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Writing for the Stage : a Practical Playwriting Guide (06 Edition)

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Writing for the Stage : a Practical Playwriting Guide (06 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

With skills-focused exercises ranging from beginning to advanced levels, Writing for the Stage takes students through the creative process to develop a stageworthy script. The purpose of Writing for the Stage: A Practical Playwriting Guide is to provide students with a variety of exercises to help develop writing skills for the stage that eventually lead to the creation of a script. Although there is no magic formula—no right or wrong way to create a dramatic work—there are still traditional expectations for plot, conflict, theme, character development, dialogue, and so forth, that need to be discussed.

Features

  • Provides both a theoretical framework and practical exercises for developing skills, helping students to gain a complete understanding of the creative process.
  • Includes exercises at beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels for each topic, allowing instructors to choose the most appropriate exercises for their students.
  • Looks at the relationship of writing to the practical realities of today’s theatre, making students aware of how the realities of staging and budget must be considered in writing for today's theatre.
  • Explores three kinds of conflict—internal, personal, and external—and conflict within society, providing many choices for developing dramatic situations.
  • Discusses not only the “masculine” linear approach to playwriting but also “feminine” and non-linear structure, providing exercises for non-traditional, experimental scene development, opening students' eyes to exploring structure and character in more creative, experimental ways.
  • Devotes an entire chapter to writing monologues, including short monologues within plays and long, one-person plays, providing extra guidance in this important technique.
  • Offers extensive material on exploring character that is more detailed than in other texts, especially in the depth of physical, social, and psychological character development, providing students with a starting place to create characters.

Praise for Writing for the Stage: A Practical Playwriting Guide

“I haven’t seen a more thorough text than Writing for the Stage. The exercises it suggests for student writers are ingenious and. . .of great benefit to anyone trying to develop the skills required to develop character, maintain audience interest and involvement, reveal exposition subtly, create a plausible and aesthetically satisfying plot structure, and so on. . . .”

David Wagoner, University of Washington

“This book is distinguished and. . .is a superior and useful text because it is honest, very thorough, step-by-step, and comprehensive. It is wise about the way theatre works today. . . .”

Richard Kalinoski, University of Wisconsin—Oshkosh

Book News Annotation:

Clark (Florida International U.) focuses on practical skills in this undergraduate text and reference, which includes exercises at beginning, intermediate and advanced levels for each topic. He briefly covers the essential elements of drama, including the three levels of conflict, turning point, and climax, then describes getting an idea for a play, planning and preparing the first draft, and getting the manuscript into a professional format. He describes plot, structure, characters' sociological, psychological and physical characteristics, character orchestration, dialogue and monologues, settings and other technical matters, genre and style, writing and rewriting, and opportunities for presentation in readings, contests, and other venues. He includes a sample course syllabus and information on outcomes and assessment for instructors.
Annotation 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

Clark (Florida International U.) focuses on practical skills in this undergraduate text and reference, which includes exercises at beginning, intermediate and advanced levels for each topic. He briefly covers the essential elements of drama, including the three levels of conflict, turning point, and climax, then describes getting an idea for a play, planning and preparing the first draft, and getting the manuscript into a professional format. He describes plot, structure, characters' sociological, psychological and physical characteristics, character orchestration, dialogue and monologues, settings and other technical matters, genre and style, writing and rewriting, and opportunities for presentation in readings, contests, and other venues. He includes a sample course syllabus and information on outcomes and assessment for instructors. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

With skills-focused exercises ranging from beginning to advanced levels, Writing for the Stage takes students through the creative process to develop a stageworthy script. The purpose of Writing for the Stage: A Practical Playwriting Guide is to provide students with a variety of exercises to help develop writing skills for the stage that eventually lead to the creation of a script. Although there is no magic formula — no right or wrong way to create a dramatic work-- there are still traditional expectations for plot, conflict, theme, character development, dialogue, etc. that need to be discussed.

Synopsis:

With skills-focused exercises ranging from beginning to advanced levels, Writing for the Stage takes students through the creative process to develop a stageworthy script. The Essence of Drama; Getting the Idea; Planning the First Draft; The Professional Format; Rhythm; Plot; Structure; Physical Character; Sociological Characteristics; Psychological Character; Orchestrating Characters; Dialogue; Monologues; Settings and Costumes; Genre and Style; Spine and Premise; Writing and Rewriting; Getting Your Play Produced. Introductory playwriting.

Table of Contents

Each chapter concludes with "Summary."

 

UNIT ONE.

 

1. The Essence of Drama.   

     

Conflict.

The Inciting Action.

The Goal.

The Central Action.

The Turning Point.

The Climax.

Three Kinds of Conflict.

Inner Conflict.

Personal and External Conflict.

Conflict within Society.

Common Problems.

Rising Conflict.

Static Conflict.

Solutions.

 

2. Getting the Idea.

Personal Experience.

