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25 Remote Warehouse Literary Criticism- General

Strange Felicity: Eudora Welty's Subtexts on Fiction and Society

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Strange Felicity: Eudora Welty's Subtexts on Fiction and Society Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Thornton identifies two kinds of metafictions in Welty's works that testify to the author's confidence in the power of that particular form of fiction to achieve the results she desires. The first deals with literary issues such as language, fiction, readership, and authorship as they are embodied in the particular fiction. The other addresses the social subtexts, which carry the author's social message, or observations, buried beneath the surface story for the reader to excavate. By taking up major works from different stages of Welty's literary career, Thornton reveals the subtexts and, therefore, the author's ideas about the literary and social role of her own fiction.

The postmodernist idea that all literary texts are inherently self-reflexive derives from the assumption that a text consists of the surface story and various buried subtexts. Through one or more of those subtexts, the work is considered to be speaking in the author's behalf about itself, or about the fiction or literature of which it is an example. Thornton identifies two kinds of metafictions in Welty's works that testify to the author's confidence in the power of that particular form of fiction to achieve the results she desires. The first deals with literary issues such as language, fiction, readership, and authorship as they are embodied in the particular fiction. The other addresses the social subtexts, which carry the author's social message, or observations, buried beneath the surface story for the reader to excavate. By taking up major works from different stages of Welty's literary career, Thornton reveals the subtexts and, therefore, the author's ideas about the literary and social role of her own fiction.

Through a careful examination of the subtexts found in Welty's fiction, the author challenges the notion that Welty was the apolitical, asocial writer that many have thought her to be. Instead, this book reveals how many of the political messages about society, and about different aspects of literature, have been camouflaged by the surface stories that mask Welty's ideas about the social and institutional immorality and unhappiness of the real world. Broken into four parts, Thornton draws on the theories of Bakhtin, Barthes, Bourdieu, Derrida, and Macherey in order to place Welty, and her work, in a new position in the history of American literature.

Book News Annotation:

Noting that writer Eudora Welty demonstrates a concern for and interest in the role and status of fiction within her writing, as well as a concern for the wider world that gave birth to the fictions, Thornton (English and comparative literature, Japan Women's U., Tokyo) proposes to examine the subtexts of fiction and society as they appear in such works as Delta Wedding, The Robber Bridegroom, The Golden Apples, and other works deemed pertinent to the theme. She argues that Welty's fictions exhibit a felicity in juggling and intermingling literary and social concerns that cannot be provided by the many literary theories that have attempted to deal with Welty's work. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Examines the metafictions and subtexts various works by Eudora Welty.

Synopsis:

The postmodernist idea that all literary texts are inherently self-reflexive derives from the assumption that a text consists of the surface story and various buried subtexts. Through one or more of those subtexts, the work is considered to be speaking in the author's behalf about itself, or about the fiction or literature of which it is an example. Thornton identifies two kinds of metafictions in Welty's works that testify to the author's confidence in the power of that particular form of fiction to achieve the results she desires. The first deals with literary issues such as language, fiction, readership, and authorship as they are embodied in the particular fiction. The other addresses the social subtexts, which carry the author's social message, or observations, buried beneath the surface story for the reader to excavate. By taking up major works from different stages of Welty's literary career, Thornton reveals the subtexts and, therefore, the author's ideas about the literary and social role of her own fiction. Through a careful examination of the subtexts found in Welty's fiction, the author challenges the notion that Welty was the apolitical, asocial writer that many have thought her to be. Instead, this book reveals how many of the political messages about society, and about different aspects of literature, have been camouflaged by the surface stories that mask Welty's ideas about the social and institutional immorality and unhappiness of the real world. Broken into four parts, Thornton draws on the theories of Bakhtin, Barthes, Bourdieu, Derrida, and Macherey in order to place Welty, and her work, in a new position in the history of American literature.

About the Author

NAOKO FUWA THORNTON is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Japan Women's University in Tokyo. She has published Japanese translations of Welty's The Golden Apples and The Ponder Heart.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Speaking For: Race

The Smoke and Safety Valve of "Powerhouse"

Delta Wedding: A Celebration of a Horrible World

The Power of

Product Details

ISBN:
9780275980481
Author:
Garrett, Howard
Publisher:
Praeger Publishers
Author:
Thornton, Naoko Fuwa
Author:
Naoko F. Thornton
Author:
Thornton, Naoko
Location:
Westport, Conn.
Subject:
History
Subject:
American
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
Literature and society
Subject:
Social problems in literature
Subject:
Narration
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
Literature and society -- United States.
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Series Volume:
IMS-20
Publication Date:
20030831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Pages:
200
Dimensions:
9.52x6.32x.81 in. .96 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

Strange Felicity: Eudora Welty's Subtexts on Fiction and Society New Hardcover
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$98.95 In Stock
Product details 200 pages Praeger Publishers - English 9780275980481 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Examines the metafictions and subtexts various works by Eudora Welty.
"Synopsis" by , The postmodernist idea that all literary texts are inherently self-reflexive derives from the assumption that a text consists of the surface story and various buried subtexts. Through one or more of those subtexts, the work is considered to be speaking in the author's behalf about itself, or about the fiction or literature of which it is an example. Thornton identifies two kinds of metafictions in Welty's works that testify to the author's confidence in the power of that particular form of fiction to achieve the results she desires. The first deals with literary issues such as language, fiction, readership, and authorship as they are embodied in the particular fiction. The other addresses the social subtexts, which carry the author's social message, or observations, buried beneath the surface story for the reader to excavate. By taking up major works from different stages of Welty's literary career, Thornton reveals the subtexts and, therefore, the author's ideas about the literary and social role of her own fiction. Through a careful examination of the subtexts found in Welty's fiction, the author challenges the notion that Welty was the apolitical, asocial writer that many have thought her to be. Instead, this book reveals how many of the political messages about society, and about different aspects of literature, have been camouflaged by the surface stories that mask Welty's ideas about the social and institutional immorality and unhappiness of the real world. Broken into four parts, Thornton draws on the theories of Bakhtin, Barthes, Bourdieu, Derrida, and Macherey in order to place Welty, and her work, in a new position in the history of American literature.
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