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What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained

by and

What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Einstein's cook was lucky. But you, too, can have a scientist in your kitchen: Robert L. Wolke. Does the alcohol really boil off when we cook with wine? Are smoked foods raw or cooked? Are green potatoes poisonous? With the reliability that only a scientist can provide, Robert L. Wolke provides plain-talk explanations of kitchen mysteries with a liberal seasoning of wit. A professor of chemistry and a lifelong gastronome, he has answered hundreds of questions about food and cooking in his syndicated Washington Post column, "Food 101."

Now, organized into basic categories for easy reference, What Einstein Told His Cook contains more than 130 lucid explanations of kitchen phenomena involving starches and sugars, salts, fats, meats and fish, heat and cold, cooking equipment, and more. Along the way, Wolke debunks some widely held myths about foods and cooking.

Whether kept in the kitchen or on the reference shelf, What Einstein Told His Cook will be a friendly scientist at your elbow. 20 illustrations.

Review:

"Wolke is good at demystifying advertisers' half-truths, showing, for example, that sea salt is not necessarily better than regular salt for those watching sodium intake....Wolke tells it like it is....With its zest for the truth, this book will help cooks learn how to make more intelligent choices." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Wolke writes about these serious topics with a good sense of humor that doesn't belittle the seriousness of his purpose." Mark Knoblauch, Booklist

Synopsis:

Einstein's cook was lucky. But you, too, can have a scientist in your kitchen: Robert L. Wolke.

Synopsis:

Einstein's cook was lucky. But you, too, can have a scientist in your kitchen: Robert L. Wolke.

Synopsis:

Do you wish you understood the science of foods, but don't want to plow through dry technical books? is like having a scientist at your side to answer your questions in plain, nontechnical terms. Chemistry professor and syndicated food columnist Robert L. Wolke provides over 100 reliable and witty explanations, while debunking misconceptions and helping you to see through confusing advertising and labeling. In "Sweet Talk" you will learn that your taste buds don't behave the way you thought they did, that starch is made of sugar, and that raw sugar isn't raw. Did you know that roads have been paved with molasses? Why do cooked foods turn brown? What do we owe to Christopher Columbus's mother-in-law? In "The Salt of the Earth" you will learn about the strange salts in your supermarket. Does sea salt really come from the sea? (Don't bet on it.) Why do we salt the water for boiling pasta? And how can you remove excess salt from oversalted soup? (You may be surprised.) In "The Fat of the Land" you will learn the difference between a fat and a fatty acid, what makes them saturated or unsaturated, and that nonfat cooking sprays are mostly fat. Why don't the amounts of fats on food labels add up? Why does European butter taste better than ours? In "Chemicals in the Kitchen" you will learn what's in your tap water, how baking powder and baking soda differ, and what MSG does to food. What Japanese taste sensation is sweeping this country? Is your balsamic vinegar fake? Why do potato chips have green edges? In "Turf and Surf" you will learn why red meat is red, why ground beef may look as if it came from the Old Gray Mare, and how bones contribute to flavor. Want a juicy turkey with smooth gravy? How does one deal with a live clam, oyster, crab, or lobster? In "Fire and Ice" you will learn how to buy a range and the difference between charcoal and gas for grilling. Did you know that all the alcohol does not boil off when you cook with wine? How about a surprising way to defrost frozen foods? And yes, hot water can freeze before cold water. In "Liquid Refreshment" you will learn about the acids and caffeine in coffee, and why "herb teas" are not teas. Does drinking soda contribute to global warming? Why does champagne foam up? Should you sniff the wine cork? How can you find out how much alcohol there is in your drink? In "Those Mysterious Microwaves" you will learn what microwaves do--and don't do--to your food. What makes a container "microwave safe"? Why mustn't you put metal in a microwave oven? How can you keep microwave-heated water from blowing up in your face? In "Tools and Technology" you will learn why nothing sticks to nonstick cookware, and what the pressure-cooker manufacturers don't tell you. What's the latest research on juicing limes? Why are "instant read" thermometers so slow? Can you cook with magnetism and light? What does irradiation do to our foods?