Observations and Images.

Research.

The Journal.

 

3. Planning The First Draft.

Working Title.

Character Names and Descriptions.

Holding The Attention.

The First Scene.

Plot Scenario.

 

4. The Professional Format.

Format Guidelines.

Sample Scene.

 

UNIT TWO.

 

5. Rhythm.

Horizontal and Vertical Movement.

 

6. Plot.

Arrangement of the Incidents.

Kinds of Plots.

Beginning, Middle and End.

Obstacles.               

The Essential Scene.

Common Plot Problems.

Other Tips.

 

7. Structure.

Masculine Structure.

Linear Approach.

Ignition.

Point of Attack.

Scene.

Beats.

The Progression.

Resolution.

Exposition.

Foreshadowing.

Story Values.

The Unities.

The Play in Today’s Theatre.

Feminine Structure.

Non-Linear Approaches.

Circular Structure.

Episodic Structure.

 

UNIT THREE.

 

8. Physical Character.

Developing Character.

Characterization.

Physical Characteristics.

 

9. Sociological Characteristics.                                

Characteristics.

Life Script.

 

10. Psychological Character.

Characteristics.

The Johari Window.               

Defense Mechanisms.

Unrealistic Expectations.

Character is Action.

Deep Character.

Contrasting Types.

Character Questions.

 

11. Orchestrating Characters.

The Back Story.

Good Orchestration.               

Archetypes.

Equal Opponents.

A Crucible.

Another Character Enters.      

Get to Know Your Characters.               

Character Analysis.

Stage Business.

Practicalities.

 

12. Dialogue.

Use of Language.

Accent.

Sentence Structure.

Vocal Rhythm.

Details.

Appeal to Senses.

Images, Slang, or Street Talk.

Figures of Speech.

The Gems.

The “F” Word.

First Impressions Count.

The First Line.

Length of Speeches.

Smooth Delivery.

Poetic Language.

Iambic Pentameter.

 

13. Monologues.

Types of Monologues.

Autobiographical.

Monodrama.

Reality-Based Monologues.

Topical Monologues.

Fictional Monologues.

Audition Monologues.

The Questions.

Dramatic Style.

Your Personal Style.

To Find Character’s Voice.

Characteristics of Good Monologues.

 

UNIT FOUR.

 

14. Settings and Costumes.

Theatrical Form.

Settings.

The Magic “If.”

Costumes.               

Props.

Transformations.

Sound Effects.

Concept & Production Meetings.

 

UNIT FIVE.

 

15. Genre and Style.               

Genre.

Style.

Nudity.

In Your Face Theatre.

 

16. Spine and Premise.

Spine.

Premise.

Don’t Tell — Show.

 

UNIT SIX.

 

17. Writing and Rewriting.

The First Draft.

The Second Draft.

Commas.

Copyrights.

 

18. Getting Your Play Produced.

The Next Step.

Sources of Information.

Memberships.

Production Opportunities.

Other Development Opportunities.

Contests.

Types of Theatre Companies.

Fellowships and Grants.

Agents.

Publishers.

Submitting a Script.

 

UNIT SEVEN.

 

Appendix I — Sample Syllabus.

 

Appendix II — Outcomes and Assessment.

Sharing With Others.

Discussion Guidelines.

Learning By Doing.

Assessment.

Criteria.

Checklist.

 

Bibliography.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780205412976
Author:
Clark, Leroy
Publisher:
Pearson
Subject:
General
Subject:
Composition & Creative Writing - Play/Scriptwriting
Subject:
Playwriting
Subject:
Theater - Playwriting
Subject:
General Performing Arts
Subject:
Drama-Playwriting
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
October 2005
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9 x 7 x 0.7 in 463 gr

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Directing and Production
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Playwriting
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » General
Textbooks » General

Writing for the Stage : a Practical Playwriting Guide (06 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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$51.00 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Allyn & Bacon - English 9780205412976 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

With skills-focused exercises ranging from beginning to advanced levels, Writing for the Stage takes students through the creative process to develop a stageworthy script. The purpose of Writing for the Stage: A Practical Playwriting Guide is to provide students with a variety of exercises to help develop writing skills for the stage that eventually lead to the creation of a script. Although there is no magic formula — no right or wrong way to create a dramatic work-- there are still traditional expectations for plot, conflict, theme, character development, dialogue, etc. that need to be discussed.

"Synopsis" by , With skills-focused exercises ranging from beginning to advanced levels, Writing for the Stage takes students through the creative process to develop a stageworthy script. The Essence of Drama; Getting the Idea; Planning the First Draft; The Professional Format; Rhythm; Plot; Structure; Physical Character; Sociological Characteristics; Psychological Character; Orchestrating Characters; Dialogue; Monologues; Settings and Costumes; Genre and Style; Spine and Premise; Writing and Rewriting; Getting Your Play Produced. Introductory playwriting.
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