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Protocol (04 Edition)

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Protocol (04 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Is the Internet a vast arena of unrestricted communication and freely exchanged information or a regulated, highly structured virtual bureaucracy? In Protocol, Alexander Galloway argues that the founding principle of the Net is control, not freedom, and that the controlling power lies in the technical protocols that make network connections (and disconnections) possible. He does this by treating the computer as a textual medium that is based on a technological language, code. Code, he argues, can be subject to the same kind of cultural and literary analysis as any natural language; computer languages have their own syntax, grammar, communities, and cultures. Instead of relying on established theoretical approaches, Galloway finds a new way to write about digital media, drawing on his backgrounds in computer programming and critical theory. "Discipline-hopping is a necessity when it comes to complicated socio-technical topics like protocol," he writes in the preface.Galloway begins by examining the types of protocols that exist, including TCP/IP, DNS, and HTML. He then looks at examples of resistance and subversion — hackers, viruses, cyberfeminism, Internet art — which he views as emblematic of the larger transformations now taking place within digital culture. Written for a nontechnical audience, Protocol serves as a necessary counterpoint to the wildly utopian visions of the Net that were so widespread in earlier days.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

A critical analysis of the protocols that control the Internet and the resistance to them.

Synopsis:

Is the Internet a vast arena of unrestricted communication and freely exchanged information or a regulated, highly structured virtual bureaucracy? In

Synopsis:

Is the Internet a vast arena of unrestricted communication and freely exchanged information or a regulated, highly structured virtual bureaucracy? In Protocol, Alexander Galloway argues that the founding principle of the Net is control, not freedom, and that the controlling power lies in the technical protocols that make network connections (and disconnections) possible. He does this by treating the computer as a textual medium that is based on a technological language, code. Code, he argues, can be subject to the same kind of cultural and literary analysis as any natural language; computer languages have their own syntax, grammar, communities, and cultures. Instead of relying on established theoretical approaches, Galloway finds a new way to write about digital media, drawing on his backgrounds in computer programming and critical theory. "Discipline-hopping is a necessity when it comes to complicated socio-technical topics like protocol," he writes in the preface.Galloway begins by examining the types of protocols that exist, including TCP/IP, DNS, and HTML. He then looks at examples of resistance and subversion — hackers, viruses, cyberfeminism, Internet art — which he views as emblematic of the larger transformations now taking place within digital culture. Written for a nontechnical audience, Protocol serves as a necessary counterpoint to the wildly utopian visions of the Net that were so widespread in earlier days.

About the Author

Alexander R. Galloway is Assistant Professor of Media Ecology at New York University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262572330
Author:
Galloway, Alexander R.
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Internet - General
Subject:
Networking - Network Protocols
Subject:
Social Aspects - General
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Leonardo Book Series Protocol
Publication Date:
20060231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
21 illus.
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9 x 7 in

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Related Subjects

» Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
» Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » General
» Computers and Internet » Internet » General
» Computers and Internet » Internet » Information
» Computers and Internet » Internet » Web Publishing
» Computers and Internet » Networking » General
» Computers and Internet » Personal Computers » General
» Engineering » Engineering » History
» Science and Mathematics » Biology » General

Protocol (04 Edition) Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.50 In Stock
Product details 288 pages MIT Press - English 9780262572330 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A critical analysis of the protocols that control the Internet and the resistance to them.
"Synopsis" by , Is the Internet a vast arena of unrestricted communication and freely exchanged information or a regulated, highly structured virtual bureaucracy? In
"Synopsis" by , Is the Internet a vast arena of unrestricted communication and freely exchanged information or a regulated, highly structured virtual bureaucracy? In Protocol, Alexander Galloway argues that the founding principle of the Net is control, not freedom, and that the controlling power lies in the technical protocols that make network connections (and disconnections) possible. He does this by treating the computer as a textual medium that is based on a technological language, code. Code, he argues, can be subject to the same kind of cultural and literary analysis as any natural language; computer languages have their own syntax, grammar, communities, and cultures. Instead of relying on established theoretical approaches, Galloway finds a new way to write about digital media, drawing on his backgrounds in computer programming and critical theory. "Discipline-hopping is a necessity when it comes to complicated socio-technical topics like protocol," he writes in the preface.Galloway begins by examining the types of protocols that exist, including TCP/IP, DNS, and HTML. He then looks at examples of resistance and subversion — hackers, viruses, cyberfeminism, Internet art — which he views as emblematic of the larger transformations now taking place within digital culture. Written for a nontechnical audience, Protocol serves as a necessary counterpoint to the wildly utopian visions of the Net that were so widespread in earlier days.
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