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1 Burnside Health and Medicine- Politics of Health Care

This title in other editions

The Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care

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The Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The untold story of the courageous doctors and nurses who fought the battle for racial justice in hospitals, in clinics, and on the streets in the 1960s.

The Medical Committee for Human Rights was organized in the summer of 1964 by medical professionals, mostly white and Northern, to provide care and support for Civil Rights activists who were organizing black voters in Mississippi. They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from Freedom Summer, to the March on Selma, to the Chicago Democratic Convention of 1968. Galvanized, and sometimes radicalized, by their firsthand view of disenfranchised communities, the MCHR soon expanded its mission to encompass a range of causes from poverty to the war in Vietnam, and later took on the whole of the United States healthcare system. The MCHR doctors soon realized that fighting segregation would mean not just caring for white volunteers, but exposing and correcting the shocking inequalities in segregated health care. They pioneered community health plans and brought medical care to underserved, or unserved, areas.

Though education was the most famous battleground for integration, the appaling injustice of segregated health care had equally devastating consequences. Award-winning historian John Dittmer, author of the classic Civil Rights history Local People, has written an insightful and moving account of a group of idealists who put their careers in the service of the belief, stated in their motto, that "Health Care Is a Human Right."

Synopsis:

Award-winning historian Dittmer gives an insightful and inspiring account of a group of courageous doctors and nurses who fought the battle for racial justice in hospitals, clinics, and on the streets in the 1960s. b&w illustrations throughout.

Synopsis:

The untold story of the courageous doctors and nurses who fought the battle for racial justice in hospitals, in clinics, and on the streets in the 1960s.

The Medical Committee for Human Rights was organized in the summer of 1964 by medical professionals, mostly white and Northern, to provide care and support for Civil Rights activists who were organizing black voters in Mississippi. They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from Freedom Summer, to the March on Selma, to the Chicago Democratic Convention of 1968. Galvanized, and sometimes radicalized, by their firsthand view of disenfranchised communities, the MCHR soon expanded its mission to encompass a range of causes from poverty to the war in Vietnam, and later took on the whole of the United States healthcare system. The MCHR doctors soon realized that fighting segregation would mean not just caring for white volunteers, but exposing and correcting the shocking inequalities in segregated health care. They pioneered community health plans and brought medical care to underserved, or unserved, areas.

Though education was the most famous battleground for integration, the appaling injustice of segregated health care had equally devastating consequences. Award-winning historian John Dittmer, author of the classic Civil Rights history Local People, has written an insightful and moving account of a group of idealists who put their careers in the service of the belief, stated in their motto, that Health Care Is a Human Right.

About the Author

John Dittmer received the Bancroft Prize, and several other awards, for Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. He is a professor of history at DePauw University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781596915671
Author:
Dittmer, John
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Subject:
Civil rights movements
Subject:
Social medicine
Subject:
Americas (North Central South West Indies)
Subject:
Health Care Delivery
Subject:
History
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
United States - 20th Century/60s
Subject:
Social medicine -- United States.
Subject:
Right to health care -- United States.
Subject:
Health and Medicine-History of Medicine
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20090531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
BandW Illustrations throughout
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Politics of Health Care
History and Social Science » Sociology » Disease and Health Issues
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care Used Hardcover
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Product details 336 pages Bloomsbury Publishing PLC - English 9781596915671 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Award-winning historian Dittmer gives an insightful and inspiring account of a group of courageous doctors and nurses who fought the battle for racial justice in hospitals, clinics, and on the streets in the 1960s. b&w illustrations throughout.
"Synopsis" by , The untold story of the courageous doctors and nurses who fought the battle for racial justice in hospitals, in clinics, and on the streets in the 1960s.

The Medical Committee for Human Rights was organized in the summer of 1964 by medical professionals, mostly white and Northern, to provide care and support for Civil Rights activists who were organizing black voters in Mississippi. They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from Freedom Summer, to the March on Selma, to the Chicago Democratic Convention of 1968. Galvanized, and sometimes radicalized, by their firsthand view of disenfranchised communities, the MCHR soon expanded its mission to encompass a range of causes from poverty to the war in Vietnam, and later took on the whole of the United States healthcare system. The MCHR doctors soon realized that fighting segregation would mean not just caring for white volunteers, but exposing and correcting the shocking inequalities in segregated health care. They pioneered community health plans and brought medical care to underserved, or unserved, areas.

Though education was the most famous battleground for integration, the appaling injustice of segregated health care had equally devastating consequences. Award-winning historian John Dittmer, author of the classic Civil Rights history Local People, has written an insightful and moving account of a group of idealists who put their careers in the service of the belief, stated in their motto, that Health Care Is a Human Right.

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