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Being Colonized: The Kuba Experience in Rural Congo, 1880-1960 (Africa and the Diaspora: History, Politics, Culture)

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Being Colonized: The Kuba Experience in Rural Congo, 1880-1960 (Africa and the Diaspora: History, Politics, Culture) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of twelve children in a close-knit, affluent Catholic Belgian family, Jan Vansina began life in a seemingly sheltered environment. But that cocoon was soon pierced by the escalating tensions and violence that gripped Europe in the 1930s and 1940s. In this book Vansina recalls his boyhood and youth in Antwerp, Bruges, and the Flemish countryside as the country was rocked by waves of economic depression, fascism, competing nationalisms, and the occupation of first Axis and then Allied forces.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Within the vast literature on World War II, a much smaller body of work treats the everyday experiences of civilians, particularly in smaller countries drawn into the conflict. Recalling the war in Belgium from a childand#8217;s-eye perspective, Vansina describes pangs of hunger so great as to make him crave the bitter taste of cod-liver oil. He vividly remembers the shock of seeing severely wounded men on the grounds of a field hospital, the dangers of crossing fields and swimming in ponds strafed by planes, and his familyand#8217;s interactions with occupying and escaping soldiers from both sides. After the war he recalls emerging numb from the cinema where he first saw the footage of the Nazi death camps, and he describes a new phase of unrest marked by looting, vigilante justice, and the countryand#8217;s efforts at reunification.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Vansina, a historian and anthropologist best known for his insights into oral tradition and social memory, draws on his own memories and those of his siblings to reconstruct daily life in Belgium during a tumultuous era.

Synopsis:

Vansina, a historian and anthropologist best known for his insights into oral tradition and social memory, draws on his own memories and those of his siblings to reconstruct daily life in Belgium during World War II.

Synopsis:

Belgium was a small, neutral country without a colonial tradition when King Leopold II ceded the Congo, his personal property, to the state in 1908. For the next half century, Belgium not only ruled an African empire but also, through widespread, enduring, and eagerly embraced propaganda, produced an imperialist-minded citizenry.

and#160;
Selling the Congo is a study of European pro-empire propaganda in Belgium, with particular emphasis on the period 1908and#8211;60. Matthew G. Stanard examines the nature of Belgian imperialism in the Congo and considers its case in light of literature on the French, the British, and other European overseas empires. Comparing Belgium to other imperial powers, the book finds that pro-empire propaganda was a basic part of European overseas expansion and administration during the modern period. Arguing against the long-held belief that Belgians were merely and#8220;reluctant imperialists,and#8221; Stanard demonstrates that in fact many Belgians readily embraced imperialistic propaganda.

and#160;
Selling the Congo contributes to our understanding of the effectiveness of twentieth-century propaganda by revealing its successes and failures in the Belgian case. Many readers familiar with more-popular histories of Belgian imperialism will find in this book a deeper examination of European involvement in central Africa during the colonial era.

Synopsis:

What was it like to be colonized by foreigners? Highlighting a region in central Congo, in the center of sub-Saharan Africa, Being Colonized places Africans at the heart of the story. In a richly textured history that will appeal to general readers and students as well as to scholars, the distinguished historian Jan Vansina offers not just accounts of colonial administrators, missionaries, and traders, but the varied voices of a colonized people. Vansina uncovers the history revealed in local news, customs, gossip, and even dreams, as related by African villagers through archival documents, material culture, and oral interviews.

and#160;and#160;and#160; Vansinaandrsquo;s case study of the colonial experience is the realm of Kuba, a kingdom in Congo about the size of New Jerseyandmdash;and two-thirds the size of its colonial master, Belgium. The experience of its inhabitants is the story of colonialism, from its earliest manifestations to its tumultuous end. What happened in Kuba happened to varying degrees throughout Africa and other colonized regions: racism, economic exploitation, indirect rule, Christian conversion, modernization, disease and healing, and transformations in gender relations. The Kuba, like others, took their own active part in history, responding to the changes and calamities that colonization set in motion. Vansina follows the regionandrsquo;s inhabitants from the late nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century, when a new elite emerged on the eve of Congoandrsquo;s dramatic passage to independence.

