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Traditional Indonesian Textiles

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Traditional Indonesian Textiles Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The reverence accorded to textile art on the islands is reflected in every area of production; precision of weave and exquisite patterning are testimony to superlative craftsmanship. Lying at the heart of a vast network of trading routes, Indonesia has absorbed a wealth of foreign influences that have spawned an eclectic culture uniquely mirrored in its textile art.

Beautiful cloud shapes characteristic of Chinese painting reappear in Javanese batik, while Ming porcelain and Chinese embroideries have provided inspiration for many wonderful patterns. Indian symbols - the tree of life, the naga snake, the sacred mountain, the lotus - have all been rendered as textile motifs. Geometric forms, human and animal figures and even Dutch Art Deco designs can also be found.

Synopsis:

The fabrics of Indonesia, at one time the preserve of scholarly enthusiasts, have now won universal popularity, so much so that local names for techniques of resist-dyeing - batik, ikat, plangi and tritik - have been adopted internationally as generic terms. The reverence accorded to textile art on the islands is reflected in every area of production; precision of weave and exquisite patterning are testimony to superlative craftsmanship. Lying at the heart of a vast network of trading routes, Indonesia has absorbed a wealth of foreign influences that have spawned an eclectic culture uniquely mirrored in its textile art. Beautiful cloud shapes characteristic of Chinese painting reappear in Javanese batik, while Ming porcelain and Chinese embroideries have provided inspiration for many wonderful patterns. Indian symbols - the tree of life, the naga snake, the sacred mountain, the lotus - have all been rendered as textile motifs. Geometric forms, human and animal figures and even Dutch Art Deco designs can also be found. John Gillow begins his account - based on firsthand research often conducted in isolated areas - with a complete history of textile production in the Indonesian archipelago. He describes the various materials, dyes and looms, and details their use in the creation of batik and the many other richly patterned cloths, from Javanese silks and the hinggi mantles of the Sumban kings to Balinese Iamak banners and the gold-thread brocades of Sumatra. Specifics of their embellishment are followed by a guide to the islands and their products. More than one hundred and fifty dazzling photographs specially taken by Barry Dawson illustrate these marvels of time-honored workmanship, while a reference section including a bibliography and guide to collections provides indispensable factual background. This refreshing insight into a glorious tradition of ethnic craft will captivate students, travelers, collectors, designers, and all who appreciate textile art at its finest.

Synopsis:

The fabrics of Indonesia have long held an allure. They have now won universal popularity, so much so that local names for techniques of dying and weaving - batik, ikat, tritik - have been adopted internationally as generic terms.

Synopsis:

The rich array of design in reflected in this book. Over 200 photographs illustrate the cloud shapes, geometric forms, human and animal figures, Indian symbols and even Dutch Art Deco designs that have been rendered as textile motifs. Based on first-hand research, often conducted in remote areas, John Gillow's account comprises a history of textile production in the Indonesian archipelago, from Balinese double-ikats and Javanese silks to the gold-thread brocades of Sumatra.

About the Author

John Gillow researches and collects traditional textiles from India and Southeast Asia, and lectures and exhibits his collections in Europe. He lives in England.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780500278208
Author:
Gillow, John
Publisher:
Thames & Hudson
Author:
Rivers, Victoria Z.
Author:
Dawson, Barry
Subject:
Asian
Subject:
Design - Textile & Costume
Subject:
Textile fabrics
Subject:
History - Asian
Subject:
Indonesia
Subject:
Textile & Costume
Subject:
Art-History and Criticism
Copyright:
Publication Date:
19950417
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Over 200 color illustrations
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
11.71x8.30x.56 in. 1.70 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Crafts » Textiles

Traditional Indonesian Textiles New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$21.95 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Thames & Hudson - English 9780500278208 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The fabrics of Indonesia, at one time the preserve of scholarly enthusiasts, have now won universal popularity, so much so that local names for techniques of resist-dyeing - batik, ikat, plangi and tritik - have been adopted internationally as generic terms. The reverence accorded to textile art on the islands is reflected in every area of production; precision of weave and exquisite patterning are testimony to superlative craftsmanship. Lying at the heart of a vast network of trading routes, Indonesia has absorbed a wealth of foreign influences that have spawned an eclectic culture uniquely mirrored in its textile art. Beautiful cloud shapes characteristic of Chinese painting reappear in Javanese batik, while Ming porcelain and Chinese embroideries have provided inspiration for many wonderful patterns. Indian symbols - the tree of life, the naga snake, the sacred mountain, the lotus - have all been rendered as textile motifs. Geometric forms, human and animal figures and even Dutch Art Deco designs can also be found. John Gillow begins his account - based on firsthand research often conducted in isolated areas - with a complete history of textile production in the Indonesian archipelago. He describes the various materials, dyes and looms, and details their use in the creation of batik and the many other richly patterned cloths, from Javanese silks and the hinggi mantles of the Sumban kings to Balinese Iamak banners and the gold-thread brocades of Sumatra. Specifics of their embellishment are followed by a guide to the islands and their products. More than one hundred and fifty dazzling photographs specially taken by Barry Dawson illustrate these marvels of time-honored workmanship, while a reference section including a bibliography and guide to collections provides indispensable factual background. This refreshing insight into a glorious tradition of ethnic craft will captivate students, travelers, collectors, designers, and all who appreciate textile art at its finest.
"Synopsis" by , The fabrics of Indonesia have long held an allure. They have now won universal popularity, so much so that local names for techniques of dying and weaving - batik, ikat, tritik - have been adopted internationally as generic terms.
"Synopsis" by , The rich array of design in reflected in this book. Over 200 photographs illustrate the cloud shapes, geometric forms, human and animal figures, Indian symbols and even Dutch Art Deco designs that have been rendered as textile motifs. Based on first-hand research, often conducted in remote areas, John Gillow's account comprises a history of textile production in the Indonesian archipelago, from Balinese double-ikats and Javanese silks to the gold-thread brocades of Sumatra.
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