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Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies (Software Studies)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough--or should we look further? In andlt;Iandgt; Expressive Processingandlt;/Iandgt;, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential. andlt;/Pandgt;andlt;Pandgt;Wardrip-Fruin looks at andquot;expressive processingandquot; by examining specific works of digital media ranging from the simulated therapist andlt;Iandgt;Elizaandlt;/Iandgt; to the complex city-planning game andlt;Iandgt;SimCityandlt;/Iandgt;. Digital media, he contends, offer particularly intelligible examples of things we need to understand about software in general; if we understand, for instance, the capabilities and histories of artificial intelligence techniques in the context of a computer game, we can use that understanding to judge the use of similar techniques in such higher-stakes social contexts as surveillance. andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;From the complex city-planning game SimCity to the virtual therapist Eliza: how computational processes open possibilities for understanding and creating digital media.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

From the complex city-planning game SimCity to the virtual therapist Eliza: how computational processes open possibilities for understanding and creating digital media.

Synopsis:

What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough--or should we look further? In Expressive Processing, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential.

Wardrip-Fruin looks at "expressive processing" by examining specific works of digital media ranging from the simulated therapist Eliza to the complex city-planning game SimCity. Digital media, he contends, offer particularly intelligible examples of things we need to understand about software in general; if we understand, for instance, the capabilities and histories of artificial intelligence techniques in the context of a computer game, we can use that understanding to judge the use of similar techniques in such higher-stakes social contexts as surveillance.

About the Author

Noah Wardrip-Fruin is Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He is the coeditor of four collections published by the MIT Press: with Nick Montfort, The New Media Reader (2003); with Pat Harrigan, First Person: New Media as Story, Performance, and Game (2004), Second Person: Role-Playing and Story in Games and Playable Media (2007), and Third Person: Authoring and Exploring Vast Narratives (2009).

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262517539
Subtitle:
Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies
Author:
Wardrip-fruin, Noah
Author:
Wardrip-Fruin, Noah
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Virtual Reality
Subject:
Computers-Reference - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Software Studies Expressive Processing
Publication Date:
20120217
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
29 b, &, w illus., 3 tables
Pages:
504
Dimensions:
9 x 7 x 1 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » General
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
Computers and Internet » Multimedia » Virtual Reality
Computers and Internet » Software Engineering » Game Design
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Computer Science

Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies (Software Studies) New Trade Paper
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Product details 504 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262517539 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;From the complex city-planning game SimCity to the virtual therapist Eliza: how computational processes open possibilities for understanding and creating digital media.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , From the complex city-planning game SimCity to the virtual therapist Eliza: how computational processes open possibilities for understanding and creating digital media.
"Synopsis" by , What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough--or should we look further? In Expressive Processing, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential.

Wardrip-Fruin looks at "expressive processing" by examining specific works of digital media ranging from the simulated therapist Eliza to the complex city-planning game SimCity. Digital media, he contends, offer particularly intelligible examples of things we need to understand about software in general; if we understand, for instance, the capabilities and histories of artificial intelligence techniques in the context of a computer game, we can use that understanding to judge the use of similar techniques in such higher-stakes social contexts as surveillance.

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