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Burdens of Proof: Cryptographic Culture and Evidence Law in the Age of Electronic Documents

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Burdens of Proof: Cryptographic Culture and Evidence Law in the Age of Electronic Documents Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;The gradual disappearance of paper and its familiar evidential qualities affects almost every dimension of contemporary life. From health records to ballots, almost all documents are now digitized at some point of their life cycle, easily copied, altered, and distributed. In andlt;Iandgt;Burdens of Proofandlt;/Iandgt;, Jean-François Blanchette examines the challenge of defining a new evidentiary framework for electronic documents, focusing on the design of a digital equivalent to handwritten signatures.andlt;/Pandgt;andlt;Pandgt;From the blackboards of mathematicians to the halls of legislative assemblies, Blanchette traces the path of such an equivalent: digital signatures based on the mathematics of public-key cryptography. In the mid-1990s, cryptographic signatures formed the centerpiece of a worldwide wave of legal reform and of an ambitious cryptographic research agenda that sought to build privacy, anonymity, and accountability into the very infrastructure of the Internet. Yet markets for cryptographic products collapsed in the aftermath of the dot-com boom and bust along with cryptography's social projects.andlt;/Pandgt;andlt;Pandgt;Blanchette describes the trials of French bureaucracies as they wrestled with the application of electronic signatures to real estate contracts, birth certificates, and land titles, and tracks the convoluted paths through which electronic documents acquire moral authority. These paths suggest that the material world need not merely succumb to the virtual but, rather, can usefully inspire it. Indeed, Blanchette argues, in renewing their engagement with the material world, cryptographers might also find the key to broader acceptance of their design goals.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

The gradual disappearance of paper and its familiar evidential qualities affects almost every dimension of contemporary life. From health records to ballots, almost all documents are now digitized at some point of their life cycle, easily copied, altered, and distributed. In Burdens of Proof, Jean-François Blanchette examines the challenge of defining a new evidentiary framework for electronic documents, focusing on the design of a digital equivalent to handwritten signatures.

From the blackboards of mathematicians to the halls of legislative assemblies, Blanchette traces the path of such an equivalent: digital signatures based on the mathematics of public-key cryptography. In the mid-1990s, cryptographic signatures formed the centerpiece of a worldwide wave of legal reform and of an ambitious cryptographic research agenda that sought to build privacy, anonymity, and accountability into the very infrastructure of the Internet. Yet markets for cryptographic products collapsed in the aftermath of the dot-com boom and bust along with cryptography's social projects.

Blanchette describes the trials of French bureaucracies as they wrestled with the application of electronic signatures to real estate contracts, birth certificates, and land titles, and tracks the convoluted paths through which electronic documents acquire moral authority. These paths suggest that the material world need not merely succumb to the virtual but, rather, can usefully inspire it. Indeed, Blanchette argues, in renewing their engagement with the material world, cryptographers might also find the key to broader acceptance of their design goals.

About the Author

Jean-François Blanchette is Assistant Professor in the Department of Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262017510
Author:
Blanchette, Jean-francois
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Blanchette, Jean-François
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author:
Blanchette, Jean-Fran�ois
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Communications-Information Theory
Copyright:
Series:
Burdens of Proof
Publication Date:
20120427
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
28 b, &, w illus., 3 tables
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Business » General
Business » Writing
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Computers and Internet » Networking » Security » Cryptography
Engineering » Communications » Information Theory
History and Social Science » Law » Legal Guides and Reference

Burdens of Proof: Cryptographic Culture and Evidence Law in the Age of Electronic Documents New Hardcover
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$37.25 In Stock
Product details 288 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262017510 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The gradual disappearance of paper and its familiar evidential qualities affects almost every dimension of contemporary life. From health records to ballots, almost all documents are now digitized at some point of their life cycle, easily copied, altered, and distributed. In Burdens of Proof, Jean-François Blanchette examines the challenge of defining a new evidentiary framework for electronic documents, focusing on the design of a digital equivalent to handwritten signatures.

From the blackboards of mathematicians to the halls of legislative assemblies, Blanchette traces the path of such an equivalent: digital signatures based on the mathematics of public-key cryptography. In the mid-1990s, cryptographic signatures formed the centerpiece of a worldwide wave of legal reform and of an ambitious cryptographic research agenda that sought to build privacy, anonymity, and accountability into the very infrastructure of the Internet. Yet markets for cryptographic products collapsed in the aftermath of the dot-com boom and bust along with cryptography's social projects.

Blanchette describes the trials of French bureaucracies as they wrestled with the application of electronic signatures to real estate contracts, birth certificates, and land titles, and tracks the convoluted paths through which electronic documents acquire moral authority. These paths suggest that the material world need not merely succumb to the virtual but, rather, can usefully inspire it. Indeed, Blanchette argues, in renewing their engagement with the material world, cryptographers might also find the key to broader acceptance of their design goals.

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