About the Author

Robert L. Wolke is professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and winner of the James Beard Foundation and Bert Greene awards for food journalism.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393011838
Other:
Wolke, Robert L.
Author:
Parrish, Marlene
Author:
Wolke, Robert L.
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Location:
New York
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
Cookery
Subject:
Science
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
History
Subject:
Food Science
Subject:
Cookbooks
Subject:
Cooking and Food-General
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
no. 02-01
Publication Date:
May 2002
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
9.5 x 6.5 x 1.3 in 1.51 lb

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Related Subjects


Cooking and Food » Food Writing » Gastronomic Literature
Cooking and Food » General
Cooking and Food » Methods » Miscellaneous Methods
Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » General
Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
Reference » Science Reference » Technology

What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$9.95 In Stock
Product details 320 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393011838 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Wolke is good at demystifying advertisers' half-truths, showing, for example, that sea salt is not necessarily better than regular salt for those watching sodium intake....Wolke tells it like it is....With its zest for the truth, this book will help cooks learn how to make more intelligent choices."
"Review" by , "Wolke writes about these serious topics with a good sense of humor that doesn't belittle the seriousness of his purpose."
"Synopsis" by , Einstein's cook was lucky. But you, too, can have a scientist in your kitchen: Robert L. Wolke.
"Synopsis" by , Einstein's cook was lucky. But you, too, can have a scientist in your kitchen: Robert L. Wolke.
"Synopsis" by , Do you wish you understood the science of foods, but don't want to plow through dry technical books? is like having a scientist at your side to answer your questions in plain, nontechnical terms. Chemistry professor and syndicated food columnist Robert L. Wolke provides over 100 reliable and witty explanations, while debunking misconceptions and helping you to see through confusing advertising and labeling. In "Sweet Talk" you will learn that your taste buds don't behave the way you thought they did, that starch is made of sugar, and that raw sugar isn't raw. Did you know that roads have been paved with molasses? Why do cooked foods turn brown? What do we owe to Christopher Columbus's mother-in-law? In "The Salt of the Earth" you will learn about the strange salts in your supermarket. Does sea salt really come from the sea? (Don't bet on it.) Why do we salt the water for boiling pasta? And how can you remove excess salt from oversalted soup? (You may be surprised.) In "The Fat of the Land" you will learn the difference between a fat and a fatty acid, what makes them saturated or unsaturated, and that nonfat cooking sprays are mostly fat. Why don't the amounts of fats on food labels add up? Why does European butter taste better than ours? In "Chemicals in the Kitchen" you will learn what's in your tap water, how baking powder and baking soda differ, and what MSG does to food. What Japanese taste sensation is sweeping this country? Is your balsamic vinegar fake? Why do potato chips have green edges? In "Turf and Surf" you will learn why red meat is red, why ground beef may look as if it came from the Old Gray Mare, and how bones contribute to flavor. Want a juicy turkey with smooth gravy? How does one deal with a live clam, oyster, crab, or lobster? In "Fire and Ice" you will learn how to buy a range and the difference between charcoal and gas for grilling. Did you know that all the alcohol does not boil off when you cook with wine? How about a surprising way to defrost frozen foods? And yes, hot water can freeze before cold water. In "Liquid Refreshment" you will learn about the acids and caffeine in coffee, and why "herb teas" are not teas. Does drinking soda contribute to global warming? Why does champagne foam up? Should you sniff the wine cork? How can you find out how much alcohol there is in your drink? In "Those Mysterious Microwaves" you will learn what microwaves do--and don't do--to your food. What makes a container "microwave safe"? Why mustn't you put metal in a microwave oven? How can you keep microwave-heated water from blowing up in your face? In "Tools and Technology" you will learn why nothing sticks to nonstick cookware, and what the pressure-cooker manufacturers don't tell you. What's the latest research on juicing limes? Why are "instant read" thermometers so slow? Can you cook with magnetism and light? What does irradiation do to our foods?
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