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25 Remote Warehouse Ethnic Studies- Immigration

Opposite Poles: Immigrants and Ethnics in Polish Chicago, 1976-1990

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Opposite Poles: Immigrants and Ethnics in Polish Chicago, 1976-1990 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Opposite Poles presents a fascinating and complex portrait of ethnic life in America. The focus is Chicago Polonia, the largest Polish community outside of Warsaw. During the 1980s a new cohort of Polish immigrants from communist Poland, including many refugees from the Solidarity movement, joined the Polish American ethnics already settled in Chicago. The two groups shared an ancestral homeland, social space in Chicago, and the common goal of wanting to see Poland become an independent noncommunist nation. These common factors made the groups believe they ought to work together and help each other; but they were more often at opposite poles. The specious solidarity led to contentious conflicts as the groups competed for political and cultural ownership of the community.

Erdmans's dramatic account of intracommunity conflict demonstrates the importance of distinguishing between immigrants and ethnics in American ethnic studies. Drawing upon interviews, participant observation in the field, surveys and Polish community press accounts, she describes the social differences between the two groups that frustrated unified collective action.

We often think of ethnic and racial communities as monolithic, but the heterogeneity within Polish Chicago is by no means unique. Today in the United States new Chinese, Israeli, Haitian, Caribbean, and Mexican immigrants negotiate their identities within the context of the established identities of Asians, Jews, Blacks, and Chicanos. Opposite Poles shows that while common ancestral heritage creates the potential for ethnic allegiance, it is not a sufficient condition for collective action.

Synopsis:

Opposite Poles presents a fascinating and complex portrait of ethnic life in America. The focus is Chicago Polonia, the largest Polish community outside of Warsaw. During the 1980s a new cohort of Polish immigrants from communist Poland, including many refugees from the Solidarity movement, joined the Polish American ethnics already settled in Chicago. The two groups shared an ancestral homeland, social space in Chicago, and the common goal of wanting to see Poland become an independent noncommunist nation. These common factors made the groups believe they ought to work together and help each other; but they were more often at opposite poles. The specious solidarity led to contentious conflicts as the groups competed for political and cultural ownership of the community.

Erdmans's dramatic account of intracommunity conflict demonstrates the importance of distinguishing between immigrants and ethnics in American ethnic studies. Drawing upon interviews, participant observation in the field, surveys and Polish community press accounts, she describes the social differences between the two groups that frustrated unified collective action.

We often think of ethnic and racial communities as monolithic, but the heterogeneity within Polish Chicago is by no means unique. Today in the United States new Chinese, Israeli, Haitian, Caribbean, and Mexican immigrants negotiate their identities within the context of the established identities of Asians, Jews, Blacks, and Chicanos. Opposite Poles shows that while common ancestral heritage creates the potential for ethnic allegiance, it is not a sufficient condition for collective action.

About the Author

Mary Patrice Erdmans is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780271030197
Author:
Erdmans, Mary Patrice
Publisher:
Penn State University Press
Subject:
Minority Studies - Ethnic American
Subject:
Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - General
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Immigration
Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Subject:
Opposite Poles
Subject:
Immigrants and Ethnics in Polish Chicago
Subject:
1976-1990
Subject:
Mary Patrice Erdmans
Subject:
0-271-01735-X
Subject:
0-271-01736-8
Subject:
History
Subject:
American
Subject:
Chicago Polonia
Subject:
Polish community
Subject:
Warsaw
Subject:
cohort
Subject:
Solidarity movement
Subject:
ancestral homeland
Subject:
Social Space
Subject:
independent noncommunist nation
Subject:
intracommunity conflict
Subject:
Immigrants
Subject:
Ethnics
Subject:
American Ethnic Studies
Subject:
Chinese
Subject:
Israeli
Subject:
Haitian
Subject:
Caribbean
Subject:
Mexican
Subject:
Asians
Subject:
Jews
Subject:
Blacks
Subject:
Chicanos
Subject:
ethnic allegiance
Subject:
Collective Action
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20070531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.75 in 1.062 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration

Opposite Poles: Immigrants and Ethnics in Polish Chicago, 1976-1990 New Trade Paper
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$44.50 In Stock
Product details 280 pages Pennsylvania State University Press - English 9780271030197 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Opposite Poles presents a fascinating and complex portrait of ethnic life in America. The focus is Chicago Polonia, the largest Polish community outside of Warsaw. During the 1980s a new cohort of Polish immigrants from communist Poland, including many refugees from the Solidarity movement, joined the Polish American ethnics already settled in Chicago. The two groups shared an ancestral homeland, social space in Chicago, and the common goal of wanting to see Poland become an independent noncommunist nation. These common factors made the groups believe they ought to work together and help each other; but they were more often at opposite poles. The specious solidarity led to contentious conflicts as the groups competed for political and cultural ownership of the community.

Erdmans's dramatic account of intracommunity conflict demonstrates the importance of distinguishing between immigrants and ethnics in American ethnic studies. Drawing upon interviews, participant observation in the field, surveys and Polish community press accounts, she describes the social differences between the two groups that frustrated unified collective action.

We often think of ethnic and racial communities as monolithic, but the heterogeneity within Polish Chicago is by no means unique. Today in the United States new Chinese, Israeli, Haitian, Caribbean, and Mexican immigrants negotiate their identities within the context of the established identities of Asians, Jews, Blacks, and Chicanos. Opposite Poles shows that while common ancestral heritage creates the potential for ethnic allegiance, it is not a sufficient condition for collective action.

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