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25 Remote Warehouse World History- India

This title in other editions

Other titles in the Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning series:

Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space (Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning)

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Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space (Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Europeans and Americans tend to hold the opinion that democracy is a uniquely Western inheritance, but in The Common Cause, Leela Gandhi recovers stories of an alternate version, describing a transnational history of democracy in the first half of the twentieth century through the lens of ethics in the broad sense of disciplined self-fashioning. Gandhi identifies a shared culture of perfectionism across imperialism, fascism, and liberalism—an ethic that excluded the ordinary and unexceptional. But, she also illuminates an ethic of moral imperfectionism, a set of anticolonial, antifascist practices devoted to ordinariness and abnegation that ranged from doomed mutinies in the Indian military to Mahatma Gandhis spiritual discipline.

 

Reframing the way we think about some of the most consequential political events of the era, Gandhi presents moral imperfectionism as the lost tradition of global democratic thought and offers it to us as a key to democracys future. In doing so, she defends democracy as a shared art of living on the other side of perfection and mounts a postcolonial appeal for an ethics of becoming common.

Synopsis:

When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people?

Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis. Manu Goswami locates the origins and contradictions of Indian nationalism in the convergence of the lived experience of colonial space, the expansive logic of capital, and interstate dynamics. Building on and critically extending subaltern and postcolonial perspectives, her study shows how nineteenth-century conceptions of India as a bounded national space and economy bequeathed an enduring tension between a universalistic political economy of nationhood and a nativist project that continues to haunt the present moment.

Elegantly conceived and judiciously argued, Producing India will be invaluable to students of history, political economy, geography, and Asian studies.

About the Author

Manu Goswani is an assistant professor of history and East Asia studies at New York University.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Geographies of State Transformation: The Production of Colonial State Space

2. Envisioning the Colonial Economy

3. Mobile Incarceration: Travels in Colonial State Space

4. Colonial Pedagogical Consolidation

5. Space, Time, and Sovereignty in Puranic-Itihas

6. India as Bharat: A Territorial Nativist Vision of Nationhood, 1860-1880

7. The Political Economy of Nationhood

8. Territorial Nativism: Swadeshi and Swaraj

Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226305097
Author:
Goswami, Manu
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Author:
Gandhi, Leela
Location:
Chicago
Subject:
India
Subject:
History
Subject:
Nationalism
Subject:
Asia - India
Subject:
Asia - India & South Asia
Subject:
Political Ideologies - Nationalism
Subject:
India - History - British occupation, 1765-
Subject:
India Economic conditions.
Subject:
World History - India
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning
Series Volume:
4386-1
Publication Date:
20040631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.00 x 6.00 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Asia » India » Ancient and General
History and Social Science » Asia » India » Modern
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » India

Producing India: From Colonial Economy to National Space (Chicago Studies in Practices of Meaning) New Trade Paper
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Product details 256 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226305097 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
When did categories such as a national space and economy acquire self-evident meaning and a global reach? Why do nationalist movements demand a territorial fix between a particular space, economy, culture, and people?

Producing India mounts a formidable challenge to the entrenched practice of methodological nationalism that has accorded an exaggerated privilege to the nation-state as a dominant unit of historical and political analysis. Manu Goswami locates the origins and contradictions of Indian nationalism in the convergence of the lived experience of colonial space, the expansive logic of capital, and interstate dynamics. Building on and critically extending subaltern and postcolonial perspectives, her study shows how nineteenth-century conceptions of India as a bounded national space and economy bequeathed an enduring tension between a universalistic political economy of nationhood and a nativist project that continues to haunt the present moment.

Elegantly conceived and judiciously argued, Producing India will be invaluable to students of history, political economy, geography, and Asian studies.

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