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25 Remote Warehouse Recovery and Addiction- Drug and Alcohol Addiction

This title in other editions

Our Right to Drugs: The Case for a Free Market

by

Our Right to Drugs: The Case for a Free Market Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

.In Our Right to Drugs, Thomas Szasz shows that our present drug war started at the beginning of this century, when the American government first assumed the task of protecting people from patent medicines. By the end of World War I, however, the free market in drugs was but a dim memory, if that. Instead of dwelling on the familiar impracticality or unfairness of our drug laws, Szasz demonstrates the deleterious effects of prescription laws which place people under lifelong medical tutelage. The result is that most Americans today prefer a coercive and corrupt command drug economy to a free market in drugs.

Throughout the book, Szasz stresses the consequences of the fateful transformation of the central aim of American drug prohibitions from protecting us from being fooled by misbranded drugs to protecting us from harming ourselves by self-medication--defined as drug abuse. And he reminds us that the choice between self-control and state coercion applies to all areas of our lives, drugs being but one of the theaters in which this perennial play may be staged. A free society, Szasz emphasizes, cannot endure if its citizens reject the values of self-discipline and personal responsibility and if the state treats adults as if they were naughty children. In a no-holds-barred examination of the implementation of the War on Drugs, Szasz shows that under the guise of protecting the vulnerable members of our society--especially children, blacks, and the sick--our government has persecuted and injured them. Leading politicians persuade parents to denounce their children, and encourage children to betray their parents and friends--behavior that subverts family loyalties and destroys basic human decency. And instead of protecting blacks and Hispanics from dangerous drugs, this holy war has allowed us to persecute them, not as racists but as therapists--working selflessly to bring about a drug-free America. Last but not least, to millions of sick Americans, the War on Drugs has meant being deprived of the medicines they want-- because the drugs are illegal, unapproved here though approved abroad, or require a prescription a physician may be afraid to provide. The bizarre upshot of our drug policy is that many Americans now believe they have a right to die, which they will do anyway, while few believe they have a right to drugs, even though that does not mean they have to take any. Often jolting, always stimulating, Our Right to Drugs is likely to have the same explosive effect on our ideas about drugs and drug laws as, more than thirty years ago, The Myth of Mental Illness had on our ideas about insanity and psychiatry.

Synopsis:

"Dr. Szasz has written a profound analysis of the moral issues raised by prohibition of drugs. Whether you favor or oppose our present drug policy, reading this book will transform your understanding of the real issues involved." Milton Friedman

Synopsis:

"My aim" states Szasz, "is to mount a critique of our current drug laws and social policies, based on the fundamental premise that a limited government, epitomized by the U.S., lacks the political legitimacy to deprive competent adults of the right to ingest, inhale, or inject whatever substance they want. . . In summary my argument is that the constraints on the power of the federal government, laid down in the Constitution, have been eroded by a monopolistic medical profession administering a system of prescription laws that, in effect, have removed most of the drugs people want from the free market. Hence, it is futile to debate whether the War on Drugs should be escalated or de-escalated, without first coming to grips with the popular and political mindset concerning the trade in drugs generated by nearly a century of drug prohibitions."

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [185]-189) and indexes.

About the Author

THOMAS SZASZ is Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry, State University of New York Health Science Center, Syracuse.

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

Drugs as Property: The Right We Rejected

The American Ambivalence: Liberty vs. Utopia

The Fear We Favor: Drugs as Scapegoats

Drug Education: The Cult of Drug Disinformation

The Debate on Drugs: The Lie of "Legalization"

Blacks and Drugs: Crack As "Genocide"

Doctors and Drugs: The Perils of Prohibition

Between Dread and Desire: The Burden of Choice

References

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780275942168
Author:
Szasz, Thomas
Publisher:
Praeger Publishers
Location:
New York :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Health Policy
Subject:
Public Policy
Subject:
Narcotics, control of
Subject:
Drug legalization
Subject:
Drug and narcotic control.
Subject:
Drug legalization -- United States.
Subject:
Pharmaceutical policy.
Subject:
Substance-Related Disorders -- epidemiology -- United States.
Subject:
Narcotics, Control of -- Moral and ethical aspects.
Subject:
Substance-Related Disorders
Subject:
Substance Abuse & Addictions - General
Subject:
Public Policy - General
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Drug control--United States
Subject:
Pharmaceutical policy -- United States.
Subject:
Recovery and Addiction - Drug and Alcohol Addiction
Edition Description:
he real issues involved." Milton Friedman
Series Volume:
v. 1930
Publication Date:
19920431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
232
Dimensions:
9.72x6.30x.73 in. .99 lbs.

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Recovery and Addiction » Drug and Alcohol Addiction
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics

Our Right to Drugs: The Case for a Free Market New Hardcover
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$68.50 In Stock
Product details 232 pages Praeger Publishers - English 9780275942168 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Dr. Szasz has written a profound analysis of the moral issues raised by prohibition of drugs. Whether you favor or oppose our present drug policy, reading this book will transform your understanding of the real issues involved." Milton Friedman
"Synopsis" by , "My aim" states Szasz, "is to mount a critique of our current drug laws and social policies, based on the fundamental premise that a limited government, epitomized by the U.S., lacks the political legitimacy to deprive competent adults of the right to ingest, inhale, or inject whatever substance they want. . . In summary my argument is that the constraints on the power of the federal government, laid down in the Constitution, have been eroded by a monopolistic medical profession administering a system of prescription laws that, in effect, have removed most of the drugs people want from the free market. Hence, it is futile to debate whether the War on Drugs should be escalated or de-escalated, without first coming to grips with the popular and political mindset concerning the trade in drugs generated by nearly a century of drug prohibitions."
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