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Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples

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Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples Cover

ISBN13: 9781856496247
ISBN10: 1856496244
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“NOW AVAILABLE- FULLY UPDATED SECOND EDITION OF DECOLONIZING METHODOLOGIES. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.” From the vantage point of the colonized, the term "research" is inextricably linked with European colonialism; the ways in which scientific research has been implicated in the worst excesses of imperialism remains a powerful remembered history for many of the world's colonized peoples. Here, an indigenous researcher issues a clarion call for the decolonization of research methods.

The book is divided into two parts. In the first, the author critically examines the historical and philosophical base of Western research. Extending the work of Foucault, she explores the intersections of imperialism, knowledge and research, and the different ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and methodologies as "regimes of truth." Providing a history of knowledge from the Enlightenment to Postcoloniality, she also discusses the fate of concepts such as "discovery", "claiming", and "naming" through which the west has incorporated and continues to incorporate the indigenous world within its own web.

The second part of the book meets the urgent need for people who are carrying out their own research projects, for literature which validates their frustrations in dealing with various western paradigms, academic traditions and methodologies, which continue to position the indigenous as "Other." In setting an agenda for planning and implementing indigenous research, the author shows how such programmes are part of the wider project of reclaiming control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Exploring the broad range of issues which have confronted, and continue to confront, indigenous peoples, in their encounters with western knowledge, this book also sets a standard for truly emancipatory research. It brilliantly demonstrates that "when indigenous peoples become the researchers and not merely the researched, the activity of research is transformed."

Synopsis:

'NOW AVAILABLE- FULLY UPDATED SECOND EDITION OF DECOLONIZING METHODOLOGIES. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.'

From the vantage point of the colonized, the term "research" is inextricably linked with European colonialism; the ways in which scientific research has been implicated in the worst excesses of imperialism remains a powerful remembered history for many of the world's colonized peoples. Here, an indigenous researcher issues a clarion call for the decolonization of research methods.

The book is divided into two parts. In the first, the author critically examines the historical and philosophical base of Western research. Extending the work of Foucault, she explores the intersections of imperialism, knowledge and research, and the different ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and methodologies as "regimes of truth". Providing a history of knowledge from the Enlightenment to Postcoloniality, she also discusses the fate of concepts such as "discovery", "claiming", and "naming" through which the west has incorporated and continues to incorporate the indigenous world within its own web.

The second part of the book meets the urgent need for people who are carrying out their own research projects, for literature which validates their frustrations in dealing with various western paradigms, academic traditions and methodologies, which continue to position the indigenous as "Other". In setting an agenda for planning and implementing indigenous research, the author shows how such programmes are part of the wider project of reclaiming control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Exploring the broad range of issues which have confronted, and continue to confront, indigenous peoples, in their encounters with western knowledge, this book also sets a standard for truly emancipatory research. It brilliantly demonstrates that "when indigenous peoples become the researchers and not merely the researched, the activity of research is transformed."

Synopsis:

From the vantage point of the colonized, the term 'research' is inextricably linked with European colonialism; the ways in which scientific research has been implicated in the worst excesses of imperialism remains a powerful remembered history for many of the world's colonized peoples. Here, an indigenous researcher issues a clarion call for the decolonization of research methods.

The book is divided into two parts. In the first, the author critically examines the historical and philosophical base of Western research. Extending the work of Foucault, she explores the intersections of imperialism, knowledge and research, and the different ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and methodologies as 'regimes of truth'. Providing a history of knowledge from the Enlightenment to Postcoloniality, she also discusses the fate of concepts such as 'discovery, 'claiming' and 'naming' through which the west has incorporated and continues to incorporate the indigenous world within its own web.

The second part of the book meets the urgent need for people who are carrying out their own research projects, for literature which validates their frustrations in dealing with various western paradigms, academic traditions and methodologies, which continue to position the indigenous as 'Other'. In setting an agenda for planning and implementing indigenous research, the author shows how such programmes are part of the wider project of reclaiming control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Exploring the broad range of issues which have confronted, and continue to confront, indigenous peoples, in their encounters with western knowledge, this book also sets a standard for truly emancipatory research. It brilliantly demonstrates that ‘when indigenous peoples become the researchers and not merely the researched, the activity of research is transformed.’

