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My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
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The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory (New Directions in Critical Theory)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Some critical theorists understand the self as constituted by power relations, while others insist upon the self's autonomous capacities for critical reflection and deliberate self-transformation. Up to now, it has all too often been assumed that these two understandings of the self are incompatible. In her bold new book, Amy Allen argues that the capacity for autonomy is rooted in the very power relations that constitute the self.

Allen's theoretical framework illuminates both aspects of what she calls, following Foucault, the politics of our selves. It analyzes power in all its depth and complexity, including the complicated phenomenon of subjection, without giving up on the ideal of autonomy. Drawing on original and critical readings of a diverse group of theorists, including Michel Foucault, Jurgen Habermas, Judith Butler, and Seyla Benhabib, Allen shows how the self can be both constituted by power and capable of an autonomous self-constitution. Her argument is a significant and vital contribution to feminist theory and to critical social theory, both of which have long grappled with the relationship between power and agency.

If critical theory is to be truly critical, Allen argues, it will have to pay greater attention to the phenomenon of subjection, and will have to think through the challenges that the notion of subjection poses for the critical-theoretical conception of autonomy. In particular, Allen discusses in detail how the normative aspirations of Habermasian critical theory need to be recast in light of Foucault's and Butler's account of subjection. This book is original both in its attempt to think of power and autonomy simultaneously and in its effort to bring the work of Foucault and Habermas into a productive dialogue.

Synopsis:

Some critical theorists maintain that the self is embedded in and constituted by the cultural, social, and historical power constructions that surround it, while others defend the self's autonomous capacity for critical assessment and change. A deep tension exists between these two philosophical conceptions, with many assuming that they are incompatible, but in her bold new book, Amy Allen argues that the capacity for self-critique is rooted in both the power relations that constitute the self and the autonomy that arises out of a dependency with others. Her theoretical framework illuminates both aspects of what she calls, following Foucault, the politics of our selves. It analyzes power in all its depth and complexity and explores the phenomenon of subjection, which is particularly problematic for critical theorists' conception of autonomy. Drawing on original and critical readings of a diverse group of theorists, including Foucault, Jrgen Habermas, Judith Butler, and Seyla Benhabib, Allen shows how the self can be both constituted by power and capable of an autonomous self-constitution. Her argument is especially significant for feminist theory, which has long grappled with the relationship between power and agency, and critical theory, which needs a better framework for analyzing racial and sexual subordination.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780231136228
Author:
Allen, Amy
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Author:
Allen, Amy R.
Subject:
Feminist theory
Subject:
Self (philosophy)
Subject:
Movements - Deconstruction
Subject:
Mind & Body
Subject:
Sociology - Social Theory
Subject:
Feminism & Feminist Theory
Subject:
Philosophy : General
Series:
New Directions in Critical Theory
Publication Date:
20071131
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
230
Dimensions:
9.22x6.43x.83 in. 1.03 lbs.

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General

The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory (New Directions in Critical Theory) New Hardcover
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Product details 230 pages Columbia University Press - English 9780231136228 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Some critical theorists maintain that the self is embedded in and constituted by the cultural, social, and historical power constructions that surround it, while others defend the self's autonomous capacity for critical assessment and change. A deep tension exists between these two philosophical conceptions, with many assuming that they are incompatible, but in her bold new book, Amy Allen argues that the capacity for self-critique is rooted in both the power relations that constitute the self and the autonomy that arises out of a dependency with others. Her theoretical framework illuminates both aspects of what she calls, following Foucault, the politics of our selves. It analyzes power in all its depth and complexity and explores the phenomenon of subjection, which is particularly problematic for critical theorists' conception of autonomy. Drawing on original and critical readings of a diverse group of theorists, including Foucault, Jrgen Habermas, Judith Butler, and Seyla Benhabib, Allen shows how the self can be both constituted by power and capable of an autonomous self-constitution. Her argument is especially significant for feminist theory, which has long grappled with the relationship between power and agency, and critical theory, which needs a better framework for analyzing racial and sexual subordination.
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