About the Author

Jan Vansina, now emeritus, held the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professorship and the Vilas Professorship in History and Anthropology at the University of Wisconsinandndash;Madison. His many books include his memoir Living with Africa, as well as Oral Tradition as History, Antecedents to Rwanda, Kingdoms of the Savanna, The Children of Woot, and Paths in the Rainforests, all published by the University of Wisconsin Press. Considered one of the founders of the academic field of African studies, he was the second scholar chosen as andldquo;Distinguished Africanistandrdquo; by the African Studies Association of the United States.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations   

Acknowledgments   

A Note on Spelling and Pronunciation   

Introduction   

1 Congo: Becoming a Colony   

2 The Colonial Relationship   

3 Incidental Conquest   

4 Company Rule and Its Consequences   

5 Were the Kuba Nearly Wiped Out?   

6 Fifty Years of Belgian Rule: An Overview   

7 A Kingdom Preserved   

8 Village Life: 1911–1950s   

9 In Pursuit of Harmony   

10 Visions for a Different Future   

11 Toward a New World   

Conclusion: The Experience of Being Colonized   

Index   

Product Details

ISBN:
9780299236441
Author:
Vansina, Jan
Publisher:
University of Wisconsin Press
Author:
Stanard, Matthew G.
Subject:
Congo (Democratic Republic) History.
Subject:
Congo (Democratic Republic) - History - 1908-
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - General
Subject:
Africa, central
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
World - Colonial Studies
Subject:
World History-General
Edition Description:
1
Series:
Africa and the Diaspora: History, Politics, Culture
Publication Date:
20100331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
26 b/w illus., 14 maps
Pages:
408
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Africa » Congo
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Politics » Colonialism and Post-Colonialism
History and Social Science » World History » Africa
History and Social Science » World History » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Birds » Birdwatching
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Science and Mathematics » Ornithology » General Ornithology and Birding

Being Colonized: The Kuba Experience in Rural Congo, 1880-1960 (Africa and the Diaspora: History, Politics, Culture) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$26.50 In Stock
Product details 408 pages University of Wisconsin Press - English 9780299236441 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Vansina, a historian and anthropologist best known for his insights into oral tradition and social memory, draws on his own memories and those of his siblings to reconstruct daily life in Belgium during World War II.

"Synopsis" by ,
Belgium was a small, neutral country without a colonial tradition when King Leopold II ceded the Congo, his personal property, to the state in 1908. For the next half century, Belgium not only ruled an African empire but also, through widespread, enduring, and eagerly embraced propaganda, produced an imperialist-minded citizenry.

and#160;
Selling the Congo is a study of European pro-empire propaganda in Belgium, with particular emphasis on the period 1908and#8211;60. Matthew G. Stanard examines the nature of Belgian imperialism in the Congo and considers its case in light of literature on the French, the British, and other European overseas empires. Comparing Belgium to other imperial powers, the book finds that pro-empire propaganda was a basic part of European overseas expansion and administration during the modern period. Arguing against the long-held belief that Belgians were merely and#8220;reluctant imperialists,and#8221; Stanard demonstrates that in fact many Belgians readily embraced imperialistic propaganda.

and#160;
Selling the Congo contributes to our understanding of the effectiveness of twentieth-century propaganda by revealing its successes and failures in the Belgian case. Many readers familiar with more-popular histories of Belgian imperialism will find in this book a deeper examination of European involvement in central Africa during the colonial era.

"Synopsis" by ,
What was it like to be colonized by foreigners? Highlighting a region in central Congo, in the center of sub-Saharan Africa, Being Colonized places Africans at the heart of the story. In a richly textured history that will appeal to general readers and students as well as to scholars, the distinguished historian Jan Vansina offers not just accounts of colonial administrators, missionaries, and traders, but the varied voices of a colonized people. Vansina uncovers the history revealed in local news, customs, gossip, and even dreams, as related by African villagers through archival documents, material culture, and oral interviews.

and#160;and#160;and#160; Vansinaandrsquo;s case study of the colonial experience is the realm of Kuba, a kingdom in Congo about the size of New Jerseyandmdash;and two-thirds the size of its colonial master, Belgium. The experience of its inhabitants is the story of colonialism, from its earliest manifestations to its tumultuous end. What happened in Kuba happened to varying degrees throughout Africa and other colonized regions: racism, economic exploitation, indirect rule, Christian conversion, modernization, disease and healing, and transformations in gender relations. The Kuba, like others, took their own active part in history, responding to the changes and calamities that colonization set in motion. Vansina follows the regionandrsquo;s inhabitants from the late nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century, when a new elite emerged on the eve of Congoandrsquo;s dramatic passage to independence.

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