25 Books to Read Before You Die
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 18, 2014

Ian Leslie: IMG Empathic Curiosity



Today, we wonder anxiously if digital media is changing our brains. But if there's any time in history when our mental operations changed... Continue »
  1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$30.50
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
1 Local Warehouse Humor- Comedy Business and Criticism

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

A Trade Like Any Other: Female Singers and Dancers in Egypt

by

A Trade Like Any Other: Female Singers and Dancers in Egypt Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In Egypt, singing and dancing are considered essential on happy occasions. Professional entertainers often perform at weddings and other celebrations, and a host family's prestige rises with the number, expense, and fame of the entertainers they hire. Paradoxically, however, the entertainers themselves are often viewed as disreputable people and are accorded little prestige in Egyptian society. This paradox forms the starting point of Karin van Nieuwkerk's look at the Egyptian entertainment trade. She explores the lives of female performers and the reasons why work they regard as a trade like any other is considered disreputable in Egyptian society. In particular, she demonstrates that while male entertainers are often viewed as simply making a living, female performers are almost always considered bad, seductive women engaged in dishonorable conduct. She traces this perception to the social definition of the female body as always and only sexual and enticing--a perception that stigmatizes women entertainers even as it simultaneously offers them a means of livelihood. Drawn from extensive fieldwork and enriched with the life stories of entertainers and nightclub performers, this is the first ethnography of female singers and dancers in present-day Egypt. It will be of interest to a wide audience in anthropology, women's studies, and Middle Eastern culture, as well as anyone who enjoys belly dancing.

Synopsis:

In Egypt, singing and dancing are considered essential on happy occasions. Professional entertainers often perform at weddings and other celebrations, and a host family's prestige rises with the number, expense, and fame of the entertainers they hire. Paradoxically, however, the entertainers themselves are often viewed as disreputable people and are accorded little prestige in Egyptian society. This paradox forms the starting point of Karin van Nieuwkerk's look at the Egyptian entertainment trade. She explores the lives of female performers and the reasons why work they regard as a trade like any other is considered disreputable in Egyptian society. In particular, she demonstrates that while male entertainers are often viewed as simply making a living, female performers are almost always considered bad, seductive women engaged in dishonorable conduct. She traces this perception to the social definition of the female body as always and only sexual and enticing--a perception that stigmatizes women entertainers even as it simultaneously offers them a means of livelihood. Drawn from extensive fieldwork and enriched with the life stories of entertainers and nightclub performers, this is the first ethnography of female singers and dancers in present-day Egypt. It will be of interest to a wide audience in anthropology, women's studies, and Middle Eastern culture, as well as anyone who enjoys belly dancing.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 211-219) and index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780292787230
Author:
Van Nieuwkerk, Karin
Author:
Nieuwkerk, Karin Van
Author:
Van Nieuwkerk, Kathy
Publisher:
University of Texas Press
Location:
Austin :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Middle East - Egypt
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Egypt
Subject:
Comedy
Subject:
Belly dance
Subject:
Women entertainers
Subject:
Belly dance music.
Subject:
Belly dance music -- Egypt.
Subject:
Women entertainers - Egypt -
Subject:
Humor-Comedy Business and Criticism
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Series Volume:
186026
Publication Date:
19950131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.95x6.00x.64 in. .88 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. Serpent of the Nile: Women and Dance... Used Trade Paper $6.95
  2. Ancient Egyptian Dances New Trade Paper $9.95
  3. Miss McKirdys Daughter Used Hardcover $9.95
  4. Advice for Dancers: Emotional... Used Hardcover $8.95
  5. The Player, the Rapture, New Age Used Trade Paper $7.95
  6. Hawaii :a history, from Polynesian... Used Trade Paper $7.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Dance » World and Ethnic
Arts and Entertainment » Drama » Acting
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Comedy Business and Criticism
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Archaeology » General
History and Social Science » World History » Africa

A Trade Like Any Other: Female Singers and Dancers in Egypt New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$30.50 In Stock
Product details 240 pages University of Texas Press - English 9780292787230 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In Egypt, singing and dancing are considered essential on happy occasions. Professional entertainers often perform at weddings and other celebrations, and a host family's prestige rises with the number, expense, and fame of the entertainers they hire. Paradoxically, however, the entertainers themselves are often viewed as disreputable people and are accorded little prestige in Egyptian society. This paradox forms the starting point of Karin van Nieuwkerk's look at the Egyptian entertainment trade. She explores the lives of female performers and the reasons why work they regard as a trade like any other is considered disreputable in Egyptian society. In particular, she demonstrates that while male entertainers are often viewed as simply making a living, female performers are almost always considered bad, seductive women engaged in dishonorable conduct. She traces this perception to the social definition of the female body as always and only sexual and enticing--a perception that stigmatizes women entertainers even as it simultaneously offers them a means of livelihood. Drawn from extensive fieldwork and enriched with the life stories of entertainers and nightclub performers, this is the first ethnography of female singers and dancers in present-day Egypt. It will be of interest to a wide audience in anthropology, women's studies, and Middle Eastern culture, as well as anyone who enjoys belly dancing.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.