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The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon: A Sense of Space

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The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon: A Sense of Space Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Wanano Indians of the northwest Amazon have a social system that differs from those of most tropical forest tribes. Neither stratified by wealth nor strictly egalitarian, Wanano society is ranked according to rigidly bound descent groups. In this pioneering ethnographic study, Janet M. Chernela decodes the structure of Wanano society.

In Wanano culture, children can be grandparents, while elders can be grandchildren. This apparent contradiction springs from the fact that descent from ranked ancestors, rather than age or accumulated wealth, determines one's standing in Wanano society. But ranking's impulse is muted as senior clans, considered to be succulent (referring to both seniority and resource abundance), must be generous gift-givers. In this way, resources are distributed throughout the society.

In two poignant chapters aptly entitled Ordinary Dramas, Chernela shows that rank is a site of contest, resulting in exile, feuding, personal shame, and even death. Thus, Chernela's account is dynamic, placing rank in historic as well as personal context.

As the deforestation of the Amazon continues, the Wanano and other indigenous peoples face growing threats of habitat destruction and eventual extinction. If these peoples are to be saved, they must first be known and valued. The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon is an important step in that direction.

Synopsis:

The Wanano Indians of the Northwest Amazon have a social system that differs from those of most tropical forest tribes. Wanano society is 'ranked' according to rigidly bound descent groups. In this pioneering ethnographic study, Janet Chernela decodes the structure of Wanano society.

Synopsis:

As the deforestation of the Amazon continues, the Wanano and other indigenous peoples face growing threats of habitat destruction and eventual extinction. If these peoples are to be saved, they must first be known and valued. The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon is an important step in that direction.

Synopsis:

The Wanano Indians of the northwest Amazon have a social system that differs from those of most tropical forest tribes. Neither stratified by wealth nor strictly egalitarian, Wanano society is ranked according to rigidly bound descent groups. In this pioneering ethnographic study, Janet M. Chernela decodes the structure of Wanano society.In Wanano culture, children can be grandparents, while elders can be grandchildren. This apparent contradiction springs from the fact that descent from ranked ancestors, rather than age or accumulated wealth, determines one's standing in Wanano society. But ranking's impulse is muted as senior clans, considered to be succulent (referring to both seniority and resource abundance), must be generous gift-givers. In this way, resources are distributed throughout the society.In two poignant chapters aptly entitled Ordinary Dramas, Chernela shows that rank is a site of contest, resulting in exile, feuding, personal shame, and even death. Thus, Chernela's account is dynamic, placing rank in historic as well as personal context.As the deforestation of the Amazon continues, the Wanano and other indigenous peoples face growing threats of habitat destruction and eventual extinction. If these peoples are to be saved, they must first be known and valued. The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon is an important step in that direction.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780292711860
Author:
Chernela, Janet
Publisher:
University of Texas Press
Location:
Austin
Subject:
General
Subject:
Native American Studies
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
South American
Subject:
Social conditions
Subject:
Brazil
Subject:
Social status
Subject:
Guanano Indians.
Subject:
Indios
Subject:
Antropologia Cult Social
Subject:
Historia do brasil - sociedade
Subject:
Latin America - South America
Subject:
World History-South America
Series Volume:
94.1
Publication Date:
19960131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
208
Dimensions:
9.00x6.04x.68 in. .73 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Central and South America
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » World History » South America

The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon: A Sense of Space New Trade Paper
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Product details 208 pages University of Texas Press - English 9780292711860 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The Wanano Indians of the Northwest Amazon have a social system that differs from those of most tropical forest tribes. Wanano society is 'ranked' according to rigidly bound descent groups. In this pioneering ethnographic study, Janet Chernela decodes the structure of Wanano society.
"Synopsis" by , As the deforestation of the Amazon continues, the Wanano and other indigenous peoples face growing threats of habitat destruction and eventual extinction. If these peoples are to be saved, they must first be known and valued. The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon is an important step in that direction.
"Synopsis" by , The Wanano Indians of the northwest Amazon have a social system that differs from those of most tropical forest tribes. Neither stratified by wealth nor strictly egalitarian, Wanano society is ranked according to rigidly bound descent groups. In this pioneering ethnographic study, Janet M. Chernela decodes the structure of Wanano society.In Wanano culture, children can be grandparents, while elders can be grandchildren. This apparent contradiction springs from the fact that descent from ranked ancestors, rather than age or accumulated wealth, determines one's standing in Wanano society. But ranking's impulse is muted as senior clans, considered to be succulent (referring to both seniority and resource abundance), must be generous gift-givers. In this way, resources are distributed throughout the society.In two poignant chapters aptly entitled Ordinary Dramas, Chernela shows that rank is a site of contest, resulting in exile, feuding, personal shame, and even death. Thus, Chernela's account is dynamic, placing rank in historic as well as personal context.As the deforestation of the Amazon continues, the Wanano and other indigenous peoples face growing threats of habitat destruction and eventual extinction. If these peoples are to be saved, they must first be known and valued. The Wanano Indians of the Brazilian Amazon is an important step in that direction.
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