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25 Remote Warehouse African American Studies- General

Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America

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Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this ground-breaking study, Sterling Stuckey, a leading cultural historian and authority on slavery, explains how different African peoples interacted on the plantations of the South to achieve a common culture. He argues that, at the time of emancipation, slaves still remained essentially African in culture, a conclusion with profound implications for theories of black liberation and for the future of race relations in America.

Drawing evidence from the anthropology and art history of Central and West African cultural traditions and exploring the folklore of the American slave, Stuckey reveals an intrinsic Pan-African impulse that contributed to the formation of the black ethos in slavery. He presents fascinating profiles of such nineteenth-century figures as David Walker, Henry Highland Garnet, and Frederick Douglass, as well as detailed examinations into the lives and careers of W.E.B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson in this century.

Review:

"A rich, provocative, and in many ways seminal interpretation that may force a reconsideration of the depths of African culture in America." Library Journal

Review:

"An interpretation of considerable originality. [Stuckey] brings a broad knowledge of, and a wonderful ear for, poetry, music, dance, and folklore....I cannot do justice to Stuckey's contributions to scholarship, much less to the pleasure that awaits those who avail themselves of his subtle and nuanced readings." Eugene Genovese, The New Republic

Review:

"Thoughtful tracing of the roots of black nationalist feelings in America over several centuries." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

How were blacks in American slavery formed, out of a multiplicity of African ethnic peoples, into a single people? In this major study of Afro-American culture, Sterling Stuckey, a leading thinker on black nationalism for the past twenty years, explains how different African peoples interacted during the nineteenth century to achieve a common culture. He finds that, at the time of emancipation, slaves were still overwhelmingly African in culture, a conclusion with profound implications for theories of black liberation and for the future of race relations in America.

By examining anthropological evidence about Central and West African cultural traditions--Bakongo, Ibo, Dahomean, Mendi and others--and exploring the folklore of the American slave, Stuckey has arrived at an important new cross-cultural analysis of the Pan-African impulse among slaves that contributed to the formation of a black ethos. He establishes, for example, the centrality of an ancient African ritual--the Ring Shout or Circle Dance--to the black American religious and artistic experience.

Black nationalist theories, the author points out, are those most in tune with the implication of an African presence in America during and since slavery. Casting a fresh new light on these ideas, Stuckey provides us with fascinating profiles of such nineteenth century figures as David Walker, Henry Highland Garnet, and Frederick Douglas. He then considers in detail the lives and careers of W. E. B. Dubois and Paul Robeson in this century, describing their ambition that blacks in American society, while struggling to end racism, take on roles that truly reflected their African heritage. These concepts of black liberation, Stuckey suggests, are far more relevant to the intrinsic values of black people than integrationist thought on race relations.

But in a final revelation he concludes that, with the exception of Paul Robeson, the ironic tendency of black nationalists has been to underestimate the depths of African culture in black Americans and the sophistication of the slave community they arose from.

Synopsis:

In this ground-breaking study, Sterling Stuckey, a leading cultural historian and authority on slavery, explains how different African peoples interacted on the plantations of the South to achieve a common culture. He argues that, at the time of emancipation, slaves still remained essentially African in culture, a conclusion with profound implications for theories of black liberation and for the future of race relations in America.

Drawing evidence from the anthropology and art history of Central and West African cultural traditions and exploring the folklore of the American slave, Stuckey reveals an intrinsic Pan-African impulse that contributed to the formation of the black ethos in slavery. He presents fascinating profiles of such nineteenth-century figures as David Walker, Henry Highland Garnet, and Frederick Douglass, as well as detailed examinations into the lives and careers of W.E.B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson in this century.

About the Author

Sterling Stuckey is Professor of History at Northwestern University. Stuckey is also editor of The Ideological Origins of Black Nationalism.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195056648
Author:
Sterling, Stuckey
Author:
Stuckey, Sterling
Author:
null, Sterling
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Africa
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
Social conditions
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
History, American | African American
Subject:
African American Studies-Black Heritage
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Bibliography: p. 359-413.
Series Volume:
vol. 13-A.
Publication Date:
19881231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
11 tables
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
5.31 x 8 x 0.87 in 1.3 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » US History » General

Slave Culture: Nationalist Theory and the Foundations of Black America New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
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Product details 448 pages Oxford University Press - English 9780195056648 Reviews:
"Review" by , "A rich, provocative, and in many ways seminal interpretation that may force a reconsideration of the depths of African culture in America."
"Review" by , "An interpretation of considerable originality. [Stuckey] brings a broad knowledge of, and a wonderful ear for, poetry, music, dance, and folklore....I cannot do justice to Stuckey's contributions to scholarship, much less to the pleasure that awaits those who avail themselves of his subtle and nuanced readings."
"Review" by , "Thoughtful tracing of the roots of black nationalist feelings in America over several centuries."
"Synopsis" by , How were blacks in American slavery formed, out of a multiplicity of African ethnic peoples, into a single people? In this major study of Afro-American culture, Sterling Stuckey, a leading thinker on black nationalism for the past twenty years, explains how different African peoples interacted during the nineteenth century to achieve a common culture. He finds that, at the time of emancipation, slaves were still overwhelmingly African in culture, a conclusion with profound implications for theories of black liberation and for the future of race relations in America.

By examining anthropological evidence about Central and West African cultural traditions--Bakongo, Ibo, Dahomean, Mendi and others--and exploring the folklore of the American slave, Stuckey has arrived at an important new cross-cultural analysis of the Pan-African impulse among slaves that contributed to the formation of a black ethos. He establishes, for example, the centrality of an ancient African ritual--the Ring Shout or Circle Dance--to the black American religious and artistic experience.

Black nationalist theories, the author points out, are those most in tune with the implication of an African presence in America during and since slavery. Casting a fresh new light on these ideas, Stuckey provides us with fascinating profiles of such nineteenth century figures as David Walker, Henry Highland Garnet, and Frederick Douglas. He then considers in detail the lives and careers of W. E. B. Dubois and Paul Robeson in this century, describing their ambition that blacks in American society, while struggling to end racism, take on roles that truly reflected their African heritage. These concepts of black liberation, Stuckey suggests, are far more relevant to the intrinsic values of black people than integrationist thought on race relations.

But in a final revelation he concludes that, with the exception of Paul Robeson, the ironic tendency of black nationalists has been to underestimate the depths of African culture in black Americans and the sophistication of the slave community they arose from.

"Synopsis" by , In this ground-breaking study, Sterling Stuckey, a leading cultural historian and authority on slavery, explains how different African peoples interacted on the plantations of the South to achieve a common culture. He argues that, at the time of emancipation, slaves still remained essentially African in culture, a conclusion with profound implications for theories of black liberation and for the future of race relations in America.

Drawing evidence from the anthropology and art history of Central and West African cultural traditions and exploring the folklore of the American slave, Stuckey reveals an intrinsic Pan-African impulse that contributed to the formation of the black ethos in slavery. He presents fascinating profiles of such nineteenth-century figures as David Walker, Henry Highland Garnet, and Frederick Douglass, as well as detailed examinations into the lives and careers of W.E.B. Du Bois and Paul Robeson in this century.

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