Wintersalen Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Interviews | October 28, 2014

    Jill Owens: IMG Miriam Toews: The Powells.com Interview



    Some people are compelled by a restlessness from within; others are shaped by the unwieldy forces around them. In Miriam Toews's poignant new novel... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$19.95
Used Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Western Civilization- Medieval

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

The Image of the Medieval Peasant as Alien and Exemplary (Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture)

by

The Image of the Medieval Peasant as Alien and Exemplary (Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The medieval clergy, aristocracy, and commercial classes tended to regard peasants as objects of contempt and derision. In religious writings, satires, sermons, chronicles, and artistic representations peasants often appeared as dirty, foolish, dishonest, even as subhuman or bestial. Their lowliness was commonly regarded as a natural corollary of the drudgery of their agricultural toil.

Yet, at the same time, the peasantry was not viewed as “other” in the manner of other condemned groups, such as Jews, lepers, Muslims, or the imagined “monstrous races” of the East. Several crucial characteristics of the peasantry rendered it less clearly alien from the elite perspective: peasants were not a minority, their work in the fields nourished all other social orders, and, most important, they were Christians. In other respects, peasants could be regarded as meritorious by virtue of their simple life, productive work, and unjust suffering at the hands of their exploitive social superiors. Their unrewarded sacrifice and piety were also sometimes thought to place them closest to God and more likely to win salvation.

This book examines these conflicting images of peasants from the post-Carolingian period to the German Peasants War. It relates the representation of peasants to debates about how society should be organized (specifically, to how human equality at Creation led to subordination), how slavery and serfdom could be assailed or defended, and how peasants themselves structured and justified their demands.

Though it was argued that peasants were legitimately subjugated by reason of nature or some primordial curse (such as that of Noah against his son Ham), there was also considerable unease about how the exploitation of those who were not completely alien—who were, after all, Christians—could be explained. Laments over peasant suffering as expressed in the literature might have a stylized quality, but this book shows how they were appropriated and shaped by peasants themselves, especially in the large-scale rebellions that characterized the late Middle Ages.

Synopsis:

This book examines the conflicting images of peasants from the post-Carolingian period to the German Peasants' War—how they were represented as subhuman yet as close to God; as contemptible yet as exemplary Christians—and how such views formed the basis for social movements.

Synopsis:

Examines the conflicting images of peasants from the post-Carolingian period to the German Peasants' War.

Synopsis:

“Freedmans command of material drawn from all over Europe is impressive and anyone interested in the medieval or early modern German peasantry will profit greatly from reading this book.”—Central European History

About the Author

Paul Freedman is Professor of History at Yale University and the author, most recently, of Church, Law, and Society in Catalonia, 900-1500.

Table of Contents

Introduction: marginality and centrality of peasants; Part I. Peasant Labor and a Hierarchical Society: 1. Peasant labor and the limits of mutuality; 2. The breakdown of mutuality: laments over the mistreatment of peasants; Part II. The Origins of Inequality: 3. Equality and freedom at creation; 4. The curse of Noah; 5. National myths and the origins of serfdom; Part III. Unfavorable Images of Peasants: 6. Representations of contempt and subjugation; 7. Peasant bodies, male and female; Part IV. Peasant Agency, Peasant Humanity: 8. Peasant warriors and peasant liberties; 9. Pious and exemplary peasants; Part V. The Revolt Against Servitude: 10. The problem of servitude: arbitrary mistreatment, symbolic degradation; 11. Peasant rebellions of the late middle ages; Conclusion: harmony and dissonance.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780804733731
Author:
Freedman, Paul
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
Location:
Stanford, Calif. :
Subject:
Medieval
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
Civilization, medieval
Subject:
Peasantry
Subject:
Literature, medieval
Subject:
Peasants in literature
Subject:
Literature, Medieval -- History and criticism.
Subject:
World History - Medieval and Renaissance
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture (Paperback)
Publication Date:
19990131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
484
Dimensions:
9.00 x 6.00 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Making of Europe: Conquest,... New Mass Market $20.50
  2. Crusades: A Short History Used Hardcover $6.50
  3. The Vinland Sagas: The Norse... Used Trade Paper $4.50
  4. Premodern Sexualities (96 Edition) Used Trade Paper $33.00
  5. Shadow and Claw: The First Half of...
    Used Trade Paper $10.00

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Western Civilization » Medieval
History and Social Science » World History » Medieval and Renaissance

The Image of the Medieval Peasant as Alien and Exemplary (Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.95 In Stock
Product details 484 pages Stanford University Press - English 9780804733731 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
This book examines the conflicting images of peasants from the post-Carolingian period to the German Peasants' War—how they were represented as subhuman yet as close to God; as contemptible yet as exemplary Christians—and how such views formed the basis for social movements.
"Synopsis" by , Examines the conflicting images of peasants from the post-Carolingian period to the German Peasants' War.
"Synopsis" by ,
“Freedmans command of material drawn from all over Europe is impressive and anyone interested in the medieval or early modern German peasantry will profit greatly from reading this book.”—Central European History
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.