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Freedom Summer

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Freedom Summer Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In June 1964, over 1,000 volunteers--most of them white, northern college students--arrived in Mississippi to register black voters and staff "freedom schools" as part of the Freedom Summer campaign organized by the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Within 10 days, three of them

were murdered; by the summer's end, another had died and hundreds more had endured bombings, beatings, and arrests. Less dramatically, but no less significantly, the volunteers encountered a "liberating" exposure to new lifestyles, new political ideologies, and a radically new perspective on

America and on themselves. The summer transformed them, and, as this riveting book shows, forged a crucial link between the Civil Rights Movement and the other social movements that would soon sweep the nation.

Here is the first book to gauge the impact of Freedom Summer on the project volunteers and the period we now call "the turbulent '60s." Who were the volunteers? What were their experiences? And what happened to them after the project ended? To answer these questions, Doug McAdam tracked

down hundreds of the original project applicants, and combining hard data with a wealth of personal recollections, he has produced a fascinating portrait of the people, the events, and the era.

As they embarked on the campaign, McAdam found, the volunteers were mostly liberal reformers--not radicals. As such, they typified the idealism of the early '60s. During Freedom Summer, however, their encounters with white supremacist violence and their experiences with interracial

relationships, communal living, and a more open sexuality led many of the volunteers to "climb aboard a political and cultural wave just as it was forming and beginning to wash forward." Many became activists in subsequent protests--the antiwar movement, the feminist movement--and helped set their

tone. Most significantly, McAdam found, many of the participants have remained activists to this day; for them, the "big chill" never occurred.

Brimming with the reminiscences of the Freedom Summer veterans, the book captures the varied motives that compelled them to make the journey south, the terror that came with the explosions of violence, the camaraderie and conflicts they experienced among themselves, and their assorted feelings

about the lessons they learned. This book is an engrossing re-creation of some remarkable lives caught up in a remarkable series of events as well as a penetrating analysis of why those events were significant. It is must reading for anyone seeking to understand the legacy of the '60s.

Synopsis:

In June 1964, over one thousand volunteers--most of them white, northern college students--arrived in Mississippi to register black voters and staff "freedom schools" as part of the Freedom Summer campaign organized by the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Within ten days, three of them were murdered; by the summer's end, another had died and hundreds more had endured bombings, beatings, and arrests. Less dramatically, but no less significantly, the volunteers encountered a "liberating" exposure to new lifestyles, new political ideologies, and a radically new perspective on America and on themselves.

Films such as Mississippi Burning have attempted to document this episode in the civil rights era, but Doug McAdam offers the first book to gauge the impact of Freedom Summer on the project volunteers and the period we now call "the turbulent sixties." Tracking down hundreds of the original project applicants, and combining hard data with a wealth of personal recollections, he has produced a riveting portrait of the people, the events, and the era. McAdam discovered that during Freedom Summer, the volunteers' encounters with white supremacist violence and their experiences with interracial relationships, communal living, and a more open sexuality led many of them to "climb aboard a political and cultural wave just as it was forming and beginning to wash forward." Many became activists in subsequent protests--including the antiwar movement and the feminist movement--and, most significantly, many of them have remained activists to this day.

Brimming with the reminiscences of the Freedom Summer veterans, the book captures the varied motives that compelled them to make the journey south, the terror that came with the explosions of violence, the camaraderie and conflicts they experienced among themselves, and their assorted feelings about the lessons they learned.

Synopsis:

In June 1964, over one thousand volunteers--most of them white, northern college students--arrived in Mississippi to register black voters and staff "freedom schools" as part of the Freedom Summer campaign organized by the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Within ten days, three of them were murdered; by the summer's end, another had died and hundreds more had endured bombings, beatings, and arrests. Less dramatically, but no less significantly, the volunteers encountered a "liberating" exposure to new lifestyles, new political ideologies, and a radically new perspective on America and on themselves.

