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25 Remote Warehouse World History- Ancient History

Time, History, and Belief in Aztec and Colonial Mexico

by

Time, History, and Belief in Aztec and Colonial Mexico Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Based on their enormously complex calendars that recorded cycles of many kinds, the Aztecs and other ancient Mesoamerican civilizations are generally believed to have had a cyclical, rather than linear, conception of time and history. This boldly revisionist book challenges that understanding. Ross Hassig offers convincing evidence that for the Aztecs time was predominantly linear, that it was manipulated by the state as a means of controlling a dispersed tribute empire, and that the Conquest cut off state control and severed the unity of the calendar, leaving only the lesser cycles. From these, he asserts, we have inadequately reconstructed the pre-Columbian calendar and so misunderstood the Aztec conception of time and history. <P>Hassig first presents the traditional explanation of the Aztec calendrical system and its ideological functions and then marshals contrary evidence to argue that the Aztec elite deliberately used calendars and timekeeping to achieve practical political ends. He further traces how the Conquest played out in the temporal realm as Spanish conceptions of time partially displaced the Aztec ones. His findings promise to revolutionize our understanding of how the Aztecs and other Mesoamerican societies conceived of time and history.

Synopsis:

Based on their enormously complex calendars that recorded cycles of many kinds, the Aztecs and other ancient Mesoamerican civilizations are generally believed to have had a cyclical, rather than linear, conception of time and history. This boldly revisionist book challenges that understanding. Ross Hassig offers convincing evidence that for the Aztecs time was predominantly linear, that it was manipulated by the state as a means of controlling a dispersed tribute empire, and that the Conquest cut off state control and severed the unity of the calendar, leaving only the lesser cycles. From these, he asserts, we have inadequately reconstructed the pre-Columbian calendar and so misunderstood the Aztec conception of time and history.

Hassig first presents the traditional explanation of the Aztec calendrical system and its ideological functions and then marshals contrary evidence to argue that the Aztec elite deliberately used calendars and timekeeping to achieve practical political ends. He further traces how the Conquest played out in the temporal realm as Spanish conceptions of time partially displaced the Aztec ones. His findings promise to revolutionize our understanding of how the Aztecs and other Mesoamerican societies conceived of time and history.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-209) and index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780292731400
Author:
Hassig, Ross
Publisher:
University of Texas Press
Location:
Austin, TX
Subject:
History
Subject:
Ancient - General
Subject:
Archaeology
Subject:
Mexico
Subject:
Aztecs
Subject:
Time
Subject:
Manuscripts, Nahuatl.
Subject:
Aztec calendar.
Subject:
Aztec cosmology
Subject:
Latin America - Mexico
Subject:
Aztecs -- History.
Subject:
Mexico History Spanish colony, 1540-1810.
Subject:
World History-Ancient History
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
63, supl. 1
Publication Date:
20010431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
9.08x6.02x.66 in. .86 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Archaeology » General
History and Social Science » Latin America » Mexico
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » Ancient History
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » Mexico
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » General

Time, History, and Belief in Aztec and Colonial Mexico New Trade Paper
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$32.50 In Stock
Product details 240 pages University of Texas Press - English 9780292731400 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Based on their enormously complex calendars that recorded cycles of many kinds, the Aztecs and other ancient Mesoamerican civilizations are generally believed to have had a cyclical, rather than linear, conception of time and history. This boldly revisionist book challenges that understanding. Ross Hassig offers convincing evidence that for the Aztecs time was predominantly linear, that it was manipulated by the state as a means of controlling a dispersed tribute empire, and that the Conquest cut off state control and severed the unity of the calendar, leaving only the lesser cycles. From these, he asserts, we have inadequately reconstructed the pre-Columbian calendar and so misunderstood the Aztec conception of time and history.

Hassig first presents the traditional explanation of the Aztec calendrical system and its ideological functions and then marshals contrary evidence to argue that the Aztec elite deliberately used calendars and timekeeping to achieve practical political ends. He further traces how the Conquest played out in the temporal realm as Spanish conceptions of time partially displaced the Aztec ones. His findings promise to revolutionize our understanding of how the Aztecs and other Mesoamerican societies conceived of time and history.

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