About the Author

Linda Tuhiwai Smith is an Associate Professor in Education and Director of the International Research Institute for Maori and Indigenous Education at the University of Auckland.

Table of Contents

Imperialism, History, Writing and Theory * Research through the Imperial Lens * Colonizing Knowledges * Research Adventures * The End of One Part, the Beginning of Another * Setting the Modern Indigenous Research Agenda * Articulating an Indigenous Research Agenda * Twenty-Five Projects * Responding to the Imperatives of an Indigenous Agenda: A Case Study of Maori * Towards Developing Indigenous Methodologies: Kaupapa Maori Research * Conclusion: A Personal Journey

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

micha210, February 25, 2007 (view all comments by micha210)
Linda Smith does an excellent job of describing colonization from the viewpoint of the colonized and incorporating Maori traditions.
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(14 of 18 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9781856496247
Subtitle:
Research and Indigenous Peoples
Author:
Smith, Linda Tuhiwai
Author:
Cram101 Textbook Reviews
Author:
Tuhiwai Smith, Linda
Publisher:
Zed Books
Subject:
Ethnology
Subject:
Methodology
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Research
Subject:
Imperialism
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Sociology-Reference and Methodology
Subject:
Education-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
19990315
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Notes, Index
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9.09 x 5.64 x 0.58 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Field Work
History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Reference and Methodology
Humanities » Philosophy » General

Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.50 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Zed Books - English 9781856496247 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , 'NOW AVAILABLE- FULLY UPDATED SECOND EDITION OF DECOLONIZING METHODOLOGIES. CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION.'

From the vantage point of the colonized, the term "research" is inextricably linked with European colonialism; the ways in which scientific research has been implicated in the worst excesses of imperialism remains a powerful remembered history for many of the world's colonized peoples. Here, an indigenous researcher issues a clarion call for the decolonization of research methods.

The book is divided into two parts. In the first, the author critically examines the historical and philosophical base of Western research. Extending the work of Foucault, she explores the intersections of imperialism, knowledge and research, and the different ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and methodologies as "regimes of truth". Providing a history of knowledge from the Enlightenment to Postcoloniality, she also discusses the fate of concepts such as "discovery", "claiming", and "naming" through which the west has incorporated and continues to incorporate the indigenous world within its own web.

The second part of the book meets the urgent need for people who are carrying out their own research projects, for literature which validates their frustrations in dealing with various western paradigms, academic traditions and methodologies, which continue to position the indigenous as "Other". In setting an agenda for planning and implementing indigenous research, the author shows how such programmes are part of the wider project of reclaiming control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Exploring the broad range of issues which have confronted, and continue to confront, indigenous peoples, in their encounters with western knowledge, this book also sets a standard for truly emancipatory research. It brilliantly demonstrates that "when indigenous peoples become the researchers and not merely the researched, the activity of research is transformed."

"Synopsis" by ,
From the vantage point of the colonized, the term 'research' is inextricably linked with European colonialism; the ways in which scientific research has been implicated in the worst excesses of imperialism remains a powerful remembered history for many of the world's colonized peoples. Here, an indigenous researcher issues a clarion call for the decolonization of research methods.

The book is divided into two parts. In the first, the author critically examines the historical and philosophical base of Western research. Extending the work of Foucault, she explores the intersections of imperialism, knowledge and research, and the different ways in which imperialism is embedded in disciplines of knowledge and methodologies as 'regimes of truth'. Providing a history of knowledge from the Enlightenment to Postcoloniality, she also discusses the fate of concepts such as 'discovery, 'claiming' and 'naming' through which the west has incorporated and continues to incorporate the indigenous world within its own web.

The second part of the book meets the urgent need for people who are carrying out their own research projects, for literature which validates their frustrations in dealing with various western paradigms, academic traditions and methodologies, which continue to position the indigenous as 'Other'. In setting an agenda for planning and implementing indigenous research, the author shows how such programmes are part of the wider project of reclaiming control over indigenous ways of knowing and being.

Exploring the broad range of issues which have confronted, and continue to confront, indigenous peoples, in their encounters with western knowledge, this book also sets a standard for truly emancipatory research. It brilliantly demonstrates that ‘when indigenous peoples become the researchers and not merely the researched, the activity of research is transformed.’

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