Films such as Mississippi Burning have attempted to document this episode in the civil rights era, but Doug McAdam offers the first book to gauge the impact of Freedom Summer on the project volunteers and the period we now call "the turbulent sixties." Tracking down hundreds of the original project applicants, and combining hard data with a wealth of personal recollections, he has produced a riveting portrait of the people, the events, and the era. McAdam discovered that during Freedom Summer, the volunteers' encounters with white supremacist violence and their experiences with interracial relationships, communal living, and a more open sexuality led many of them to "climb aboard a political and cultural wave just as it was forming and beginning to wash forward." Many became activists in subsequent protests--including the antiwar movement and the feminist movement--and, most significantly, many of them have remained activists to this day.

Brimming with the reminiscences of the Freedom Summer veterans, the book captures the varied motives that compelled them to make the journey south, the terror that came with the explosions of violence, the camaraderie and conflicts they experienced among themselves, and their assorted feelings about the lessons they learned.

About the Author

Doug McAdam is Professor of Sociology at the University of Arizona and author of Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency, 1930-1970.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195064728
Author:
McAdam, Doug
Author:
McAdam, Douglas
Author:
null, Doug
Author:
McAdam, Doug
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Location:
New York :
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - 20th Century/60s
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Civil rights workers
Subject:
Discrimination & Racism
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
Sociology | Political
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Subject:
Americana-General
Edition Description:
Bibliography: p. 311-322.
Series Volume:
1202
Publication Date:
19900931
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 photos
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
5.38 x 8 x 0.73 in 1.1 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » Civil Rights Movement
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Americana » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Racism and Ethnic Conflict
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » US History » 1945 to Present
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

Freedom Summer New Trade Paper
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$26.25 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Oxford University Press - English 9780195064728 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In June 1964, over one thousand volunteers--most of them white, northern college students--arrived in Mississippi to register black voters and staff "freedom schools" as part of the Freedom Summer campaign organized by the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Within ten days, three of them were murdered; by the summer's end, another had died and hundreds more had endured bombings, beatings, and arrests. Less dramatically, but no less significantly, the volunteers encountered a "liberating" exposure to new lifestyles, new political ideologies, and a radically new perspective on America and on themselves.

Films such as Mississippi Burning have attempted to document this episode in the civil rights era, but Doug McAdam offers the first book to gauge the impact of Freedom Summer on the project volunteers and the period we now call "the turbulent sixties." Tracking down hundreds of the original project applicants, and combining hard data with a wealth of personal recollections, he has produced a riveting portrait of the people, the events, and the era. McAdam discovered that during Freedom Summer, the volunteers' encounters with white supremacist violence and their experiences with interracial relationships, communal living, and a more open sexuality led many of them to "climb aboard a political and cultural wave just as it was forming and beginning to wash forward." Many became activists in subsequent protests--including the antiwar movement and the feminist movement--and, most significantly, many of them have remained activists to this day.

Brimming with the reminiscences of the Freedom Summer veterans, the book captures the varied motives that compelled them to make the journey south, the terror that came with the explosions of violence, the camaraderie and conflicts they experienced among themselves, and their assorted feelings about the lessons they learned.

"Synopsis" by , In June 1964, over one thousand volunteers--most of them white, northern college students--arrived in Mississippi to register black voters and staff "freedom schools" as part of the Freedom Summer campaign organized by the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Within ten days, three of them were murdered; by the summer's end, another had died and hundreds more had endured bombings, beatings, and arrests. Less dramatically, but no less significantly, the volunteers encountered a "liberating" exposure to new lifestyles, new political ideologies, and a radically new perspective on America and on themselves.

Films such as Mississippi Burning have attempted to document this episode in the civil rights era, but Doug McAdam offers the first book to gauge the impact of Freedom Summer on the project volunteers and the period we now call "the turbulent sixties." Tracking down hundreds of the original project applicants, and combining hard data with a wealth of personal recollections, he has produced a riveting portrait of the people, the events, and the era. McAdam discovered that during Freedom Summer, the volunteers' encounters with white supremacist violence and their experiences with interracial relationships, communal living, and a more open sexuality led many of them to "climb aboard a political and cultural wave just as it was forming and beginning to wash forward." Many became activists in subsequent protests--including the antiwar movement and the feminist movement--and, most significantly, many of them have remained activists to this day.

Brimming with the reminiscences of the Freedom Summer veterans, the book captures the varied motives that compelled them to make the journey south, the terror that came with the explosions of violence, the camaraderie and conflicts they experienced among themselves, and their assorted feelings about the lessons they learned.

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