to what living well really looks like. The two seem to have nothing in common: She is a young African American, the daughter of a drug addict; he is used to being the boss but reports to her now. For the first time in his life he experiences being a member of a minority trying hard to survive in a challenging new job. He learns the value of hard work and humility, as well as what it truly means to respect another person.

Behind the scenes at one of America’s most intriguing businesses, an inspiring friendship is born, a family begins to heal, and, thanks to his unlikely mentor, Michael Gill at last experiences a sense of self-worth and happiness he has never known before.

Watch a QuickTime trailer for this book.

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